UN: 2013 extreme events due to climate change

2014-03-25 10:25


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Geneva - The head of the UN weather agency blamed extreme weather on human-induced climate change on Monday, citing key events that wreaked havoc in Asia, Europe, the US and Pacific region last year.

Michel Jarraud, secretary-general of the World Meteorological Organisation, said his agency's annual assessment of the global climate shows how dramatically people and lands everywhere felt the impacts of extreme weather such as droughts, heat waves, floods and tropical cyclones.

"Many of the extreme events of 2013 were consistent with what we would expect as a result of human-induced climate change", he said.

The UN agency called 2013 the sixth-warmest year on record. Thirteen of the 14 warmest years have occurred in the 21st century.

A rise in sea levels is leading to increasing damage from storm surges and coastal flooding, as demonstrated by Typhoon Haiyan, Jarraud said. The typhoon in killed at least 6 100 people and caused $13bn in damage to the Philippines and Vietnam.

Australia, meanwhile, had its hottest year on record and parts of central Asia and central Africa also notched record highs.

Jarraud drew special attention to studies and climate modelling examining Australia's recent heat waves, saying the high temperatures there would have been virtually impossible without the emissions of heat-trapping carbon dioxide from the burning of coal, oil and gas.

He cited other costly weather disasters such as $22bn damage from central European flooding in June, $10bn in damage from Typhoon Fitow in China and Japan, and a $10bn drought in much of China.

Only a few places were cooler than normal. Among them was the central US.

Jarraud also cited frigid polar air in parts of Europe and the southeast US, and the widest tornado ever observed over rural areas of central Oklahoma, as being among extreme weather events.

There were $41bn weather disasters in the world last year, the second highest number behind only 2010, according to insurance firm Aon Benfield, which tracks global disasters.

Jarraud spoke as top climate scientists and representatives from about 100 governments with the UN's intergovernmental panel on climate change met in Japan to complete their latest report on climate change's impact.
Read more on:    un  |  philippines  |  us  |  china  |  typhoon haiyan  |  environment  |  climate change

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