Malema speaks out about Marikana

By Drum Digital
18 September 2012

Expelled ANC Youth League leader Julius Malema claims police threatened to kill him at Wonderkop Stadium where he was denied entry on Monday.

"Police threatened to isolate us and kill us," Malema told a media briefing in Johannesburg on Tuesday.

"They pushed us out against our will... even though we were invited there to speak."

Police stopped Malema at the gates of the stadium, where striking miners had gathered to be briefed on developments about their wage demands.

After a lengthy discussion with police, Malema drove off, escorted by about 10 police vans.

A police helicopter circled above, while police on foot patrol ran to points of entry at the stadium to stop Malema if he returned.

Malema said after the August 16 shooting, where 34 striking miners were killed, police and civilians carrying weapons should have been disarmed.

He asked why soldiers had been sent to Marikana when there was "no need" for them.

"We are not a rebellious group... We will never lead violence. We will lead a political onslaught against political thugs."

Malema said he did not want to take the lead through a violent coup; "we will do it through political means".

President Jacob Zuma had militarised police "like all dictators" when he took office.

"Jacob Zuma is a liability to South Africa and the ANC.

"Like all dictators, he only concentrates on his village Nkandla."

He said Zuma was only interested in his family, and would plunge the country into a "deeper crisis".

"It's not about a person who sings beautifully and dances nicely," said Malema.

"Zuma is highly compromised... he has got no capacity... maybe in cultural activities..."

Zuma was a "divisive leader who believed in conspiracies".

"He is also too old. He must rest. He is getting older by the day."

Malema said he was never involved in any corrupt activities and had nothing to hide.

"I have nothing to hide... I only have my convictions. Nothing will stop me from fighting for economic freedom, not even my death... We are unshaken."

He said reports about his imminent arrest were not surprising.

He had it "on good authority" that there were instructions "to get rid of some [of] us... The defence minister signed our death warrants".

Referring to Malema, Zuma told Parliament last week that action would be taken against those suspected of inciting violence.

"It is also some people of some description who are going there to instigate miners to operate in a particular way," Zuma said at the time.

"It cannot be accepted. And therefore we are looking into that; we are going to be acting very soon."

Prior to this, Malema told striking miners at Gold Fields near Carletonville not to return to work until their demands were met.

He also called for a national strike to take place once a week, every month.

Workers at Lonmin's Marikana mine downed tools last month, demanding a R12,500 wage increase.

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