Dutch want to grow human embryos for 'limited' research

2016-05-28 09:15
(iStock)

(iStock)

Multimedia   ·   User Galleries   ·   News in Pictures Send us your pictures  ·  Send us your stories

The Hague - The Dutch government on Friday announced it wants to allow growing human embryos "under strict and limited conditions" for scientific research, thereby giving hope to parents struggling to conceive.

Dutch Health Minister Edith Schippers "wants to allow the creation of embryos for scientific research - and under very strict conditions to give people the possibility of [healthy] children", the health ministry said in a statement.

"The research has to do with infertility, artificial reproduction techniques and hereditary or congenital diseases," the statement added.

It also specifically included people who became infertile after being treated for cancer at an early age.

The Netherlands will change its laws on embryonic research, which until now only allowed tests to be conducted on leftover embryos procured from in vitro fertilisation processes.

The so-called "14-day rule" - which says that human embryos cannot be cultured in the lab for more than two weeks - will also still strictly be adhered to, the statement said.

"Until now the ban on the cultivation of embryos have hampered research which could help with the treatment of diseases on the short to medium-long term," it added.

This included various hereditary illnesses such as mitochondrial diseases, which affect cells in the body.

Britain this year granted its first research licence to genetically modify human embryos to a project that will help women who battle to fall pregnant.

The decision made Britain one of the first countries in the world to grant this type of authorisation on one of science's new frontiers and follows months of deliberation by the country's embryology regulator.

US-based scientists earlier this month reported they had grown human embryos in the lab for nearly two weeks, for the first time challenging the 14-day rule simply because no one had succeeded in keeping the embryos alive for that long.

The scientists then destroyed the embryos in order to avoid breaching the two-week limit.

Read more on:    us  |  uk  |  netherlands  |  research

Join the conversation!

24.com encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions.

Inside News24

 
/News

Book flights

Compare, Book, Fly

Traffic Alerts
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Settings

Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.




Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.