Talks deadlock over Zimbabwe

2010-06-24 14:33

Tel Aviv - Talks between members of the Kimberley Process diamond certification scheme were deadlocked on Thursday over whether to allow Zimbabwe to resume trade in gems from its controversial Marange fields.

Delegates at a KP conference in Tel Aviv failed during an all-night session to reach consensus over whether to return certification of the fields, which was withdrawn in November over claims of brutal abuse of workers by the army.

Discussions were expected to resume later on Thursday, the Israeli Diamond Industry said in a statement.

A report by KP investigator Abbey Chikane, which was presented at the conference, argued that President Robert Mugabe's government had met the global diamond regulator's criteria in the Marange diamond fields.

"While the majority of countries participating in the Kimberley Process expressed support for Chikane's submission, a number of countries and civil society participants objected to the concept that Zimbabwe would immediately commence exporting diamonds from Marange," the statement said.

Forced labour

Human rights groups have called for Zimbabwe to be suspended from the Kimberley Process, saying it reneged on a promise made in 2009 to improve conditions at its Marange fields. Such a move would bar the country's exports of the gems.

Accreditation of Marange's production was suspended in November after Kimberley investigators documented forced labour, beatings and other abuses by the military against civilians working in the diamond fields.

Human Rights Watch claims soldiers in Marange are engaging in forced labour, torture, beatings, and harassment and that workers, some as young as 11, are forced to hand their finds to military guards, who then sell them on the black market.

Several rights groups say members of Mugabe's Zanu-PF party are implicated in siphoning off the country's diamond revenues.

The Kimberley Process is a joint initiative by governments, industry and civil society to stem the flow of "blood diamonds" - rough diamonds used by rebel movements to finance wars against legitimate governments.

  • Justice - 2010-06-25 07:43

    You see why Zimbabwe does not allow investigators to come in and issue reports, its because if the report does not say what some parties want, it will be rubbished and debated. If that report showed gross human rights abuses I bet it would be splattered all over the internet and debate would have lasted 2 minutes. There are no Human Rights abuses, just a painful reallocation of wealth from European elite to African elite. Sad but true!!!

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