Toddlers are safest in child seats

2015-06-23 06:01


adjusted key visual motif summer,

PHOTO: 
Quickpic

adjusted key visual motif summer, PHOTO: Quickpic

Multimedia   ·   User Galleries   ·   News in Pictures Send us your pictures  ·  Send us your stories

The new child seat regulations for South Africa are an important step towards reducing traffic-related injuries and deaths.

The new regulation to the National Road Traffic Act introduced by minister Dipuo Peters aims to protect young children.

As of 1 May, it stipulates that all children under the age of three must be strapped into a child car seat when travelling in any car. Previously it was not compulsory for them to wear seatbelts or be buckled into a suit­able safety or restraint system.

According to the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC), road traffic accidents are the leading cause of injury or death among children under the age of five, with most of these children not buckled up at the time.

SAMRC reports that South Africa has among the highest number of road deaths in the world, with an estimated 17 000 deaths each year. And for each of these deaths, it is reported that around four people are seriously injured.

According to research by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States, strapping babies into appropriate car seats reduces the risk of their death in car crashes by 71%. The risk of death is halved for toddlers between one and four years old if they are properly strapped in.

Booster seats also cut the risk of serious injury in half for children aged between four and eight years, compared to seatbelt use alone, the CDC reports.

“South Africa has a sophisticated road network and some of the latest vehicle technologies, yet we have a tragic number of road injuries and deaths each year,” says Niel Langner, marketing manager for a well-known tyre brand.

“We applaud and fully support the department of transport for introducing this essential new legislation, which should help reduce the loss of lives, particularly amongst young children. However, it needs to be vigorously implemented and enforced by the traffic authorities, along with the existing regulations that require all vehicle occupants to be strapped in at all times.”

– Quickpic


Join the conversation!

24.com encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions.
NEXT ON NEWS24X

24.com publishes all comments posted on articles provided that they adhere to our Comments Policy. Should you wish to report a comment for editorial review, please do so by clicking the 'Report Comment' button to the right of each comment.

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Inside News24

 
PARTNER CONTENT
How much food do you need to concentrate?

We have been taught that we need three meals a day in order to make it through the day and while most of us indulge in more than our fair share there is a large portion of South Africans who are living off barely enough to sustain them.

/World

Book flights

Compare, Book, Fly

Traffic Alerts
Traffic
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Settings

Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.




Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.