Locals don’t want water plant close by

2017-09-05 06:00

As the council plans emergency measures to help with the drought, locals have raised objections to having a desalination plant on their doorstep.

The City of Cape Town is planning a temporary desalination plant in Granger Bay, along with ones at Koeberg, Silverstroom, Woodbridge Island, Hout Bay, Red Hill, Strandfontein, Monwabisi and Harmony Park, which will provide an estimated 50m litres water a day.

A desalination barge based in the Cape Town harbour is set to provide a further 50m litres a day.

However, in a newsletter to members, the Mouille Point Ratepayers’ Association has raised concerns over the placement of the plant at Granger Bay, saying the bulk of the infrastructure is close to residences.

The association says it is in the process of “trying to engage with [councillors] about the possibility of relocating this plant to another area where it is not adjacent to residential blocks of flats and homes”.

“We understand that desalination plants can be noisy, due to pumps and generators, and to have this one in such close proximity to a residential area is far from ideal. While we totally understand the water crisis, we believe that further investigation needs to be done to identify an alternative site.”

In a letter to the City on behalf of some body corporates in Mouille Point, concerns are raised that the City has not adequately consulted residents. The letter also required the City to confirm if environmental authorisation had been sought.

The water intake area would be near the Oceana Power Boat Club, with pipes along Beach Road to carry the sea water to the plant. Outlet pipes for waste would be along the promenade to the sewerage plant. Desalinated water would be directed via pipes to the City’s water supply, confirms City spokesperson Priya Reddy.

“For the marine intake a number of options were identified either within or in the vicinity of Oceana Power Boat Club. Tenderers are encouraged to inspect the site and surrounding areas in order to ensure suitability of the proposed site. Tenderers are responsible for validating proposed routes,” she says.

The pump station is intended to be installed in the Oceana Yacht Club’s harbour and would consist of submersible pump sets installed on the still water side of the breakwater wall, Reddy says.

“The layout and configuration of the installation and equipment orientation shall consider required free passages and space for repairs and maintenance of the equipment, including the handling of the respective equipment. The installation shall provide for suitable anchors and mounting platforms to ensure that rough ocean conditions will not damage the equipment and to accommodate the variation in the tidal water levels.”

The plant will operate on sea water reverse osmosis and is expected to be in place for two years, says Reddy.

Any dust or excess noise from the site will be monitored and fines will be issued if there are any transgressions, Reddy adds.

“There may be initial construction noise, noise coming from vehicles, generators on site.”

Granger Bay is one of the first three sites to get a desalination plant, Reddy says.

“We have been careful to look at potential sites where multiple communities across Cape Town can help to share the load of this absolutely vital intervention. The Cape Town coast is rugged and the rough seas make the location of temporary desalination plants tricky,” she says.

“The sites have been chosen after much overall examination. The temporary desalination plants cannot be situated only in one area. The whole of Cape Town is affected by the drought crisis and thus, all of our communities are asked to accept their important role in helping the City to navigate this drought crisis.”

Reddy adds: “We will attempt to communicate with members of the public as much as possible during this time and we ask residents to stand with us and to be constructive partners. The establishment of these temporary plants is vital for our sustainability as a city and it must be done.”

As the council plans emergency measures to help with the drought, locals have raised objections to having a desalination plant on their doorstep.

The City of Cape Town is planning a temporary desalination plant in Granger Bay, along with ones at Koeberg, Silverstroom, Woodbridge Island, Hout Bay, Red Hill, Strandfontein, Monwabisi and Harmony Park, which will provide an estimated 50m litres water a day.

A desalination barge based in the Cape Town harbour is set to provide a further 50m litres a day.

However, in a newsletter to members, the Mouille Point Ratepayers’ Association has raised concerns over the placement of the plant at Granger Bay, saying the bulk of the infrastructure is close to residences.

The association says it is in the process of “trying to engage with [councillors] about the possibility of relocating this plant to another area where it is not adjacent to residential blocks of flats and homes”.

“We understand that desalination plants can be noisy, due to pumps and generators, and to have this one in such close proximity to a residential area is far from ideal. While we totally understand the water crisis, we believe that further investigation needs to be done to identify an alternative site.”

In a letter to the City on behalf of some body corporates in Mouille Point, concerns are raised that the City has not adequately consulted residents. The letter also required the City to confirm if environmental authorisation had been sought.

The water intake area would be near the Oceana Power Boat Club, with pipes along Beach Road to carry the sea water to the plant. Outlet pipes for waste would be along the promenade to the sewerage plant. Desalinated water would be directed via pipes to the City’s water supply, confirms City spokesperson Priya Reddy.

“For the marine intake a number of options were identified either within or in the vicinity of Oceana Power Boat Club. Tenderers are encouraged to inspect the site and surrounding areas in order to ensure suitability of the proposed site. Tenderers are responsible for validating proposed routes,” she says.

The pump station is intended to be installed in the Oceana Yacht Club’s harbour and would consist of submersible pump sets installed on the still water side of the breakwater wall, Reddy says.

“The layout and configuration of the installation and equipment orientation shall consider required free passages and space for repairs and maintenance of the equipment, including the handling of the respective equipment. The installation shall provide for suitable anchors and mounting platforms to ensure that rough ocean conditions will not damage the equipment and to accommodate the variation in the tidal water levels.”

The plant will operate on sea water reverse osmosis and is expected to be in place for two years, says Reddy.

Any dust or excess noise from the site will be monitored and fines will be issued if there are any transgressions, Reddy adds.

“There may be initial construction noise, noise coming from vehicles, generators on site.”

Granger Bay is one of the first three sites to get a desalination plant, Reddy says.

“We have been careful to look at potential sites where multiple communities across Cape Town can help to share the load of this absolutely vital intervention. The Cape Town coast is rugged and the rough seas make the location of temporary desalination plants tricky,” she says.

“The sites have been chosen after much overall examination. The temporary desalination plants cannot be situated only in one area. The whole of Cape Town is affected by the drought crisis and thus, all of our communities are asked to accept their important role in helping the City to navigate this drought crisis.”

Reddy adds: “We will attempt to communicate with members of the public as much as possible during this time and we ask residents to stand with us and to be constructive partners. The establishment of these temporary plants is vital for our sustainability as a city and it must be done.”

As the council plans emergency measures to help with the drought, locals have raised objections to having a desalination plant on their doorstep.

The City of Cape Town is planning a temporary desalination plant in Granger Bay, along with ones at Koeberg, Silverstroom, Woodbridge Island, Hout Bay, Red Hill, Strandfontein, Monwabisi and Harmony Park, which will provide an estimated 50m litres water a day.

A desalination barge based in the Cape Town harbour is set to provide a further 50m litres a day.

However, in a newsletter to members, the Mouille Point Ratepayers’ Association has raised concerns over the placement of the plant at Granger Bay, saying the bulk of the infrastructure is close to residences.

The association says it is in the process of “trying to engage with [councillors] about the possibility of relocating this plant to another area where it is not adjacent to residential blocks of flats and homes”.

“We understand that desalination plants can be noisy, due to pumps and generators, and to have this one in such close proximity to a residential area is far from ideal. While we totally understand the water crisis, we believe that further investigation needs to be done to identify an alternative site.”

In a letter to the City on behalf of some body corporates in Mouille Point, concerns are raised that the City has not adequately consulted residents. The letter also required the City to confirm if environmental authorisation had been sought.

The water intake area would be near the Oceana Power Boat Club, with pipes along Beach Road to carry the sea water to the plant. Outlet pipes for waste would be along the promenade to the sewerage plant. Desalinated water would be directed via pipes to the City’s water supply, confirms City spokesperson Priya Reddy.

“For the marine intake a number of options were identified either within or in the vicinity of Oceana Power Boat Club. Tenderers are encouraged to inspect the site and surrounding areas in order to ensure suitability of the proposed site. Tenderers are responsible for validating proposed routes,” she says.

The pump station is intended to be installed in the Oceana Yacht Club’s harbour and would consist of submersible pump sets installed on the still water side of the breakwater wall, Reddy says.

“The layout and configuration of the installation and equipment orientation shall consider required free passages and space for repairs and maintenance of the equipment, including the handling of the respective equipment. The installation shall provide for suitable anchors and mounting platforms to ensure that rough ocean conditions will not damage the equipment and to accommodate the variation in the tidal water levels.”

The plant will operate on sea water reverse osmosis and is expected to be in place for two years, says Reddy.

Any dust or excess noise from the site will be monitored and fines will be issued if there are any transgressions, Reddy adds.

“There may be initial construction noise, noise coming from vehicles, generators on site.”

Granger Bay is one of the first three sites to get a desalination plant, Reddy says.

“We have been careful to look at potential sites where multiple communities across Cape Town can help to share the load of this absolutely vital intervention. The Cape Town coast is rugged and the rough seas make the location of temporary desalination plants tricky,” she says.

“The sites have been chosen after much overall examination. The temporary desalination plants cannot be situated only in one area. The whole of Cape Town is affected by the drought crisis and thus, all of our communities are asked to accept their important role in helping the City to navigate this drought crisis.”

Reddy adds: “We will attempt to communicate with members of the public as much as possible during this time and we ask residents to stand with us and to be constructive partners. The establishment of these temporary plants is vital for our sustainability as a city and it must be done.”

As the council plans emergency measures to help with the drought, locals have raised objections to having a desalination plant on their doorstep.

The City of Cape Town is planning a temporary desalination plant in Granger Bay, along with ones at Koeberg, Silverstroom, Woodbridge Island, Hout Bay, Red Hill, Strandfontein, Monwabisi and Harmony Park, which will provide an estimated 50m litres water a day.

A desalination barge based in the Cape Town harbour is set to provide a further 50m litres a day.

However, in a newsletter to members, the Mouille Point Ratepayers’ Association has raised concerns over the placement of the plant at Granger Bay, saying the bulk of the infrastructure is close to residences.

The association says it is in the process of “trying to engage with [councillors] about the possibility of relocating this plant to another area where it is not adjacent to residential blocks of flats and homes”.

“We understand that desalination plants can be noisy, due to pumps and generators, and to have this one in such close proximity to a residential area is far from ideal. While we totally understand the water crisis, we believe that further investigation needs to be done to identify an alternative site.”

In a letter to the City on behalf of some body corporates in Mouille Point, concerns are raised that the City has not adequately consulted residents. The letter also required the City to confirm if environmental authorisation had been sought.

The water intake area would be near the Oceana Power Boat Club, confirms City spokesperson Priya Reddy. “For the marine intake a number of options were identified either within or in the vicinity of Oceana Power Boat Club. Tenderers are encouraged to inspect the site and surrounding areas in order to ensure suitability of the proposed site. Tenderers are responsible for validating proposed routes,” she says.

The pump station will consist of submersible pump sets installed on the still water side of the breakwater wall, Reddy says. “The installation shall provide for suitable anchors and mounting platforms to ensure that rough ocean conditions will not damage the equipment and to accommodate the variation in the tidal water levels.”

The plant will operate on sea water reverse osmosis and is expected to be in place for two years. Any dust or excess noise from the site will be monitored and fines will be issued if there are any transgressions, Reddy adds.

“There may be initial construction noise, noise coming from vehicles, generators on site.”

Granger Bay is one of the first three sites to get a desalination plant, Reddy says. “We have been careful to look at potential sites where multiple communities across Cape Town can help to share the load of this absolutely vital intervention. The Cape Town coast is rugged and the rough seas make the location of temporary desalination plants tricky. The sites have been chosen after much overall examination. The temporary desalination plants cannot be situated only in one area. The whole of Cape Town is affected by the drought crisis and thus, all of our communities are asked to accept their important role in helping the City to navigate this drought crisis.”

Reddy adds: “We will attempt to communicate with members of the public as much as possible during this time and we ask residents to stand with us and to be constructive partners. The establishment of these temporary plants is vital for our sustainability as a city and it must be done.”

As the council plans emergency measures to help with the drought, locals have raised objections to having a desalination plant on their doorstep.

The City of Cape Town is planning a temporary desalination plant in Granger Bay, along with ones at Koeberg, Silverstroom, Woodbridge Island, Hout Bay, Red Hill, Strandfontein, Monwabisi and Harmony Park, which will provide an estimated 50m litres water a day.

A desalination barge based in the Cape Town harbour is set to provide a further 50m litres a day.

However, in a newsletter to members, the Mouille Point Ratepayers’ Association has raised concerns over the placement of the plant at Granger Bay, saying the bulk of the infrastructure is close to residences.

The association says it is in the process of “trying to engage with [councillors] about the possibility of relocating this plant to another area where it is not adjacent to residential blocks of flats and homes”.

“We understand that desalination plants can be noisy, due to pumps and generators, and to have this one in such close proximity to a residential area is far from ideal. While we totally understand the water crisis, we believe that further investigation needs to be done to identify an alternative site.”

In a letter to the City on behalf of some body corporates in Mouille Point, concerns are raised that the City has not adequately consulted residents. The letter also required the City to confirm if environmental authorisation had been sought.

The water intake area would be near the Oceana Power Boat Club, with pipes along Beach Road to carry the sea water to the plant. Outlet pipes for waste would be along the promenade to the sewerage plant. Desalinated water would be directed via pipes to the City’s water supply, confirms City spokesperson Priya Reddy.

“For the marine intake a number of options were identified either within or in the vicinity of Oceana Power Boat Club. Tenderers are encouraged to inspect the site and surrounding areas in order to ensure suitability of the proposed site. Tenderers are responsible for validating proposed routes,” she says.

The pump station is intended to be installed in the Oceana Yacht Club’s harbour and would consist of submersible pump sets installed on the still water side of the breakwater wall, Reddy says.

“The layout and configuration of the installation and equipment orientation shall consider required free passages and space for repairs and maintenance of the equipment, including the handling of the respective equipment. The installation shall provide for suitable anchors and mounting platforms to ensure that rough ocean conditions will not damage the equipment and to accommodate the variation in the tidal water levels.”

The plant will operate on sea water reverse osmosis and is expected to be in place for two years, says Reddy.

Any dust or excess noise from the site will be monitored and fines will be issued if there are any transgressions, Reddy adds.

“There may be initial construction noise, noise coming from vehicles, generators on site.”

Granger Bay is one of the first three sites to get a desalination plant, Reddy says.

“We have been careful to look at potential sites where multiple communities across Cape Town can help to share the load of this absolutely vital intervention. The Cape Town coast is rugged and the rough seas make the location of temporary desalination plants tricky,” she says.

“The sites have been chosen after much overall examination. The temporary desalination plants cannot be situated only in one area. The whole of Cape Town is affected by the drought crisis and thus, all of our communities are asked to accept their important role in helping the City to navigate this drought crisis.”

Reddy adds: “We will attempt to communicate with members of the public as much as possible during this time and we ask residents to stand with us and to be constructive partners. The establishment of these temporary plants is vital for our sustainability as a city and it must be done.”

As the council plans emergency measures to help with the drought, locals have raised objections to having a desalination plant on their doorstep.

The City of Cape Town is planning a temporary desalination plant in Granger Bay, along with ones at Koeberg, Silverstroom, Woodbridge Island, Hout Bay, Red Hill, Strandfontein, Monwabisi and Harmony Park, which will provide an estimated 50m litres water a day.

A desalination barge based in the Cape Town harbour is set to provide a further 50m litres a day.

However, in a newsletter to members, the Mouille Point Ratepayers’ Association has raised concerns over the placement of the plant at Granger Bay, saying the bulk of the infrastructure is close to residences.

The association says it is in the process of “trying to engage with [councillors] about the possibility of relocating this plant to another area where it is not adjacent to residential blocks of flats and homes”.

“We understand that desalination plants can be noisy, due to pumps and generators, and to have this one in such close proximity to a residential area is far from ideal. While we totally understand the water crisis, we believe that further investigation needs to be done to identify an alternative site.”

In a letter to the City on behalf of some body corporates in Mouille Point, concerns are raised that the City has not adequately consulted residents. The letter also required the City to confirm if environmental authorisation had been sought.

The water intake area would be near the Oceana Power Boat Club, with pipes along Beach Road to carry the sea water to the plant. Outlet pipes for waste would be along the promenade to the sewerage plant. Desalinated water would be directed via pipes to the City’s water supply, confirms City spokesperson Priya Reddy.

“For the marine intake a number of options were identified either within or in the vicinity of Oceana Power Boat Club. Tenderers are encouraged to inspect the site and surrounding areas in order to ensure suitability of the proposed site. Tenderers are responsible for validating proposed routes,” she says.

The pump station is intended to be installed in the Oceana Yacht Club’s harbour and would consist of submersible pump sets installed on the still water side of the breakwater wall, Reddy says.

“The layout and configuration of the installation and equipment orientation shall consider required free passages and space for repairs and maintenance of the equipment, including the handling of the respective equipment. The installation shall provide for suitable anchors and mounting platforms to ensure that rough ocean conditions will not damage the equipment and to accommodate the variation in the tidal water levels.”

The plant will operate on sea water reverse osmosis and is expected to be in place for two years, says Reddy.

Any dust or excess noise from the site will be monitored and fines will be issued if there are any transgressions, Reddy adds.

“There may be initial construction noise, noise coming from vehicles, generators on site.”

Granger Bay is one of the first three sites to get a desalination plant, Reddy says.

“We have been careful to look at potential sites where multiple communities across Cape Town can help to share the load of this absolutely vital intervention. The Cape Town coast is rugged and the rough seas make the location of temporary desalination plants tricky,” she says.

“The sites have been chosen after much overall examination. The temporary desalination plants cannot be situated only in one area. The whole of Cape Town is affected by the drought crisis and thus, all of our communities are asked to accept their important role in helping the City to navigate this drought crisis.”

Reddy adds: “We will attempt to communicate with members of the public as much as possible during this time and we ask residents to stand with us and to be constructive partners. The establishment of these temporary plants is vital for our sustainability as a city and it must be done.”

As the council plans emergency measures to help with the drought, locals have raised objections to having a desalination plant on their doorstep.

The City of Cape Town is planning a temporary desalination plant in Granger Bay, along with ones at Koeberg, Silverstroom, Woodbridge Island, Hout Bay, Red Hill, Strandfontein, Monwabisi and Harmony Park, which will provide an estimated 50m litres water a day.

A desalination barge based in the Cape Town harbour is set to provide a further 50m litres a day.

However, in a newsletter to members, the Mouille Point Ratepayers’ Association has raised concerns over the placement of the plant at Granger Bay, saying the bulk of the infrastructure is close to residences.

The association says it is in the process of “trying to engage with [councillors] about the possibility of relocating this plant to another area where it is not adjacent to residential blocks of flats and homes”.

“We understand that desalination plants can be noisy, due to pumps and generators, and to have this one in such close proximity to a residential area is far from ideal. While we totally understand the water crisis, we believe that further investigation needs to be done to identify an alternative site.”

In a letter to the City on behalf of some body corporates in Mouille Point, concerns are raised that the City has not adequately consulted residents. The letter also required the City to confirm if environmental authorisation had been sought.

The water intake area would be near the Oceana Power Boat Club, with pipes along Beach Road to carry the sea water to the plant. Outlet pipes for waste would be along the promenade to the sewerage plant. Desalinated water would be directed via pipes to the City’s water supply, confirms City spokesperson Priya Reddy.

“For the marine intake a number of options were identified either within or in the vicinity of Oceana Power Boat Club. Tenderers are encouraged to inspect the site and surrounding areas in order to ensure suitability of the proposed site. Tenderers are responsible for validating proposed routes,” she says.

The pump station is intended to be installed in the Oceana Yacht Club’s harbour and would consist of submersible pump sets installed on the still water side of the breakwater wall, Reddy says.

“The layout and configuration of the installation and equipment orientation shall consider required free passages and space for repairs and maintenance of the equipment, including the handling of the respective equipment. The installation shall provide for suitable anchors and mounting platforms to ensure that rough ocean conditions will not damage the equipment and to accommodate the variation in the tidal water levels.”

The plant will operate on sea water reverse osmosis and is expected to be in place for two years, says Reddy.

Any dust or excess noise from the site will be monitored and fines will be issued if there are any transgressions, Reddy adds.

“There may be initial construction noise, noise coming from vehicles, generators on site.”

Granger Bay is one of the first three sites to get a desalination plant, Reddy says.

“We have been careful to look at potential sites where multiple communities across Cape Town can help to share the load of this absolutely vital intervention. The Cape Town coast is rugged and the rough seas make the location of temporary desalination plants tricky,” she says.

“The sites have been chosen after much overall examination. The temporary desalination plants cannot be situated only in one area. The whole of Cape Town is affected by the drought crisis and thus, all of our communities are asked to accept their important role in helping the City to navigate this drought crisis.”

Reddy adds: “We will attempt to communicate with members of the public as much as possible during this time and we ask residents to stand with us and to be constructive partners. The establishment of these temporary plants is vital for our sustainability as a city and it must be done.”

As the council plans emergency measures to help with the drought, locals have raised objections to having a desalination plant on their doorstep.

The City of Cape Town is planning a temporary desalination plant in Granger Bay, along with ones at Koeberg, Silverstroom, Woodbridge Island, Hout Bay, Red Hill, Strandfontein, Monwabisi and Harmony Park, which will provide an estimated 50m litres water a day.

A desalination barge based in the Cape Town harbour is set to provide a further 50m litres a day.

However, in a newsletter to members, the Mouille Point Ratepayers’ Association has raised concerns over the placement of the plant at Granger Bay, saying the bulk of the infrastructure is close to residences.

The association says it is in the process of “trying to engage with [councillors] about the possibility of relocating this plant to another area where it is not adjacent to residential blocks of flats and homes”.

“We understand that desalination plants can be noisy, due to pumps and generators, and to have this one in such close proximity to a residential area is far from ideal. While we totally understand the water crisis, we believe that further investigation needs to be done to identify an alternative site.”

In a letter to the City on behalf of some body corporates in Mouille Point, concerns are raised that the City has not adequately consulted residents. The letter also required the City to confirm if environmental authorisation had been sought.

The water intake area would be near the Oceana Power Boat Club, with pipes along Beach Road to carry the sea water to the plant. Outlet pipes for waste would be along the promenade to the sewerage plant. Desalinated water would be directed via pipes to the City’s water supply, confirms City spokesperson Priya Reddy.

“For the marine intake a number of options were identified either within or in the vicinity of Oceana Power Boat Club. Tenderers are encouraged to inspect the site and surrounding areas in order to ensure suitability of the proposed site. Tenderers are responsible for validating proposed routes,” she says.

The pump station is intended to be installed in the Oceana Yacht Club’s harbour and would consist of submersible pump sets installed on the still water side of the breakwater wall, Reddy says.

“The layout and configuration of the installation and equipment orientation shall consider required free passages and space for repairs and maintenance of the equipment, including the handling of the respective equipment. The installation shall provide for suitable anchors and mounting platforms to ensure that rough ocean conditions will not damage the equipment and to accommodate the variation in the tidal water levels.”

The plant will operate on sea water reverse osmosis and is expected to be in place for two years, says Reddy.

Any dust or excess noise from the site will be monitored and fines will be issued if there are any transgressions, Reddy adds.

“There may be initial construction noise, noise coming from vehicles, generators on site.”

Granger Bay is one of the first three sites to get a desalination plant, Reddy says.

“We have been careful to look at potential sites where multiple communities across Cape Town can help to share the load of this absolutely vital intervention. The Cape Town coast is rugged and the rough seas make the location of temporary desalination plants tricky. The sites have been chosen after much overall examination. The temporary desalination plants cannot be situated only in one area. The whole of Cape Town is affected by the drought crisis and thus, all of our communities are asked to accept their important role in helping the City to navigate this drought crisis.”

Reddy adds: “We will attempt to communicate with members of the public as much as possible during this time and we ask residents to stand with us and to be constructive partners. The establishment of these temporary plants is vital for our sustainability as a city and it must be done.”

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