Nigerian Church survivors tested for ebola

By Drum Digital
22 September 2014

Born-again businesswoman and Bishop Mpendulo Nkambule’s wife, Zanele Mbokazi-Nkambule tries to shed some light on why people might want to go to the Nigerian church.

By: Thembisile Makgalemele and Nomzamo Ngcobo

At Swartkoppies Airforce Base in Pretoria, where 25 of the survivors arrived, the mood was somber.

Adding insult to injury, the arrivals are in lock-down for the next two days as medical personnel conducted test to check they were free from airborne illness such Ebola, which has killed more than 2,700 people in West Africa.

Social Development deputy minister, Hendrietta Bogopa-Zulu, advised families not to touch, hug or kiss their loved ones who were being decontaminated.

Sadly some of the survivors obtained severe injuries – three had limbs amputated, one developed gangrene, and another sustained kidney failure and is currently on dialyses.

Two siblings, one aged 18 months and the other four years, returned as orphans as both their parents died in the tragedy. The four year old lost an arm in the disaster.

Born-again businesswoman and Bishop Mpendulo Nkambule’s wife, Zanele Mbokazi-Nkambule tries to shed some light on why people might want to go to the Nigerian church.

She says her general observation is that church leaders have different gifts and no one can explain the connection between a person and his/her spiritual shepherd or leader.

“People are drawn to different religious leaders by different things,” she says. “This has nothing to do with local pastors not being adequate or not giving people solutions. In spite of all the theories and debates that are currently taking place, I am convinced that most of the people who went to SCOAN were searching for God, healing, deliverance and answers to their day to day situations.”

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