Global march against canned hunting

2014-03-05 09:06

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Johannesburg - People from 44 cities around the world, "from Stockholm to Sao Paulo, Vancouver to Melbourne, and Hong Kong to Cape Town" will be marching against lion trophies in the growing canned hunting industry.

The march was initiated by South African wildlife activists and will be held on 15 March.

Animal advocacy group Cach (Campaign against Canned Hunting) said they were lobbying the South African government to ban canned hunting.

"Somewhere around a thousand people [are] expected to attend the march in Cape Town next Saturday", said Cach director Chris Mercer.

"I'm angry by the pampered trophy hunters who come to South Africa for no other reason than to torture and kill hand-reared lions."

A canned hunt is a trophy hunt in which lions are kept in a confined area (fenced in) so that the hunter can obtain a kill.

Bred for the bullet

In South Africa, former environmental affairs minister Marthinus van Schalkwyk had announced laws to stop the practise of canned hunting because he was sickened by wealthy tourists shooting tame lions from the back of a truck and felling rhino with a bow and arrow.

In 2007, canned hunting was banned in South Africa but the SA predator association appealed it and in 2011 won its case in the supreme court of appeal.

Cache said there were fewer than 4000 lions left in the wild in South Africa, but more than 8000 in captivity, allegedly being bred for the "bullet or the arrow".

"Lion farming is a real threat to wild lion prides, for many reasons. The on-going capture of wild lions to introduce fresh blood into captive breeding, and the growth of the lion bone trade to Asia will impact severely on wild lions from poaching", it said on its website.

It blamed canned hunting on government, which it claimed "is ferociously defended by wealthy vested interests".

"Canned hunting can only be abolished by a sustained campaign to raise awareness and to change policy. Then an informed public must persuade US and European Union governments to ban the import of lion/predator trophies."

Cach said lion cubs were bred in captivity and raised to adulthood for trophy-hunters to shoot them dead.

Marchers in Cape Town were expected to hand over a memorandum to government officials next Saturday.

To learn more about canned hunting in South Africa click here.

Read more on:    eu  |  johannesburg  |  animals  |  hunting

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