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More Opinion and Analysis

DA breaks election rules to play victim

2014-04-14 12:52
(File, Sapa)
Elections is when political parties throw it all in to convince voters where their votes must go. With modern technology, social media, television and all forms of communication are used. Giving well funded parties an advantage.

One of the advantaged political parties is the DA. But its election campaigns always leave the voters they are trying to attack with questions. Really putting into question the effectiveness of its campaigns.

The 2014 Election “Ayisafani” campaign is somewhat different from campaigns the DA had before. Its not awakening and playing with white fears, but its trying to attract black voters, at the same time retaining the white support base.

Core to the 2014 election however is DA’s campaign to play victim, like they always have.

The word “ayisafani” can be translated to “its not longer the same”.

I guess they got this from their Obama Election adviser they hired. The attempt here is to praise Mandela and Mbeki, and attack Zuma.

A disguised DA attempt to portray itself as concerned about an apparent ANC change for the worst.

The “Ayisafani” Campaign deliberately sidelines ASA and I.E.C codes and conducts that regulate electioneering.

This is deliberately done by the DA knowing the ANC will complain, so they can play victim.

The “Nkandla SMS” and the ” Ayisafani TV advert” were deliberate, and I must say, successful attempts of DA playing victim.

I await to hear the judgment on ANC’s appeal on the Nkandla SMS.

It will be interesting to hear what the IEC and ICASA will say about SABC removing Maimane’s “Ayisafani” ad.

In 1994, the DA, then DP ran with the “We don’t have to change our colors” campaign. This put into context with the New National Party which was trying its luck in repositioning itself as a representative of all, not just whites as it did as the National Party.

In 1999, the DA ran with the “fight back” campaign.

Jumping some elections, the DA in 2009 ran with the “stop Zuma” campaign.

The DA’s election campaigning has long been about portraying itself as a victim, creating and perpetuating fear and sometimes playing with already existing fear of “blacks” amongst those they consider their core support; the white constituency.

By stating they don’t have to change their colors in 1994, they told their support base that they remain a white minority party.

The same DA told its supporters to “take back your city” in its campaign for Western Cape Local Government elections in 2006.

That and the “fight back” campaign in 1999 general elections effectively denoted whites as sole owners of the City of Cape Town. So whites had to take back their city from blacks and fight back against the Blacks so the DA campaign suggested.

The “Stop Zuma” campaign was not only playing with white fears of another Black ANC president, but it was a start of DA’s anti-Zuma centralized campaign.

They praise Mandela yet when he ran for presidency they told voters that as the DA (then DP) they don’t have to change their colors, they remain white and had to be voted for, instead of a black Mandela.

When Mbeki ran for presidency, they told its supporters to fight back. Fight back the black majority government.

So we know their attempt to portray themselves as genuine sympathizers of a changed ANC are just another marketing attempt to win votes.

This article was first published on News24 Voices.
Read more on: anc  |  da  |  helen zille  |  politics  |  elections 2014  |  campaigns

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