Locals lead the new economy

2017-08-01 06:01

Young computer programmers are helping to develop answers to the water crisis, and create systems for families to better manage household tasks.

As part of a month-long programme focused on highlighting the region’s up-and-coming innovators, last week Alan Winde, provincial minister of economic opportunities, visited Absa Aliens, the bank’s software development and design office based in Gardens.

Young people from across the city are working on products at the development centre, and shared their experiences with Winde. Fifteen software developers are participating in the programme this year.

The centre specialises in native mobile development and is at the forefront of the Microsoft Xamarin technology, which allows programmers to share code across platforms, rather than having to recreate the code for different platforms such as iOS, Android and Windows. The team also specialises in the internet of things, where devices around the home or office collect information from the environment that is sent to a central place such as the cloud. Game development for virtual reality technologies is another focus ­area.

Keanu Arendze, one of the software developers, said during his experience at Absa Aliens he had learnt a range of different programming languages. Arendze is part of a team that is developing a water-monitoring sensor system for Absa’s own premises. The device will calculate the volume of water used in the office.

Amina Latief, another developer, had worked on the Mega U application, which was made available to the public a few weeks ago. The app allows parents to set tasks for children who are given “pocket money” when they complete the tasks. Latief said she had received valuable experience at Absa Aliens, and hoped to grow her career as a software developer.

Winde said the young programmers had an important role to play in ensuring South Africa, and Africa, led the way in the new digital economy.

“We need to own our space in the new economy. The fourth industrial revolution is going to make a massive difference to how the world works, and we can’t simply be consumers of products and systems created elsewhere. Here at the southern tip of Africa, we must be creating products we can sell to the world,” said Winde.

The visit was the final part of Winde’s programme in July, which focused on highlighting how residents are using innovation and technology to improve lives.

Young computer programmers are helping to develop answers to the water crisis, and create systems for families to better manage household tasks.

As part of a month-long programme focused on highlighting the region’s up-and-coming innovators, last week Alan Winde, provincial minister of economic opportunities, visited Absa Aliens, the bank’s software development and design office based in ­Gardens.

Young people from across the city are working on products at the development centre, and shared their experiences with Winde.

Fifteen software developers are participating in the programme this year.

The centre specialises in native mobile development and is at the forefront of the Microsoft Xamarin technology, which allows programmers to share code across platforms, rather than having to recreate the code for different platforms such as iOS, Android and Windows.

The team also specialises in the internet of things, where devices around the home or office collect information from the environment that is sent to a central place such as the cloud.

Game development for virtual reality technologies is another focus ­area.

Keanu Arendze, one of the software developers, said during his experience at Absa Aliens he had learnt a range of different programming languages. Arendze is part of a team that is developing a water-monitoring sensor system for Absa’s own premises. The device will calculate the volume of water used in the office.

Amina Latief, another developer, had worked on the Mega U application, which was made available to the public a few weeks ago.

The app allows parents to set tasks for children who are given “pocket money” when they complete the tasks.

Latief said she had received valuable experience at Absa Aliens, and hoped to grow her career as a software developer.

Winde said the young programmers had an important role to play in ensuring South Africa, and Africa, led the way in the new digital economy.

“We need to own our space in the new economy. The fourth industrial revolution is going to make a massive difference to how the world works, and we can’t simply be consumers of products and systems created elsewhere.

“Here at the southern tip of Africa, we must be creating products we can sell to the world,” said Winde.

The visit was the final part of Winde’s programme in July, which focused on highlighting how residents are using innovation and technology to improve lives.

Young computer programmers are helping to develop answers to the water crisis, and create systems for families to better manage household tasks.

As part of a month-long programme focused on highlighting the region’s up-and-coming innovators, last week Alan Winde, provincial minister of economic opportunities, visited Absa Aliens, the bank’s software development and design office based in Gardens. Young people from across the city are working on products at the development centre, and shared their experiences with Winde. Fifteen software developers are participating in the programme this year.

The centre specialises in native mobile development and is at the forefront of the Microsoft Xamarin technology, which allows programmers to share code across platforms, rather than having to recreate the code for different platforms such as iOS, Android and Windows. The team also specialises in the internet of things, where devices around the home or office collect information from the environment that is sent to a central place such as the cloud. Game development for virtual reality technologies is another focus ­area.

Keanu Arendze, one of the software developers, said during his experience at Absa Aliens he had learnt a range of different programming languages. Arendze is part of a team that is developing a water-monitoring sensor system for Absa’s own premises. The device will calculate the volume of water used in the office.

Amina Latief, another developer, had worked on the Mega U application, which was made available to the public a few weeks ago. The app allows parents to set tasks for children who are given “pocket money” when they complete the tasks. Latief said she had received valuable experience at Absa Aliens, and hoped to grow her career as a software developer.

Young computer programmers are helping to develop answers to the water crisis, and create systems for families to better manage household tasks.

As part of a month-long programme focused on highlighting the region’s up-and-coming innovators, last week Alan Winde, provincial minister of economic opportunities, visited Absa Aliens, the bank’s software development and design office based in Gardens. Young people from across the city are working on products at the development centre, and shared their experiences with Winde. Fifteen software developers are participating in the programme this year.

The centre is at the forefront of the Microsoft Xamarin technology, which allows programmers to share code across platforms, rather than having to recreate the code for different platforms such as iOS, Android and Windows. The team also specialises in the internet of things, where devices around the home or office collect information from the environment that is sent to a central place such as the cloud. Game development for virtual reality technologies is another focus ­area.

Keanu Arendze, one of the software developers, said during his experience at Absa Aliens he had learnt a range of different programming languages. Arendze is part of a team that is developing a water-monitoring sensor system for Absa’s own premises. The device will calculate the volume of water used in the office.

Winde said the programmers had an important role to play in ensuring South Africa led the way in the new digital economy.

Young computer programmers are helping to develop answers to the water crisis, and create systems for families to better manage household tasks.

Last week Alan Winde, provincial minister of economic opportunities, visited Absa Aliens, the bank’s software development and design office based in Gardens.

Fifteen software developers are participating in the programme this year.

Keanu Arendze, one of the software developers, said during his experience at Absa Aliens he had learnt a range of different programming languages. Arendze is part of a team that is developing a water-monitoring sensor system for Absa’s own premises. The device will calculate the volume of water used in the office.

Amina Latief, another developer, had worked on the Mega U application, which allows parents to set tasks for children who are given “pocket money” when they complete the tasks.

Winde said the young programmers had an important role to play in ensuring South Africa led the way in the new digital economy.

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