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Abuse denies birthright - Xingwana

2011-11-27 08:20

Johannesburg - Child and women abuse denies those affected their birthrights, said Women and Children's Minister Lulu Xingwana.

"The scourge of child and women abuse threatens to erode many of the hard-earned gains of the liberation struggle," she said at a sod-turning ceremony of the Masego Kgomo memorial park in Soshanguve, Pretoria.

She questioned whether it could be that human beings, and specifically South Africans, had regressed to a point where society has turned into something worse than a jungle.

She said the government remained concerned that the combined figures of all sexual offences, including rape and indecent assault, had increased by 2.1% in 2010/11 compared to 2009/2010.

Xingwana noted that women murder cases had increased by 5.6% and sexual offences against children were up by 2.6% during this period.

"The government was confident that the strengthening of law enforcement measures, particularly the re-establishment of Family Violence, Child Protection and Sexual Offences units within the police would assist in turning the tide against these crimes.

"Abuse could not be fought with laws and policies alone, but with the help of citizens too," she said.

"We are here to make a clear and unambiguous statement that the barbaric actions of child and women abusers have no place in our free and democratic society."



Comments
  • Vegi - 2011-11-27 08:46

    I object to child abuse victims being lumped together with women abuse victims. These are two distinctly separate groups. Firtly children suffer the most horrible abuse at the hands of women e.g. those children who are thrown into toilet pits, dustbins, etc at birth; those children who are murdered by a jilted woman to spite the child's father; Those children who are systematically starved to early sickness and death because the woman controlling the purse strings is not the mother of the child; those children who are locked in rooms (sometimes burn to death) because the mother wants to go partying; those children who are abandoned with relatives because the mother has found a new lover who is not the father of the child, to endure years of neglect in the process; those children who are forced into the streets by the cruelty of the stepmother; those children who are abandoned for the flimsiest of reasons; etc etc etc The bottom line is that women are in the forefront of abuse of children and they should be depicted as such instead of being grouped with children as co-victims.

      Gail - 2011-11-27 20:06

      Vegi, while I take your point on many of the accusations levelled at woman abusing children, I think that in most of these cases one would have to ask "why" these women do these things and secondly "where" are the fathers of these children who should be there standing in the gap for those children? It takes a man and a woman to make a child and both of them should be involved in raising and providing for the children then there wouldn't be stepmothers or pregnant young girls who need clothes and food and education dumping their babies in pit toilets. In the majority of cases where children are abused by women it is because the fathers of those children are not facing up to their joint responsibility which is also a form of abuse. I know of a case where the father had a good job and led a woman to believe she was his only and fathered a child with her. She sued him for damages and costs and maintainence and he promptly stopped working and left the area. AIDS got him around the time his son became ndoda. Not all women are born mothers but in general they place the welfare of their child before their own unles the pregnancy was a way of earning cellphones etc from married working sugar daddies.

  • Faizie - 2011-11-27 11:20

    Child abuse isnt always about violence. How many south african males are not paying child support. My child is 4 and has little or no support from her father, the son of King Goodwill os the Zulus. SJ Zulu 0826612000. Legal action is slow and favours the male.

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