PLEASE NOTE:

MyNews24 is a user-generated section of News24.com. The stories here come from users.

 
sophylowizzy
 
Comments: 1
Article views: 1161
 
 
Latest Badges:

 
View all sophylowizzy's badges.
 

Sexual violence in South Africa

11 October 2013, 10:23

The rate of sexual violence in South Africa is among the highest in the world, second only to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Sexual violence is the use of force or manipulation to get someone to engage in unwanted sexual activity without his or her consent. An estimated of 500,000 rape cases take place in the country, every year.

According to the report by the (United Nations Office on Crimes and Drugs) for the period 1998–2000, South Africa was ranked first for rapes per capita. In 1998, one in three of the 4,000 women questioned in Johannesburg was raped, according to Community Information, Empowerment and Transparency (CIET) Africa. While women's groups in South Africa estimate that a woman is raped every 26 seconds, the South African police estimate that a woman is raped every 36 seconds.

 More than 25% of a sample of 1,738 South African men from the KwaZulu-Natal and Eastern Cape Provinces admitted to raping someone when anonymously questioned; of these, nearly half said” they had raped more than one person”, according to a non-peer reviewed policy brief issued by the( Medical Research Council) MRC. Several news publications wrongly reasons these results to the rest of the South African population, given reported rape prevalence several times higher in the two provinces in question than i.e. in Mpumalanga or Northern Province. Nearly three out of four men who admitted rape stated they had first forced a woman or girl into sex before the age of 20, and nearly one in ten admitted doing so before the age of 10. A survey from the (comprehensive study) "Rape in South Africa" from 2000 indicated that 2,1% of women aged 16 years or more across population groups reported that they had been sexually abused at least once between the beginning of 1993 and March 1998, results which seem to stark conflict the MRC survey results. Similarly "The South African demographic and health survey of 1998" gave results of rape prevalence at 4,0% all women aged between 15 and 49 years in the sampled households (a survey also)

 On Valentine’s Day, when the world celebrates the positive aspects of sexual love, it is beyond disturbing to realize that, by the time you have read this article, at least two women will have been raped in South Africa. That is because, on average, a woman is raped every four minutes in the country. In South Africa our Constitution protects the right of women to live free from violence. Our government has also signed a number of regional and international conventions agreeing to uphold these same rights and duties.

Rape Crisis people know that the prevalence of rape is much greater than those cases that are reported to the South Africa Police Service (SAPS). This fact is backed up by scientific studies conducted by the South African Medical Research Council (MRC). The barriers to reporting rape are many. For the survivor of rape these barriers include the horror of being forced to relive the trauma of the rape every time she speaks about it, the shame of what other people will think, how they will judge her behaviour before they judge the behavior of the rapist, the pain it will cause her mother, her father, her friends, her husband or girlfriend or lover, the fact that the rapist and his friends or family or gang will offer her threats or bribes to drop the case and, perhaps the reason closest to our vision as an organization, the fact that she has little faith in the South African criminal justice system to support her in seeing that justice is done. Perhaps if this system recognized their rights more fully then more rape survivors would report or disclose these attacks.

The fact is, rape is entirely commonplace in all our cultures. It is part of the fabric of everyday life, yet we all act as if it's something shocking and extraordinary whenever it hits the headlines. We remain silent, and so we condone it. The three of us deal with this issue in different ways every day of our lives, yet we too are guilty of protesting articulately outside but leaving it on the other side of the door when we sit down to dinner with our families. Until rape, and the structures – sexism, inequality, tradition – that make it possible, are part of our dinner-table conversation with the next generation, it will continue. Is it polite and comfortable to talk about it? No. Must we anyway? Yes.

Disclaimer: All articles and letters published on MyNews24 have been independently written by members of News24's community. The views of users published on News24 are therefore their own and do not necessarily represent the views of News24. News24 editors also reserve the right to edit or delete any and all comments received.

 

24.com publishes all comments posted on articles provided that they adhere to our Comments Policy. Should you wish to report a comment for editorial review, please do so by clicking the 'Report Comment' button to the right of each comment.

Comment on this story
1 comment
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Submitted by
Tafi Mhaka
Julius Malema: The Friendly Ghost...

When Mmusi Maimane found his leadership both overshadowed and outshone by the Twitter antics of former DA leader Helen Zille, who helped save the day ? Julius Malema. Read more...

0 comments 134 views
Submitted by
Graham Sell
STOP; BREATHE; THINK; ACT

We are being led by the nose. We are so busy reacting to the latest outrages, perpetrated by our own government, that we are losing or have already lost our ability to think clearly. Read more...

0 comments 110 views
Submitted by
Alleyne Smith
Finding the cure for exhaustion

I'm exhausted! With every development around #GuptaLeaks, President Zuma and state capture, my level of exhaustion with what is happening in this country grows.  Read more...

0 comments 98 views
Submitted by
Sanele Sano Ngcobo
Why are they opposing National He...

We can’t once again postpone NHI, all lives matters. Students demanded free education, don’t be surprised when the next target is high quality healthcare for all.  Read more...

0 comments 817 views
Submitted by
Lisa Marcelle Hold
Youth Day 2017 - the sad reality

I have faith in our youth and I have the privilege of dealing with many young people of all races on a daily basis. Read more...

0 comments 149 views
Submitted by
Samantha Napo
State of our youth, state of our ...

As we await the next significant public holiday, let’s take the opportunity to think about our future and how we contribute to its significance. Read more...

0 comments 104 views
 

services

E-mail Alerts The latest headlines in your inbox

RSS feeds News delivered really simply.

Mobile News24 on your mobile or PDA

E-mail Newsletters You choose what you want

News24 on Android Get the latest from News24 on your Android device.

SMS Alerts Get breaking news stories via SMS.

TV Get us in your home, on your television.

 
Interactive Advertising Bureau
 
© 2017 24.com. All rights reserved.
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Settings

Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.




Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.