News24

30 000 would-be UJ students cause chaos

2011-01-10 19:45

Johannesburg - About 30 000 late applicants at the University of Johannesburg (UJ), mostly on its Kingsway campus, caused heavy traffic jams on Monday, Johannesburg metro police said.

"The applicants were parking on Kingsway Road and this made traffic very heavy... it was severely congested," said Chief Superintendent Wayne Minnaar.

He said traffic was affected from midday until about 17:00.

UJ's registrar, Professor Marie Muller, said the flood in late applications could be attributed to the increase in the "number of National Senior Certificate holders in Gauteng that obtained University admission in the 2010 exams", compared to last year.

The university received 63 400 applications for 2011 first year undergraduate studies in the dedicated application period in 2010.

"The university's pre-selection is based on Grade 11 results and UJ conditionally admitted 17 500 applicants."

University spokesperson Herman Esterhuizen said some of these accepted applicants may have applied to other universities and so would not actually enrol at UJ, in which case there would be some available spaces for late applicants.

"Every late applicant that arrived today (Monday) was given an application form... but some were still upset because they thought that they could arrive at the university and register. It just doesn't work like that.

"Some applicants were quite upset and had to be escorted off the campus."

Muller said UJ may enrol 48 000 students in 2011 and this included all undergraduate and postgraduate students.

She also reminded applicants that "compliance with the minimum admission requirements does not guarantee a study place at UJ".

Comments
  • daspoort - 2011-01-10 19:56

    Thank you education department for adjusting the matric results and screwing up the future of this country. At least I got my matric back in the 90's, when there was such a thing as standards. To pass matric now you need 4 subjects @ 30% and 3 @ 40%. WTF??? What are you doing Angie, going for the quick fix. You dont fix problems with problems. And remember, I'm watching you!

  • Aj - 2011-01-10 20:04

    it doesn't matter. As long as the universities keep their standards high.

      Lctr - 2011-01-10 20:45

      Unfortunately, this may not be the case. I cannot generalize to every university, but there are tertiary institutions that have been given the 'directive' from the the DoHE that an 'acceptable' pass-rate for any undergraduate module is 80%. When pass-rates fall below this, you can bet that management cracks down on departments and staff.

  • siyafrica - 2011-01-10 20:15

    That's the fundamental problem with education in South Africa: the government sees it fit to devalue the matric pass mark thus increasing the number of matric passers with useless qualifications. By the time they get into tertiary institutions they are trying to play catch up with other students with better qualifications if not failing out right by the middle of their first year or second year. Education inflation. The better thing to do is to introduce vocational subjects in highschool so that they have more options upon graduating than just flooding tertiary institutions and getting their parents to take out outrageous loans to pay for something that might not pan out.

  • lldoidge - 2011-01-10 20:18

    The government have now promised FREE fees so just wait for the riots to start.

  • Janine - 2011-01-10 20:22

    I did my matric back in the 70s - needed to pass 6 subjects with 50% in order to get into university.

      Jixby - 2011-01-11 12:03

      Yip, those were the days! Then education actually added value.

  • Joe_Public - 2011-01-10 20:37

    So will this be blamed on the legacy of apartheid? Given that it's now 16 years and 8 stadiums into the ANC reign. Or will our government have us believe that our universities and prisons should have justifiably taken a lower priority than the soccer world cup. And yet our masses still vote for this liberation party that has liberated and is now obsolete.

  • AquaticApe - 2011-01-10 20:46

    Keeping the masses ignorant is old ANC policy. Remember one of the first things they did after 1994 was to 'retire' all the teachers by offering generous payouts and to close the teacher training colleges. A quality education is not part of their strategy to maintain a hold over the minds of the hoi-polloi. Ignorant people believe anything their leaders say, not having the knowledge or skills to discern reality. Inflating the pass rate fools their followers into accepting a fourth-rate education. Let's hope that the Universities do maintain international best practice norms and standards, but I have my doubts.

  • Dundermoose - 2011-01-10 20:51

    My wfe got a 87% average in matric in '99. That's must be equivalent to 125% now!!

      Peter - 2011-01-11 08:37

      What did you get for English?

  • Dundermoose - 2011-01-10 20:52

    My wife got an 87% average for matric back in '99. That's got to be equivalent to 125% now!!

      Bosj - 2011-01-11 09:05

      Congratulations on your wife, but please answer the question.

      mageu77 - 2011-01-11 09:46

      answer the question

      Jixby - 2011-01-11 12:05

      Answer the DAMN question! :)

  • dcdiscountclothing - 2011-01-10 21:23

    in my first year at unisa, there were over 250 student, i am now in my last semester there are only 12 left (asper the lecturer.Apparently that is the norm with Unisa while i dnt have statistics of other universities, it gives us the picture.The problem is that in africa people are made to beleive education is the only way out.Imagine how many entrepreneurs who stand on admission que and drop out of uni with low self esteem

      Limpopoist - 2011-01-11 10:22

      It happen to universities in South africa.Univesity of venda in Year 2000 admission over 6000 new student (fresh from hight school)But after 3 year degree Only less than 400 graduated,what happen to the rest drop out (or discontinued ).All these 400 graduate is considered big achievment...

  • Janis - 2011-01-10 21:46

    what do you expect? Useless matric exemption passes and mega expectations with a 30% pass? Wake up SA! Stop dreaming and get real! Nobody is owed university degrees unless they can write a sentence and work out a sum. I blame those liars, Umalusi, for pretending that we all are brilliant. We aren't, actually. And no amount of social engineering will make it so. Some are able, the most are workers!! It is impossible for all to get a university degree and then what? What a lie!

      Ross - 2011-01-11 07:09

      Sixty percent of "university students" should not be at university but rather be doing more work orientated practical courses. The current perception today is that, for example, a BA degree in flower arrangement is worth more than a qualified hydraulics technician.

  • Sash - 2011-01-11 07:52

    Unfortunately for these students whose marks were adjusted and truly dont meet the standard for a degree qualification are in for a big suprise - UJ will most likely asses their grade 11 results,.which clearly didnt make the cut together with the grade 12 results along with a National Benchmark Test - it wont be hard for UJ to workout whose marks were adjusted!

      kanjyditglo - 2011-01-11 08:12

      Strange how so many black matriculants passed with an "A" for Life Orientation ( but in no other subjects achieved such high symbols- because only LO is assessed internally?) . Several of the LO projects to be done was on 1. career/study choices & 2. application process for tersiary studies (had to include a physical example of an application). If they really delivered "A" level work, they all would have known that Gr11 marks + National Benchmark Test results (written throughout 2010) are the important results for applying to university...just confirms the "We demand" attitude ( without any effort from their side). ai tog.

  • lgmatizi - 2011-01-11 09:27

    Where are the vocational colleges - especially agriculture, if some day we need energetic young farmers? When is South Africa going to learn from Zimbabwe, where each sector of the economy is supported by vocational or tertiary education? I feel wounded in my heart to see hungry kids queuing for a degree place like this when other avenues can be created for them. I hope authorities need to re-look at this as A MATTER OF URGENCY. I went through the technical route myself but today I am studying for a PhD.

  • NL - 2011-01-11 10:03

    It is really sad to see how the government misleads these kids into thinking that they have passed. So many of them should have been held back - but were told they qualify for Nationanl Diplomas! The kids are still excited, but soon reality will hit and they will realise that even though their Matric certificate says they qualify, no tertiary institution will accept them. And if they do happen to be accepted, there is no way they will cope or pass thier studies. The reality is that if you get 20s and 30s and that makes you fit for varsity, no miracle will help you achieve the required 50% pass rate at varsity. So these poor kids are doomed....

  • NL - 2011-01-11 10:04

    It is really sad to see how the government misleads these kids into thinking that they have passed. So many of them should have been held back - but were told they qualify for Nationanl Diplomas! The kids are still excited, but soon reality will hit and they will realise that even though their Matric certificate says they qualify, no tertiary institution will accept them. And if they do happen to be accepted, there is no way they will cope or pass thier studies. The reality is that if you get 20s and 30s and that makes you fit for varsity, no miracle will help you achieve the required 50% pass rate at varsity. So these poor kids are doomed....

  • Nas - 2011-01-11 10:56

    I saw this problem back when i was in college. The students get lazier and lazier every year. They moan the work is too much and land up missing deadlines for projects. The lecturers try and help them by extending deadlines and they STILL miss the due date. At this point they get a blasting from the parents and superiors because half the class is failing. The problem is that nobody blames the students for their poor performances, it's shocking! I used to get irate when i handed a project in on time only to find out the date was extended. It's time the Education department took a stand and shut out the rubbish. If you work hard there is NO excuse to at least pass. 40%!? Paleeease! That's so easy to do, i just cant accept that students struggle to do this( oh no wait, its now 30% to pass some subjects).

  • Jixby - 2011-01-11 12:00

    "compliance with the minimum admission requirements does not guarantee a study place at UJ". Now this remark by UJ says it all, doesn't it?

  • birdman - 2011-01-11 15:42

    The Bottom Line to this whole saga is:- DISCIPLINE!!! There is no more discipline in schools. The kids do exactly what they like and the teachers have no control. When we went to school we were caned for misbehavior and the girls got serious "lines" to write out. Teachers were respected and the Principal was "The Boss"! To achieve an A stream matric with exemption was difficult and you had to focus. Play sport and also had to do chores at home. Parents used to be feared as well. The new thinking of no corporal punishment is my generations' fault! It seems that collectively we've given our children far too much "rope" (because we were chastised) and this is now a problem. Pupils (learners) now think that they can get a matric for free! When discipline is finally brought back into the education system, and children are given a good hiding for being disobedient, surly and rude, this will be the day that learning will be restored and marks achieved for good work have worth. Going to University will then mean something. Having rampaging hoardes braking up tertiary education establishments because they can't get their own way must also be dealt with with ZERO tolerance!

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