News24

Gaddafi son Saadi 'to remain in Niger'

2011-11-16 07:37

Niamey - Niger said on Tuesday that Muammar Gaddafi's son Saadi would remain in the West African nation until a United Nations travel ban on him was lifted, despite Tripoli's request for his return.

Saadi fled south across the Sahara to Niger as his father's 42-year rule crumbled in August. He has been living in Niger since then, and Niamey says he has been granted asylum on humanitarian grounds.

Saif al-Islam, another fugitive son of the former Libyan leader, is believed by many to have sought refuge in Niger or neighbouring Mali's desert north but both states say he is not there.

Like many other senior members of the Gaddafi regime, Saadi, a businessman and former professional footballer, was banned from travelling and had his assets frozen by a UN Security Council resolution when violence erupted earlier this year.

"We are obliged to respect this resolution. He is here, he cannot travel ... Until that resolution is revised, he will stay in Niger," Foreign Minister Bazoum Mohamed told state television on Tuesday evening.

Interpol has issued a "red notice" requesting member states to arrest Saadi with a view to extradition if they find him on their territory.

Ties between Niger and Libya's interim rulers are strained, with the authorities in Tripoli keen to see the Gaddafi sons, and any assets they took with them, sent home to face trial.

Muammar Gaddafi had deep but often complicated ties with nations to the south of Libya, which were given lavish supplies of petro-dollars but also suffered as a result of his meddling in the politics of their northern desert regions.

Comments
  • Ryan - 2011-11-16 13:04

    wow the Foreign Minister of Niger is an idiot. let me help you ... the travel ban does not prevent his extradition to face criminal charges. gosh.

      Ryan - 2011-11-16 13:07

      nice to see there are so many other "politicians" in Africa of the quality youd expect of our government. honestly sounds like the kind of mumbo jumbo we'd hear from one of ours

  • tatjana.dimitrijevic - 2011-11-16 18:46

    With hundreds of billions dollars in contracts up for grabs, Libya’s bombardment looks like an excellent investment from any perspective. With the exception of those who count in the moral cost of thousands of Libyans killed in the bloody civil war with NATO’s direct support. Libya has big plans for its post-war future, hoping to be reborn as the next Dubai and having all the necessary sun and beaches, with oil reserves aplenty. British companies are likely to come out on top of those lining up for a piece of the action. It was France and the UK who initially led the effort to topple Colonel Muammar Gaddafi. Britain, together with France, sent their navy and fighter jets to establish a sea blockade and assault military targets on Libyan territory. Now the National Transitional Council (NTC) of Libya says its friends will be rewarded – and these are not just words. In the last two weeks, the UK Department for Trade and Industry led a working party to Libya to look around at what needed rebuilding. The British government department estimates that Libyan contracts, in sectors from oil and gas to education and construction, could be worth some $315 billion over the next decade. Oil firms Shell and BP have already held talks with the Libyan transitional government, which pledged to honor the Gaddafi-era contracts with them. Now the NTC delegation is in London to hold talks with top business executives on the “massive opportunity to rebuild Libya.”

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