News24

Man jailed for hacking, child porn

2011-07-13 09:26

St Paul - A man has been sentenced to 18 years in prison for hacking into his neighbours' wireless network and framing them for distributing child pornography and e-mail threats against Vice President Joe Biden and other officials.

Barry Ardolf, of Blaine, Minnesota, received the sentence on Tuesday in federal court in St Paul.

In a plea agreement in December, the 46-year-old Ardolf admitted using the hacked network to send sexually explicit e-mails - including one containing child pornography - to his neighbour's co-workers.

He also sent threats to Biden and other public officials, signing them with the neighbour's name. He was indicted on the charges in June 2010.

Minnesota Public Radio reported Donald Oswald of the Minneapolis FBI released a statement saying Ardolf's apparent motive was "to ruin the victim's reputation and livelihood".

Comments
  • JadedKnight - 2011-07-13 10:34

    What a scumbag.

  • BAH - 2011-07-13 10:51

    Hell, nutjob! I also don't like some people in my life but that is EXTREME! My WLAN shall now be monitored carefully and switched off during the day. Something like this will ruin your life for sure....

  • scottdavies123 - 2011-07-13 11:05

    If your wireless network is not secured (preferably with WPA/WPA2 security), then you are being very cavalier and careless and opening yourself up to at the very least bandwidth theft.

      1gascan - 2011-07-13 12:43

      Scott, I hate to tell you this, but WPA/WPA2-PSK are just as useless. All people using wireless networks should not even broadcast their S-ID's, as this is a loophole into the wireless network. The only way to really secure your home network, is to use cables, and if you are forced to use wireless, change the password on a daily basis - especially if there is sensitive data. Ask any organization that uses wireless technology (that have had security audits) how frequently their passwords are required to change. Granted, your comment is useful to those who do not understand the full extent of wireless security, and will deter attacks unless the hacker is adamant that they will get into your network.

      JJ - 2011-07-13 13:10

      Meh, get a wifi adapter with packet injection and BackTrack. ;) WPA is useless. Think you should be able to crack it within 10 000 packets.

  • Johan van Zyl - 2011-07-13 11:08

    Moral of the story: protect your wireless network with a strong password. And if you are really paranoid, you can only allow connections from MAC addresses from you own little secret white list. Hack that buddy!

      1gascan - 2011-07-13 12:47

      @Johan - see my comment above to Scott. Long passwords are useless on any encryption method - it can be hacked within seconds with the correct software. You are correct in saying that MAC addresses can be filtered, but there are ways around this too. Remember - a MAC address is transmitted via the wireless connection between the two devices - intercepting this and changing numbers is quite possible. Unfortunately there is only so much one can do to protect everything. The hackers always find a way around it.

      HadEnuf - 2011-07-13 12:53

      @Johan & Scott - I still use WEP, but I have enabled the ACL containing MAC addresses of trusted devices. Is that adequate ?

      JJ - 2011-07-13 13:11

      Try MAC address spoofing.

      1gascan - 2011-07-13 13:38

      @HadEnuf - WEP has a poor key structure repetition - your encryption key can be detected in a matter of seconds on WEP. WEP is much weaker than WPA/WPA2, but those are also hackable. As per JJ's comments, MAC spoofing is used to work around a list of "trusted" MAC addresses. It is quite possible for a device to spoof an address of a trusted advice and gain access to the "secure wireless network".

      HadEnuf - 2011-07-13 19:21

      Thanks - quite scary actually, so if someone wants to crack into your network, they will. Fortunately two of my neighbours are complete retards and the other one probably doesn't own a PC, so I'll check for the shady dude parked in the street.

      1gascan - 2011-07-14 06:38

      @HadEnuf - No worries. Yup, if someone really wants to get in, they will. Hahaha @retards - it is from the people you least expect it! ;) You can also purchase wireless antennae that propagate signals for a limited distance, so if you are lucky enough to own a home with a large garden, a 10m radius should do it. Most wireless network routers are either 802.11g/n specification (g being the older of the two technologies). G has a range of about +-20m and N has a range of +-70m (that is with obstructions i.e. indoors). The range for these devices will be further outdoors. Again, it is really unlikely that the "shady"" dude will waste his time sitting in the street trying to hack a home network unless there is really something he wants from your network, or if he intends on doing some malicious damage. I am not saying its not possible that it will happen - it is just less likely - they tend to go for business networks. Have a good one :)

  • pages:
  • 1