Last hurrah for Rosetta space probe

2016-06-30 23:02
Rosetta flew into space more than a decade ago and had to perform a series of complex manoeuvres to gain enough speed to chase down comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on its orbit around the sun. (Boris Roessler, AP, dpa)

Rosetta flew into space more than a decade ago and had to perform a series of complex manoeuvres to gain enough speed to chase down comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on its orbit around the sun. (Boris Roessler, AP, dpa)

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Berlin - After a journey lasting 12 years, a date has been set for the comet-chasing spacecraft Rosetta's last hurrah.

The European Space Agency announced on Thursday that the probe will end its 8 billion kilometre odyssey on September 30 by crash-landing on the comet named 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. There it will join its sidekick Philae, the lander that touched down on the icy surface of the comet nearly two years ago.

The final descent will require careful manoeuvring and offer a unique opportunity to take close-up images of the comet before Rosetta hits the ground at about 1.8kp/h.

"Although we'll do the best job possible to keep Rosetta safe until then, we know from our experience of nearly two years at the comet that things may not go quite as we plan," said mission manager Patrick Martin. "This is the ultimate challenge for our teams and for our spacecraft, and it will be a very fitting way to end the incredible and successful Rosetta mission."

After being launched in 2004, Rosetta took 10 years to accelerate and catch up with comet 67P. In November 2014 it released Philae, achieving the first landing of a spacecraft on a comet.

Scientists decided to steer Rosetta onto 67P because it's unlikely to survive a lengthy hibernation as the comet heads away from the sun toward the orbit of Jupiter, starving the probe's solar panels of light.

"We're trying to squeeze as many observations in as possible before we run out of solar power," said Matt Taylor, Rosetta project scientist.

Data from Rosetta and Philae have already improved scientists' understanding of the nature of comets and the role they played in the early universe. Analysing the data fully is expected to keep researchers busy for years, said Taylor.


Read more on:    germany  |  space

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