News24

860 killed on SA roads already this month

2010-12-22 20:45

Johannesburg - A total of 860 people have died from road accidents during the past three weeks, the Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC) said on Wednesday.

"As from the beginning of December 2010 until 21 December 2010, the fatalities are at 860 people from 717 crashes," said RTMC spokesperson Ashref Ismail in a statement.

"(This is) as compared to last year's 984 fatalities from 768 fatal crashes."

Ismail said this year there had been nine major fatal accidents with 59 deaths.

Since December 1 to this Tuesday, some 1,1 million vehicles and drivers had been checked and a total of 1 500 drunk drivers arrested.

"Road traffic volumes are bound to swell on all major routes leading to the coast on the N1 South and N3 as well as to the North (N1 to Polokwane and Zimbabwe) and the N4 East to Mozambique," he warned.
 

Comments
  • iandicey - 2010-12-22 21:20

    "if you speed , you are a killer" is a disgrace and requires legal questioning - if you have a gun or of you have a knife you are more likely to be guilty of being a killer.have travelled to cape town and back to knysna in the last 24 hrs - today weather shit, rain big time at Swellendam,thick fog from Mossel Bay to Knysna no accidents, drivers courteous,only problem one dark coloured taxi mossel bay to Albertinia 17h45 no lights when every other car on N2 had lights on> in 24 hrs not one traffic cop seen on road> where are the ROADBLOCKS? where are they?

      Jason - 2010-12-23 07:42

      The speed cops are sitting in the 60km/h zones and are dishing out fines for driving at 71km/h.

      emmamimie - 2010-12-23 12:06

      iandicey you are quite right, I have question those bill boards with the Drive alive people they are disgusting, when the majority of our people are killed in Taxi and pickup related accidents. Drink driving, and cellphone talking are easy targets, the police do not get down to the gritty lot that are causing these accidents.

      GavKZN - 2010-12-23 13:30

      All the cops are here in KZN...with so many people coming from inland to Durbs I've noticed quite a few more roadblocks in the evenings in KZN and a LOT more speed traps...maybe KZN could lose some camera's and lend some cops to other provinces!...I agree with you about speed...it's not always the speed that's going to change the outcome of an accident but rather the driving style. Earlier today I witnessed fine work by the KZN metro cops...BMW 5 series moved from the fast lane and decided that the breakdown lane would be a great place to overtake the traffic....too bad there was a patrolling officer sitting in the breakdown watching traffic...as the BMW driver had to slam on breaks to avoid killing the cop, the cop was waiting with the ticket book!

  • Macho Mike - 2010-12-22 21:32

    Absolutely shocking statistic, but not a surprising one. The death toll will crash through the 1000th figure by the end of Decenber. So much for traffic cops getting tough with drivers. SA needs a radical change in road safety. The European system of points on licences would be a good start.Then have a roadworthy system to check and ensure all those imoto's and jammie's are legal, have proper tyres and breaks etc. The tackle illegal licence's, cop bribery, drunken drivers etc etc. Chances are none of the above will happen, which means the manufacturers of body bags will continue to thrive.

      Coop - 2010-12-23 09:57

      We already have the points system and there are plans afoot to require regular roadworthy tests too...

      emmamimie - 2010-12-23 12:08

      Macho Mike all they have to bring in is the "Warrant of Fitness" before you can licence you vehicle, but then we have to have integrity where workers are concerned, because in this country money talks.

  • Brieuse - 2010-12-22 21:57

    Most of the accident reports I've seen have been taxis and trucks. The only exception I can think of right now would be Kallis driving into a gate. Maybe only enforcing speed limits is not the solution?

  • Realist - 2010-12-22 22:06

    SPEED DOES NOT KILL!!!. Your chance of surviving a head on collision at 120 km/h is about the same as at 160 km/h. WHAT KILLS? Well overtaking on blind rises, crossing barrier lines, overtaking in the face of oncoming traffic, reckless driving, etc. These are the causes of death on the road. Why cannot traffic officials understand this basic logic. If I travel at 160 km/h how can I kill anybody, however, if I overtake in the face of oncoming traffic at even 80km/h somebody is bound to die if it results in a head on collision. While I am not saying I approve of speeding, I believe that the concentration of traffic officers should move away from the money generating speed traps and concentration be given to the real issues that cause death on the roads - like the overtaking on blind rises, jumping red lights, etc.

      Zennie - 2010-12-22 22:31

      SPEED BY ITSELF IS NOT THE KILLER,BUT WHERE SPEED IS ADDED TO A ACCIDENT,FATALIITIES ARE HIGHER AND WORST.WHEN SOMETHING MECHANICALLY GOES WRONG,THE REACTION TIME IS SMALLER WHEN SPEEDING. BIG DIFFERCE IN GOING 110 AND 160Kph.BIG BIG. I KNOW WHAT I'M TALKING ABOUT.(TRAFFIC ENGINEERING,ROAD OBSEVATIONS.MEDICAL VIEW AND POST MORTEMS)

      Realist - 2010-12-22 23:28

      Zennie, I have to disagree. Simulate a head on collision at 110km/h and another at 160 km/h. The chances of getting out of either alive is slim. If you reduce it down to abut 60km/h then possibly yes, but bear in mind that the legal spped on our national roads varies between 100 and 120 km/h. At these speeds and above, you do not stand much chance of surviving a head on collision. Yes, your time to react is less at higher speeds, BUT my point is that most fatalities are caused by HEAD ON collisions - Speed does not play a part in people stupidly being on the wrong side of the road in the way of an oncoming car. HENCE SPEED DOES NOT KILL

      PDP - 2010-12-23 08:09

      Couldn't agree more. It is just to easy for authorities to highlight drunken driving & speeding. By doing that it "seems" as if they are on top of things. They conveniently don't put any emphasis on all the other issues we face on the roads daily.

      Brieuse - 2010-12-23 09:02

      @Zennie You are correct in reaction times and all. But tell me which is worse, a car such as a BMW designed to travel at 200km/h or more travelling at 160km/h on the highway, or a taxi with bald tyres and no brakes with 16 clients driving at 100km/h on the same road? The answer in my opinion is both are equally bad as even though the BMW is perfectly safe travelling at 160km/h, it has to drive past that taxi.

      warickw - 2010-12-23 09:44

      I think another major reason for the high accident rate is that most drives are not capable of driving on a highway. I think we have to re-evaluate our drivers license test, when was the last time you heard anyone dieing from parallel parking or alley docking. Drivers license test should focus on highway driving and road etiquette, i think this will help make our roads safer.

      IceBlaster - 2010-12-23 12:59

      I agree with Warickw, look at germany for instance, its road death toll is far lower than south africas even though they have 12500kms of autoban of which 70% has no speed limit and a lot more cars than SA. Reason in my opinion is there drive ablity considering it that about 2 years to get your licence and it is expensive to get it since you have to go throught a driving school which teaches your high speed car control.

      Zennie - 2010-12-23 23:12

      Realist your right,I misunderstood your comment-120/160hm/h. But still,speeding plays a big role in all that you said...overtaking,barrierlines,reckless/drunken driving.(Not the cause but severely more serious where speeding is added.) Brieuse, I agree a BMW will be more safe at higher speed,but there cant be a limit for Bmw and for junkcars.Travelling at a safe speed the BMW's drver stand a better chance to avoid a collision with the taxi.I've been drving emergency vehicles for many years and believe me I had many miss-experienced collisions caused by stupid mistakes,bad driving skills and junkcars on the road.A woman was killed last week on the N2 when another woman made a u-turn on the freeway.This wont easily happen on the highways in the UK or US.(Strickter lawenforcement?) Safe drving and a merry christmas to you all.Sure we feel the same on deaths on our roads.

  • kerrvsteve - 2010-12-22 23:10

    Having driven for many years and all over the world the one thing that stands out about African roads in general is the variation in speed you come across. In my view, that is one of the biggest contributors to accidents on the open road. When the majority of vehicles are moving at 120kmh and someone is beetling along at 80 or 60, collisions are virtually inevitable. Moreso when they are stopped in the road. By contrast, if you drive on a freeway or rural road in UK or Australia, it can feel a bit like a conveyor belt with just about everyone doing exactly the limit. Why not introduce minimum speed limits and fine people for being too slow. As in nature, if you don't keep up with the herd, you get eaten.

      Coop - 2010-12-23 10:00

      Many roads DO have minimum speed limits, on our freeways it is 60km/h. Sadly it is not enforced.

  • Cybermatix - 2010-12-22 23:25

    Every year about this time (Christmas) the debate starts again on the "carnage" on our roads. The same discussion takes place over Easter weekends. It is blamed on drunk driving, more vehicles on the road, speed, and a number of other factors, that only really occurs over these two periods. The impression I have been getting (and of course I may be totally wrong) is that the rest of the year there is NOT a carnage on our roads, because none of the media, TV, print or Internet, and institutions like Arrive Alive and others really make any great fuss and public comment on this subject. OK so let's look at the statistics. I understand (without really researching it well) is that of annual SA road deaths is about 11,000 per year. This is roughly about 916 per month or about 30 per day. Over the festive periods (Christmas and Easter) the average per month rises to about 1000 per month or about 33 deaths per day. This means over the festive season the death rate rises by roughly 10% over and above the "normal" period. So I must conclude that a rise of 10% in road deaths turns the situation from "normal" to a "carnage". Isn't is closer to the truth that SA has a "carnage" on the roads every day, and the average goes up slightly over the festive periods primarily because there there more cars on the road, and there are more parties. Am I missing something here, or is there something seriously wrong with the road safety system in SA in general, and not only over the festive seasons.

      PDP - 2010-12-23 08:11

      You hit the nail on the head!

      sweetsmile4ever@24.com - 2010-12-23 08:12

      I totaly agree with Cybermatix - but can't help to wonder - if you take into account the amount of cars on the road during these festive periods, lets say, increased by 20%. Then altough it looks like the accidents increased - if you look at the increased volume then will the accident/car ratio not actually be less? So, yes I agree - traffic officers should consentrate more on recless driving all through the year and not just speed traps - this is an everyday problem.

  • honey_badger - 2010-12-23 05:14

    I agree with Cybermatix. The amount of traffic on a normal work day during he rest of the year is even more hectic than holiday makers on their way to their destinations. The only difference is that the holiday accidents gruesome toll make headlines. What I would like to know what are the stats for a two month period country wide - say during February up until the beginning af the Easter holidays. I bet they are shocking.

  • jaycee - 2010-12-23 08:01

    Yesterday I was the impression that there were more fatalities this year compared with the same time last year. Ok, I was wrong, but considering how little the lower figure is and the actions taken by road authorities, it is still VERY alarming. Something somewhere is wrong with our traffic situation and it seems the authorities are not addressing the real issues.

  • Jim - 2010-12-23 08:02

    Every year we read the same thing. What has been done? NOTHING. Our clever transport minister needs education thats the problem. Start an effective rail system and get the large trucks off the road. Sort out the lawlessness of the Taxi's, and their unroady vehicles. Make sure your corruption is dealt with and people earn their drivers licenses. Try that for a start instead of talking crap every year in the news.

  • RedCherry - 2010-12-23 08:24

    The UK is approx. one fifth of the size of ZA, with approx. 20 million more people with, by extension, many more cars in less space. In ZA, however, road deaths are 40% higher than in the UK. Why? Well; in the UK, there are roadworthiness tests annually on every car older than 3 years - if the car fails, it's off the road until its fixed. If it cannot be fixed, it is scrapped. Furthermore, you cannot get a car without a licence and insurance; drunk driving leads to loss of licence; driving without a licence can lead to enormous fines etc., you cannot get a licence unless you can actually drive (as opposed to buying one). If you want something badly enough, you have to do something to achieve it. It's no good expecting people to be responsible - they aren't and never will be. You have to have a big enough stick to beat them with that they don't break the law. Introduce similar laws here and you will see change - eventually - once we have worked through all the permutations for corrupting the system, of course. The mindset needs to change, however, like complaining about slogans. "If you speed, you are potentially a killer" doesn't have the same ring, does it? The point is, as usual, missed. Speed kills, because there are too many unlicensed arseholes driving unroadworthy cars too fast while under the influence of drink, with the full knowledge that there will be little or no consequence to them. Why not worry about that instead of the words of a campaign?

  • sipho - 2010-12-23 08:37

    Speed is the ONLY PROBLEM on the roads. Speed, and only speed, kills! It doesn't take a rocket scientist to see that all the illegal overtaking, idiotic driving, etc, is impatience related to people trying to speed. Massive speed differentials occur when some people speed. An accident at 120kms/hr is going to kill, accidents simply don't occur at 60km/hr because you can stop in time. They must simply insist everyone goes not 1km/hr above the speed limit. There must be massive fines, but not by camera. These speedsters must be stopped and removed from the roads. People who speed and crash must be had up for murder if anyone dies or is injured.

      emmamimie - 2010-12-23 12:38

      Sipho I live in a suburban area in CT most speed limits are 60kph. We have plenty of accidents on these road with fatalities. Most SouthAfrican do not know how to use the national roads, they are continuously hugging the centre line when driving and then overtakein the face of on coming traffic, we do not have civility on our road at all.When I learnt to drive i was told "stay as far left of the middle of the road as possible" you "indicate to overtake" not "indicate and overtake" I watch a lot of our driving schools teaching people to drive and most of the time its in the right hand lane, why? Many of our drivers would never survive anywhere on the road in Europe there they are worse then our taxi's but sooooo courtious and soooo civil on the road.

      IceBlaster - 2010-12-23 13:15

      SPEED has never killed anyone EVER. The land speed record is +-1200km/h and the person that did i didn't die. BAD DRIVERS KILL. And BTW most studies done have show that majority of accidents happen at speeds UNDER 60 km/h. And lastly theres a reason why they only start trapping at Speedlimit+10km/h that is due to speedo error, since it is almost imposible to get your speedo to read true speed all the time.

      sipho - 2010-12-23 14:10

      Difficult to argue with irrationality. Of course the person who holds the land speed record didn't die, but lots who tried to break that record did. The other statements are equally illogical...better go and study physics especially the part about velocity, energy, mas, momentum, stopping distances (friction), etc.

      dan.j.bm - 2010-12-23 16:01

      how about you study/read up about calibration sipho?

  • symbiosis1981 - 2010-12-23 08:59

    The sad thing here is that we accuse government for not doing enough, what about us drivers? last night i saw a man with his child on the drivers sit while he was driving, i dont know how many time we are told not to do that but we still ignore them. maybe they should use shock advertising so we can see axactly what happens when we think traffic laws are for loosers, I nearly died in a traffic accident last year, in my car if you wont fastern your seatbelt we are not going anywhere period. Its my life not the ministers that im worried about.

  • SAConcerned - 2010-12-23 09:27

    Traffic is a major issue on our roads in South Africa. Unworthy vehicles, irresponsible drivers, speed and drunk drivers. I lived a number of years in the Netherlands and was impressed by their implementation of the traffic service. I was wondering why the South African government does not look into the following solution for South African roads to make the place better for all road users. To counter speeding on the highways of the major cities in South Africa, why not do as in the Netherlands and install permanent traffic camera boxes every 1,5 kms. Not all the camera boxes in Holland had cameras installed as it would be too expensive to have cameras on the highways every 1,5kms. Instead these would be routinely rotated. This means that people driving on the road did not know at each and every camera whether there was a camera or not. This resulted in drivers keeping to the speed limit as they were afraid of getting a fine in the post. By installing permanent cameras in plain view for all to see, it resulted in no traffic officials having to hide next to the roads of major highways and try catch speedsters. A team of officers was only required to rotate the cameras on a weekly basis. Traffic officials that do want to hide next to the roads and catch speedsters, could then do this on other roads in the cities and not on the highways. In regards to road worthy vehicles, in the Netherlands vehicles had to be licensed and roadworthy every year. This was done once a year upon expiry of the vehicles license by sending the vehicle to a recognized service center registered with the traffic department. So when your vehicle is serviced, the company servicing your vehicle would issue a roadworthy certificate and new license. No more standing in line for a new vehicle license. All registered vehicle servicing companies are then required by law to adhere to the roadworthy laws. If a vehicle is not roadworthy, the company servicing the vehicle is not allowed to release the vehicle to the owner until the owner makes the vehicle roadworthy. If the vehicle owner does not want it to be roadworthy or cannot, then the service garage confiscates the vehicle and arranges for it to be scrapped. To counter any service garages found to illegally roadworthy vehicles, they end up losing their license permanently and hence go out of business. Regarding speed and irresponsible drivers, in the Netherlands there are undercover police vehicles without visible police lights or markings. These vehicles are fitted with cameras front and back and a recording device. The undercover traffic officials patrol the roads and when they recognize an road user disobeying the rules of the road, they capture video footage of the person disobeying the rules of the road. Once done, they then activate a sign that pops up either in the front of their vehicle on the dashboard or in the back of their vehicle staring "police - follow me" and flashing police lights fitted to the interior of the unmarked police vehicle. The culprit found disobeying the rules of the road is then required to follow the unmarked police car to a public area like a petrol station or a mall or a police station and there the undercover police then inform the person disobeying the rules of the road of his offence. If the person does not believe the police, he has the opportunity of seeing the captured footage on a TV monitor inside the police vehicle. The culprit is then issued a fine on the spot or depending on the severity of the offence sometimes arrested and taken into custody. To make this type of "undercover traffic management" even more effective, there is a program on TV in the Netherlands where a team of camera men follow the undercover traffic offices and capture footage of the work the undercover traffic officers do and show it on TV in a program called "weg misbruikers" meaning "Road abusers". This then helps in making the public aware of the types of idiots on the roads in the Netherlands and the problems they cause. In the program the reason why a particular person is stopped is explain and what the correct rule of the road is. This program is very entertaining at times. To top it all, as currently implemented in South Africa, they also have a points system. Whereby road users loose points for illegal traffic offences. Well done here!! The point system is also highlighted in this TV program. Then, with all the automated systems set up by the traffic department to catch speeding drivers with the camera system, to catch road abusers with the undercover traffic vehicles, its then left up to the rest of the traffic depart meant to set up roadblocks at the petrol stations along the main highways (especially late at night)whereby they divert the traffic through the petrol station and stop persons to check drivers licenses and do a quick alcohol test and remove drivers not adhering to the alcohol level as required by law. In most cases there is a line drawn between drunk driver (far over the level) and drivers who are just over the legal limit. In the case of a driver just over the legal level, they give a warning, register it in a data base and request the driver to either have his passenger if he/she is sober to drive them home or phone someone to come collect them or in some cases, leave the vehicle there at the petrol station next to the highway and then taxis (arranged by the traffic department) takes the person home at their own expense...or if the person over the limit does not or cannot adhere to the prior mentioned, then they are taken into custody and requested to sleep the night in jail until sober. Please note, these persons are not arrested. However persons well over the limit or whom come up on the database as having been warned previously are arrested on the spot and taken to jail. I hope this information finds the correct person in government as I think this is definitely something we could invest in for the future of South Africa and our road users.

      Zennie - 2010-12-23 23:19

      I believe the majority in the Nederlands respect and give their support to the traffic authorities and work together towards roadsafety.

  • SAConcerned - 2010-12-23 09:28

    Traffic is a major issue on our roads in South Africa. Unworthy vehicles, irresponsible drivers, speed and drunk drivers. I lived a number of years in the Netherlands and was impressed by their implementation of the traffic service. I was wondering why the South African government does not look into the following solution for South African roads to make the place better for all road users. To counter speeding on the highways of the major cities in South Africa, why not do as in the Netherlands and install permanent traffic camera boxes every 1,5 kms. Not all the camera boxes in Holland had cameras installed as it would be too expensive to have cameras on the highways every 1,5kms. Instead these would be routinely rotated. This means that people driving on the road did not know at each and every camera whether there was a camera or not. This resulted in drivers keeping to the speed limit as they were afraid of getting a fine in the post. By installing permanent cameras in plain view for all to see, it resulted in no traffic officials having to hide next to the roads of major highways and try catch speedsters. A team of officers was only required to rotate the cameras on a weekly basis. Traffic officials that do want to hide next to the roads and catch speedsters, could then do this on other roads in the cities and not on the highways. In regards to road worthy vehicles, in the Netherlands vehicles had to be licensed and roadworthy every year. This was done once a year upon expiry of the vehicles license by sending the vehicle to a recognized service center registered with the traffic department. So when your vehicle is serviced, the company servicing your vehicle would issue a roadworthy certificate and new license. No more standing in line for a new vehicle license. All registered vehicle servicing companies are then required by law to adhere to the roadworthy laws. If a vehicle is not roadworthy, the company servicing the vehicle is not allowed to release the vehicle to the owner until the owner makes the vehicle roadworthy. If the vehicle owner does not want it to be roadworthy or cannot, then the service garage confiscates the vehicle and arranges for it to be scrapped. To counter any service garages found to illegally roadworthy vehicles, they end up losing their license permanently and hence go out of business. Regarding speed and irresponsible drivers, in the Netherlands there are undercover police vehicles without visible police lights or markings. These vehicles are fitted with cameras front and back and a recording device. The undercover traffic officials patrol the roads and when they recognize an road user disobeying the rules of the road, they capture video footage of the person disobeying the rules of the road. Once done, they then activate a sign that pops up either in the front of their vehicle on the dashboard or in the back of their vehicle staring "police - follow me" and flashing police lights fitted to the interior of the unmarked police vehicle. The culprit found disobeying the rules of the road is then required to follow the unmarked police car to a public area like a petrol station or a mall or a police station and there the undercover police then inform the person disobeying the rules of the road of his offence. If the person does not believe the police, he has the opportunity of seeing the captured footage on a TV monitor inside the police vehicle. The culprit is then issued a fine on the spot or depending on the severity of the offence sometimes arrested and taken into custody. To make this type of "undercover traffic management" even more effective, there is a program on TV in the Netherlands where a team of camera men follow the undercover traffic offices and capture footage of the work the undercover traffic officers do and show it on TV in a program called "weg misbruikers" meaning "Road abusers". This then helps in making the public aware of the types of idiots on the roads in the Netherlands and the problems they cause. In the program the reason why a particular person is stopped is explain and what the correct rule of the road is. This program is very entertaining at times. To top it all, as currently implemented in South Africa, they also have a points system. Whereby road users loose points for illegal traffic offences. Well done here!! The point system is also highlighted in this TV program. Then, with all the automated systems set up by the traffic department to catch speeding drivers with the camera system, to catch road abusers with the undercover traffic vehicles, its then left up to the rest of the traffic depart meant to set up roadblocks at the petrol stations along the main highways (especially late at night)whereby they divert the traffic through the petrol station and stop persons to check drivers licenses and do a quick alcohol test and remove drivers not adhering to the alcohol level as required by law. In most cases there is a line drawn between drunk driver (far over the level) and drivers who are just over the legal limit. In the case of a driver just over the legal level, they give a warning, register it in a data base and request the driver to either have his passenger if he/she is sober to drive them home or phone someone to come collect them or in some cases, leave the vehicle there at the petrol station next to the highway and then taxis (arranged by the traffic department) takes the person home at their own expense...or if the person over the limit does not or cannot adhere to the prior mentioned, then they are taken into custody and requested to sleep the night in jail until sober. Please note, these persons are not arrested. However persons well over the limit or whom come up on the database as having been warned previously are arrested on the spot and taken to jail. I hope this information finds the correct person in government as I think this is definitely something we could invest in for the future of South Africa and our road users.

  • kfxnando - 2010-12-23 09:33

    yesterday, on a 3lane N12W past Alberton, was doing 90km/h(GPS) (speed limit 80km/h due to road works) Bus tailgating me, spot a new shape Golf JMPD coming past, tried to get his attention to the bus tailgating my car, Cop just ignored all waves out the window, bus backed right off!! how fast was the JMPD car going?? n...o blue lights or apparent emergency!! and with such attitudes from law enforcements the road death toll will continue!! sadly did knot get his number!!

  • Zolani - 2010-12-23 11:53

    I wish the would give acurate Statistics, more than 60 % each year are Pedestrians, wondering around busy roads, and 25% are Taxi's only 15% are from car crashes

      Mike - 2010-12-23 13:17

      Precisely!! Unfortunately its quite difficult to fine a pedestrian for speeding, so that little triviality gets downplayed. Speed consistently gets blamed when the fact is that stupidity kills far more than speed.

  • emmamimie - 2010-12-23 12:02

    Please do not tell us how many people have been killed, we would like to know how many in taxi, bakkie and truck related accidents. This is where our greatest number of people die on the road. I really do think that the general public is very aware of this drink and drive situation, taxi's and pickups especially in KZN area must be checked thoroughly they are the worst.

  • fred.mbazima - 2010-12-23 13:30

    It is that time of the year where innocent people loose their lives on the road. Last night I was watching Air Crash investigation, where incident investigator investigate put together complex puzzle to get to the bottom of the rout course of the incident. What I have notice incompletion of the investigation they make recommendation to the entire air line industry to prevent similar incident happening. My question is everyday on our road when we after incident happen we hear that the police are investigating. Is this investigation ever concluded, and recommendation is made to put in place measure to prevent a similar incident on that location or sport. I am saying this because there are certain location where incident happen every day and identical

  • IceBlaster - 2010-12-23 13:56

    Make that 876 deaths news of two taxi's colliding

  • Thriel - 2010-12-23 13:57

    i have said it a million times and no one listens. to minimise the road accidents and bring the death toll down by at least 90%, its simple, just put a barrier up on all national roads between oncoming traffic( a middle man ), that way if someone blows a tyre or something he doesnt swerve into oncoming traffic and kill innocent people. its something they should have done A LOOOONG TIME AGO, and sooner or later this will have to be implemented. but alas, this is the new S.A, they have chased away all the good road engineers and the few baboons running the country cant think past those flat noses.

      kfxnando - 2010-12-23 14:50

      great post and well put!! and the barrier will also stops the idiots who dont know what a solid white line stands for, from overtacking where its not safe!! on a recent holiday trip, while I was towing and still traveling at the speed limits (was not holding up the traffic, car more then strong enough to keep speed on any upheel) of those specific roads, was still being overtaken by Taxis, general cars, and 4x4s!!

  • sipho - 2010-12-23 14:15

    Why do people always mention roadworthiness as a factor with regards to accident rates? 7/10 accidents I see are very new, fancy cars which were surely roadworthy - and the other 3/10 involve taxis. The speed differential is the killer. Everyone must drive at a similar speed, which must be not much faster than the slowest road legal vehicle - that's a bicycle, so around 20km/hr would be about right.

      Zennie - 2010-12-26 17:43

      Thats true Sipho.

  • kfxnando - 2010-12-23 15:03

    after having read a bit more there is something else that came to mind that I often say!! well a few other things as well!! NO amount of laws and cop and speed traps will do much to change peoples behaviour and attitude!! we need real leaders who set the example: current examples, blue light brigade!! cops breaking every law they want us to follow: driving talking on the celphones, not wearing their seat belts, and driving recklessly just couz its not their vehicles!! our local SAPS cars go though a set of break pads and disks almost every month! Metro cops looking the other way: moving violations are the biggest killers!! and the coruption!! bikker killed on a highway, peoples 1st reaction, the bike must of been speeding!! quiet possible, however the idiot driving the car made a U-turn on the highway and did not see the bike coming!! highways in Germany have no speed limits, and very little accidents!! then again we the motorists is seen as the goose that lays the golden egg, and hence a target to be milked!!

  • comurray - 2010-12-23 20:01

    As there are at least 100,000 more vehicles than last year on our roads it is to be expected. Most drivers totally ignore speed limits and it appears that indicators on new vehicles are an optional extra. It will be even worse when it is time for holiday makers to return home as this is left to the last minute.

  • Cybermatix - 2010-12-23 21:07

    Maybe like democracy, rule of law, a judiciary that isn't infested with ruling party cronies, not having illiterate presidents that should be in jail for corruption, and the ruling elite not living of the taxpayers fat, driving a car is maybe too much of a "imperial west" thing. If we could move back to donkey carts, bicycles and walking as our main modes of transport, I'm sure the death rate on our roads would go down dramatically.

      Zennie - 2010-12-23 23:26

      Also I feel that the exam and test for drverslicences are at fault.My brothers son got his licence a month ago-I refuse to be a passenger in his car.He cant drive,what to say how he will react in a emergency situation.Got his training from a driverschool.Was tested at a speed of 40km/h the whole route.

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