Satanism cases in township schools

By Drum Digital
24 March 2014

At least two percent of Satanism-related cases have been reported in township schools in South Africa, the SA Democratic Teachers Union (Sadtu) said on Sunday.

"But these are just reported cases. Many cases are not reported," Sadtu's general secretary Mugwena Maluleke said in Sebokeng.

"Gauteng is the worst affected province so far."

This was followed by the Northern Cape and Mpumalanga.

He said the cases were mainly in township schools, but there were signs to look out for.

"Once there's Satanism, there's violence in schools and you will see the level of absenteeism increasing and then there's great social complications," he said.

"You begin to see schools embarking on action against learners who are possessed or displaying characteristics of violence and bullying."

The first action by schools was suspension and then expulsion.

Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga said her department had partnered with Sadtu to raise awareness about religion in schools and government's policy on it.

She said an awareness drive was started in March following the murder of two girls in Dobsonville last month, which was believed to be related to Satanism.

"Since March 8, every day we are in different communities addressing education, religion and morality," said Motshekga.

The campaign would end on April 2.

Thandeka Moganetsi, 15, and Chwayita Rathazayo, 16, were found dead in a field, dressed in George Khoza Secondary School uniforms. They had cuts on their hands and necks. Three black candles and two new razor blades were found at the scene.

The police occult unit was part of the investigating team amid reports that the murders could be linked to Satanism.

Motshekga said schools, townships and young people needed to be educated about religion and government policy on it.

Principals, in particular, needed to know about its policies related to religious beliefs, she said.

Since the Dobsonville murders, Motshekga had received numerous complaints.

"Different priests and religious groups have been complaining about problems in schools about religion, and we are here today to educate people... and clarify government's position on religion," she said.

"Priests have been writing to me. They say the problems are because of government policies."

She did not elaborate on the complaints, but said she wanted the community to be educated on government policy.

-SAPA

Find Love!

Men
Women