Gogos take to the warm oven Never too old to bake tasty bread It’s so true that someone learns until they die “

2015-08-27 06:01

At a time when senior citizens are expected to take their feet off the accelerator and enjoy the remainder of their years; not so for a group of highly active Gogos in Khayelitsha.

For the lot are now part of the Neighbourhood Old Age Homes(Noah), and boy, they have taken to baking like dough to oven.

Previously relying only on state grants for their income, they will now be supplementing that with Noah Loaves, a project launched last Friday morning.

Without the luxury of a nest egg, and with the unemployment rate among the youth very high, the project has come as a God-send to them.

This project will make sure that the elderly never want for basic necessities.

CompetitionSponsored by the Ackerman Pick n Pay Foundation, it gives Noah members the opportunity to bake bread for sale to their communities as well as for their own use.

Proceeds from the sale of the bread will go to the individual bakers with a 30% contribution to the two Noah centres situatewd in Woodstock and Khayelitsha.

At the launch, 13 bakers competed against each other in three categories: White bread with raising agent, brown bread and white bread. The winning bread recipes will be used by all bakers in the project.

One of the judges, Jana van Sittert, said the loaves made for the competition were delicious in different ways.

“They all put amazing effort in. However, there were three things that we were looking for: The crust, taste and the texture of the bread. We had to make sure that the bread was crusty enough, we tasted the flavour of the bread and whether it was of good texture, not overbaked or underbaked.”

Billy Schlosz,67, and Roger Berry,68, both Noah Woodstock residents, were crowned the winners of the brown bread category.

They knew their nutty wheat and honey loaf was the winning one, they said.

Exciting project“We are excited. We were up against the experts. I haven’t made this bread in 25 years but I had no doubt it is the winning one. We are happy about the whole thing and it was a team effort so we did all that had to be done.”

Beauty Hlomendlini,65, said it was an exciting project. “It’s so true that someone learns until they die. As old as I am I’m still learning and I’m so happy. We are very grateful for this opportunity, it will also help our families. This is such a life-changing opportunity and it came when we never thought,” she said.

The Noah organisation has supported state pensioners for over 34 years by enabling them to live happy and socially and financially contributing lives. To improve the organisation’s sustainability and to enable its clinic members, club members and residents to make extra income, Noah has embarked on a number of social enterprise initiatives.

Leonora Sauls, head of the Ackerman Pick n Pay Foundation, said it supported such initiatives as it promoted sustainability and food security.

“We are glad that such projects address the shortages of jobs and food and we really try and help out so that people will go back to trying to feed themselves and produce food for the communities,” she said.

Many times pensioners are expected to take their feet off the accelerator and enjoy what they have worked for.

However, not all of them are so lucky to be resting on money that they worked for over the years – they have to rely on state social grants which do not cover all their needs.

To make sure that the elderly have their own money in their pockets and they don’t sit and do nothing, Neighbourhood Old Age Homes (Noah) officially launched its “Noah loaves” project on Friday morning.

This project, sponsored by the Ackerman Pick n Pay Foundation, gives Noah members in Woodstock and Khayelitsha the opportunity to bake bread for sale to their communities as well as for their own use.

Proceeds from the sale of the bread will go to the individual bakers with a 30% contribution to the two Noah centres.

At the launch 13 bakers competed against each other in three categories: White bread with raising agent, brown bread and white bread. The winning bread recipes will be used by all bakers in the project.

One of the judges, Jana van Sittert, said the loaves made for the competition were delicious in different ways.

“They all put amazing effort in and it wasn’t easy for us to judge. However, there were three things that we were looking for: The crust, taste and the texture of the bread. We had to make sure that the bread was crusty enough, we tasted the flavour of the bread and whether it was of good texture, not overbaked or underbaked.”

Mom’s recipeBilly Schlosz (67) and Roger Berry (68), both Noah Woodstock residents, were crowned the winners of the brown bread category. They knew their nutty wheat and honey loaf was the winning one, they said.

“This is my mother’s recipe,” said Schlosz. “We are excited. We were up against the experts. I haven’t made this bread in 25 years but I had no doubt it is the winning one. We are happy about the whole thing and it was a team effort so we did all that had to be done.”

Another competitor, Beauty Hlomendlini (65) from Noah Khayelitsha, said it was an exciting project.

“It’s so true that someone learns until they die. As old as I am I’m still learning and I’m so happy. We are very grateful for this opportunity, it will also help our families. This is such a life-changing opportunity and it came when we never thought,” she said.

Food securityThe Noah organisation has supported state pensioners for over 34 years by enabling them to live happy and socially and financially contributing lives. To improve the organisation’s sustainability and to enable its clinic members, club members and residents to make extra income, Noah has embarked on a number of social enterprise initiatives.

Leonora Sauls, head of the Ackerman Pick n Pay Foundation, said it supported such initiatives as it promoted sustainability and food security.

“We are glad that such projects address the shortages of jobs and food and we really try and help out so that people will go back to trying to feed themselves and produce food for the communities,” she said

Join the conversation!

24.com encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions.
NEXT ON NEWS24X

24.com publishes all comments posted on articles provided that they adhere to our Comments Policy. Should you wish to report a comment for editorial review, please do so by clicking the 'Report Comment' button to the right of each comment.

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Inside News24

 
PARTNER CONTENT
INFOGRAPHIC: New thinking required for retirement

Everything we believe about retirement is fast becoming outdated.

PARTNER CONTENT
WATCH: How education can change a life

A university education gives students the chance to create a better future for themselves, their families and to opportunity achieve their dreams.

/News

Book flights

Compare, Book, Fly

Traffic Alerts
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Settings

Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.




Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.