‘Segregation’ school an ‘enclave of apartheid thinking’

2015-01-30 07:53

Reports of racial segregation at a private school in Pretoria are a shocking indication of the persistence of racism in post-apartheid South Africa, the Ahmed Kathrada Foundation said today.

“Schools are meant to be laboratories of nation building, not enclaves of outdated apartheid thinking,” the foundation’s director Neeshan Balton said.

“The justification of needing to enable pupils to maintain their cultures is exactly the kind of arguments put forth to justify apartheid, and has no scientific or educational basis,” he said.

Balton congratulated the parents for refusing to accept the “separate but equal” arguments put forth by the school management.

Eye Witness News reported yesterday that Curro Roodeplaat Private School had been accused of assigning pupils to classes based on their race.

According to the report, almost 30 parents at the school reportedly signed a petition demanding an explanation from the school.

Regional manager at Curro Holdings, André Pollard, denied that the school was racially segregating its pupils.

“It is not because we would like to segregate the whites, it is just because of friends. Children are able to make friends with children of their culture,” he told the broadcaster.

Late yesterday, chief executive and founder of Curro Holdings, Dr Chris van der Merwe, said that pupils were integrated across various grades.

“This is done in a manner that fosters a secure learning environment in which all learners can flourish. This principle applies equally across all Curro schools,” he said.

Van der Merwe said that Curro collectively had about 36 000 pupils in their 42 schools, and that 63% of these pupils were black.

“Our philosophy has always been and will continue to be to create accessible education to South Africans from all backgrounds.”

The school had reportedly had a meeting with parents on the matter last night.

According to EWN, parents wanted to know why some classes were made up of only black children, while the white pupils were kept together.

Pollard told the broadcaster that the number of white pupils at the school was very small, therefore the school was trying to keep them together.

Once there were 12 or more white children, they would separate them equally into the classes, he told the broadcaster.

The department of education yesterday expressed concern over the issue and said it would send officials to the school today to ascertain “what happened, how it happened, who was involved and what appropriate steps should be taken,” said Phumla Sekhonyane at the time.

Join the conversation!

24.com encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions.

24.com publishes all comments posted on articles provided that they adhere to our Comments Policy. Should you wish to report a comment for editorial review, please do so by clicking the 'Report Comment' button to the right of each comment.

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Inside News24


Book flights

Compare, Book, Fly

Traffic Alerts
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.


Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.


Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.