Putin warns West: Russia won’t be blackmailed

2014-10-16 13:50

Multimedia   ·   User Galleries   ·   News in Pictures Send us your pictures  ·  Send us your stories

Belgrade – President Vladimir Putin accused his United States counterpart Barack Obama of a hostile approach towards Russia and has warned in a Cold War-style tirade that Moscow would not be blackmailed by the West over Ukraine.

Putin fired off his combative comments in an interview with a Serbian newspaper, shortly before he arrives in Belgrade today to a hero’s welcome from Russia’s loyal ally.

Belgrade is staging its first military parade in 30 years to mark the 70th anniversary of its liberation from Nazi occupation – an event brought forward by four days to coincide with the visit by the Kremlin strongman.

In some of his most pugnacious comments yet on Russia-US ties, Putin took issue with Obama’s speech at the United Nations General Assembly last month, when he listed “Russia’s aggression” in eastern Ukraine among top global threats, along with Islamic State jihadists and Ebola.

He told the Serbian daily Politika it was “hard to call such an approach anything but hostile”.

“We are hoping our partners will understand the recklessness of attempts to blackmail Russia, [and] remember what discord between large nuclear powers can do to strategic stability,” Putin said.

He branded attempts by the West to isolate Russia over the six-month conflict in Ukraine “a completely absurd, illusory goal” and accused Washington of meddling in his country’s affairs.

Putin, who is set to meet Ukrainian leader Petro Poroshenko in Milan tomorrow, called on Kiev to start nationwide dialogue, saying “a real opportunity has appeared to halt military confrontation, essentially civil war”.

Putin reiterated that Moscow was ready to mend fences with Washington but only if its interests are genuinely taken into account.

Russia is at loggerheads with the West over its annexation of Crimea from Ukraine in March and its support for separatist fighters in the former Soviet country’s eastern belt.

Putin’s predecessor Dmitry Medvedev spearheaded a “reset” in ties with Washington but relations have quickly unravelled since Putin returned to the Kremlin for a third term in 2012.

Russia is now facing its deepest period of Western isolation since the Cold War, with US and European Union sanctions dealing a blow to its already stuttering economy.

Despite the distinct Western diplomatic chill, Putin can count on a warm welcome in Belgrade, which has refused to align with the EU sanctions against Moscow.

Join the conversation!

24.com encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions.

24.com publishes all comments posted on articles provided that they adhere to our Comments Policy. Should you wish to report a comment for editorial review, please do so by clicking the 'Report Comment' button to the right of each comment.

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Inside News24

 
/News

Book flights

Compare, Book, Fly

Traffic Alerts
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Settings

Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.




Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.