Why I’m voting ANC/DA/EFF

2014-05-04 15:00

Three voters tell us why they’ll vote for the ANC, DA and EFF respectively on Wednesday.

‘The EFF speaks to me’

Mduduzi Khumalo spends his days at a spaza shop set up in a shack in Motetema, a township near Groblersdal in Limpopo.

Khumalo (24) and the other young men who while away the hours at Casey Maripane’s shop jokingly call it the headquarters of the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) – the iron sheets, planks and chunks of precast walls that make up the shack are red with the EFF’s election posters.

Nearby is Sekhukhune FET College’s CS Barlow Campus.

Khumalo was studying civil engineering there last year, but had to drop out because his grandmother’s paltry government grant – the family’s only income – was not enough to pay his fees.

Khumalo didn’t vote in the 2009 elections because politics didn’t interest him, but a lot has changed in five years.

He’s fed up with corrupt, greedy politicians, alleged nepotism and job reservation for ANC members in municipalities in the Groblersdal area, and a lack of services like water, sanitation, RDP houses and sporting facilities.

On Wednesday, as a first-time voter, he will mark his cross next to Julius Malema’s face on the ballot.

“The reason is that the EFF’s policies talk directly to the needs of South Africans – equal opportunities in life, free education, job opportunities and service delivery.”

The EFF, he says, has exposed the ANC’s failure to improve the lives of many South Africans.

“When I was still in college, lecturers were selling us drawing equipment and I kept on asking myself: ‘Why is that happening?’ Are poor students not supposed to be assisted to get these things for free?” – Sizwe sama Yende

‘ANC made things better’

When Zinyusile Zithathele voted for the first time, the mood at Qunu Junior Secondary School was “electrifying”.

For starters, he was casting his vote at Nelson Mandela’s old school.

“People were excited. I remember thinking about all those people who lost their lives so that we could vote. Just making that mark was unforgettable.”

Since then, the 78 year old has voted in every national election and will make his mark again for the ANC on Wednesday.

“I will be voting for the ANC like I have been doing all along. I see no other party with better policies and programmes,” he says.

The grandfather of 10 says Qunu has changed, mostly for the better.

“My wife and I get old-age grants and all our grandchildren are supported through the child support grant, which makes a lot of difference in our lives.

“We didn’t have electricity and clean water, but now we do. Madiba helped build schools around Qunu. We can’t pretend nothing’s been done, but there are challenges.

“Today, we have a museum [the Nelson Mandela Museum] down the road where some of our kids are employed.

“There are also recreational facilities for the youth and a functional clinic?–?these things that we have now are tangible and were not there before.”

He is not uncritical of his party, though.

“As much as we support our organisation, we understand the anger by other people because some of these leaders see ANC positions as tickets to riches, which is not good for the longevity of the party.”–?Lubabalo Ngcukana

Voting for DA ‘all the way’

Susan Jantjies (57) shares a two-bedroom house in Voorbrug in Delft, on the Cape Flats, with her teenage son.

Her daughter lives in a “bungalow” in the back yard.

Delft, which is next to the Cape Town International Airport and Khayelitsha, was one of the city’s first multiracial townships.

It contains seven divisions, including Voorbrug, which is predominantly populated by Afrikaans-speaking coloured people.

Jantjies facilitates workshops for The Women’s Circle, which promotes women’s rights in the area. She divorced her husband three years ago because “he just didn’t get my job”.

The plucky mother of four voted for the National Party in 1994 and is now a DA supporter. She speaks openly of her political convictions. “Ja, I voted for [FW] De Klerk’s people in those days.

“You know, way back, Delft was an ANC area. It didn’t work. They would come here and speak isiXhosa and no-one could understand because we’re Afrikaans.”

Jantjies says most people in Voorbrug will vote for the DA on Wednesday. “The DA has done a lot for us. We have parks with trees, our bushes are cut, our rubbish is removed.

“Some people complain, but there will always be people who complain.

“They need to differentiate between national and provincial issues,” she said.

Jantjies is a fan of Western Cape Premier and DA leader Helen Zille. “I was thrilled when Helen became the mayor [of Cape Town]. I respect her as a politician.”?–?Biénne Huisman

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