News24

Dirty socks could help fight malaria

2011-07-13 11:32

Montreal - The odour of dirty socks can be used to lure mosquitoes into a deadly trap before they can spread malaria, a US and Canadian-funded researcher based in Africa said.

Dr Fredros Okumu, of the Ifakara Health Institute in Tanzania, discovered through an experiment that mosquitoes were more attracted to the odour of filthy feet than to live humans sleeping in the same area.

"We had an experimental house with a human being sleeping inside and a second experimental house with a synthetic mixture," he said by telephone.

"We realised that we were getting four times more mosquitoes going into the house with [the] synthetic mixture," which, when doused with insecticide, killed the bugs.

"When mosquitoes are crossing the compound, they sense something that they think it is a human being. They attempt to bite that person or that device and... instead of getting blood they get killed."

'Bold idea'

His findings have earned him a $775 000 grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Canadian NGO Grand Challenges to install the devices in a number of Tanzanian villages to measure their effect on public health.

The devices are to be placed outside homes in order to complement life-saving nets and repellents.

"We were attracted to that idea because it is a bold idea, it's creative, it's innovative," said Peter Singer, CEO of Grand Challenges Canada.

"Who would have thought that a life-saving technology could be lurking in your laundry basket?"

Malaria claimed 781 000 lives in 2009, according to the UN's World Health Organisation (WHO), which is heading efforts to distribute insecticide-treated mosquito nets and to spray reproduction sites.

About 90% of malaria deaths each year occur in Africa and 92% of those are children aged under 5.

Other mosquito-borne diseases include dengue, which sickens around 50 million people each year, yellow fever, filariasis and West Nile virus.

Comments
  • Bok Fan - 2011-07-13 12:08

    Hmmmm so my son's fermenting rugby socks may have an actual cash value.

  • jowza - 2011-07-13 12:15

    now we know why the english dont have malaria

      Currie_Mafia - 2011-07-13 12:36

      or many friends for that matter...

  • whatno - 2011-07-13 12:29

    More like the worry every mother has that their child(ren) often get ill but so much care is taken that they & the surroundings are always clean. yet those kids that dont get such care never get sick. Just a thought, nthing serious.

  • DAB - 2011-07-13 12:35

    When going to a malaria risk area, make sure you take a friend with that doesn't bath, that way the mozzies will be attracted to him and will rather bite him.

  • Amera - 2011-07-13 12:36

    This is too funny!

  • IandI - 2011-07-13 12:43

    "The odour of dirty socks can be used to lure mosquitoes into a deadly trap". Wish we could use the same to get rid of politicians

  • daaivark - 2011-07-13 12:50

    Oh my. My son's room as a malaria trap. I can see clearly now.

  • Jesse - 2011-07-13 17:46

    See: http://www.physorg.com/news175795826.html The main chemical is nonanal which works with carbon dioxide to attract mosquitoes to animals. Nonanal and other chemicals similar to nonanal are found in dirty socks.

  • johncarlos.biza - 2011-07-14 10:32

    Nice to see African nations finding their own solutions to their problems.

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