News24

Liberia police chief fired

2011-11-28 19:34

Monrovia - Liberia's police chief Marc Amblard has been fired after a police shooting at an opposition rally on the eve of elections earlier this month, the presidency said on Monday.

An independent electoral commission set up by President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf to probe the incident, recommended that Amblard be dismissed.

"Mr Amblard accepted the recommendation and stated that although he was not liable for what occurred on November 07, 2011, he accepted responsibility as head of the Liberia National Police," read the statement.

Opposition presidential challenger Winston Tubman called the rally on the eve of an election which he boycotted, claiming a first round which he lost had been riddled with fraud.

Riot police struggled to contain the angry protesters who surged onto the street to hold an unauthorised march, throwing stones, and panic quickly broke out, with police firing teargas and later live bullets into the crowd.

The United Nations Mission in Liberia has said that there were two deaths.

The incident marred the next day's election, which saw Sirleaf re-elected with a whopping 90.7% in the face of Tubman's boycott.

Meanwhile Tubman's Congress for Democratic Change (CDC) announced Monday it had fired its chairperson Geraldine Doe and two other party officials for "getting involved in clandestine operations aimed at damaging the image of the party".

CDC deputy campaign manager George Solo said Doe and two other officials including party spokesman Ahmed Swarray had denied plans to hold a march Monday to protest Sirleaf's re-election.

Throughout the election period CDC party officials have often released contradictory statements.

"These officials of the party had a secret meeting to announce that they are not aware of any march of the CDC. They received money to act as such and we are not joking with these kinds of things. There is no space for traitors in the CDC," said Solo.

The nation's second post-war poll was tipped as a chance to cement a fragile democracy eight years after the end of 14 years of back-to-back civil wars which left some 250 000 dead, but instead deepened divisions.