Bavaria scored at least R750 000 in free publicity, says expert

2010-06-29 11:16

Dutch brewery Bavaria scored at least R750 000 in free publicity in

South Africa with its “orange dress” campaign, which was branded by Fifa as

ambush marketing.

Brand and reputation analysis company Ornico said it tracked the

editorial coverage Bavaria received in print and broadcast media in South

Africa.

“The value of the South African newspaper and broadcast news

coverage is R756 728, but this excludes magazine coverage and online coverage,”

Ornico CEO Oresti Patricios said today.

“When the final tally for local publicity is done, it is likely

that Bavaria will have scored well over a R1 million worth of local media

publicity, if not more. That’s not even looking at international coverage, which

has been massive and in all the right media.”

Ornica monitored and analysed every mention of the word “Bavaria”

and then audited the coverage to calculate its advertising value.

“This is the value Bavaria would have paid if they had placed

adverts in the same media that had afforded them coverage,” said

Patricios.

The news value of the event was so compelling that it became an

instant talking point, followed by “overwhelming” media coverage.

“It is irrelevant whether Bavaria staged the spectacle or not.

The

media clearly positioned the Dutch Brewery and the women wearing the bright

orange minis as the heroes of this story.

Fifa was undoubtedly cast as the

villain of the saga,” said Patricios.

Fifa accused the brewery of ambush marketing after a group of more

than 30 women, all dressed in the same orange miniskirts, attended a soccer

World Cup match at Soccer City between the Netherlands and Denmark on June

14.

The minis were handed out in Bavaria gift packs in Holland ahead of

the World Cup.

The women were taken in for questioning and eventually two of them,

whom Fifa accused of being the organisers of the campaign, were arrested.

Barbara Castelein and Mirte Nieuwpoort faced charges of

contravening the Merchandise Marks Act because Bavaria was not an official World

Cup sponsor.

Charges against them were dropped after Bavaria reportedly agreed

not to embark on any ambush marketing for the next 12 years and “to respect the

integrity of Fifa’s commercial programme”.


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