News24

'Halfway houses' for ex-prisoners?

2011-04-12 13:51

Cape Town - The correctional services department is to pilot a "halfway house" project that will serve as a transition facility for certain offenders between their life in incarceration and reintegration into communities.

Introducing debate on her budget vote in the National Assembly on Tuesday, Correctional Services Minister Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula said, initially, the pilot would focus on juveniles who had not been released on parole due to lack of formal addresses, as well as young people who were homeless at the time of their incarceration.

"We are currently in discussions with potential partners, both in government and private sector for support in achieving this and we should implement the pilot before the end of this year," she said.

Last year, an undertaking was given to give the issue of providing formal education a priority alongside programmess for skills development for offenders.

Considering that youth constituted close to 70% of the offender population, it had been decided to make formal education compulsory for all youth.

"This year we have engaged the department of basic education to have more centres registered as full-time schools."

Certain additional centres would now be eligible to offer the National Curriculum Statement syllabus for 2011.

These were the Usethubeni Youth Centre, St Albans, Barberton Medium, Barberton Maximum, Cradock Youth Centre and Emthonjeni Youth Centre.

"We are working towards declaring the 13 dedicated youth facilities out of the 241 correctional facilities in the country, full-time centres of learning," Mapisa-Nqakula said.

Comments
  • coolwaynie - 2011-04-12 13:59

    ....and of course the ever suffering taxpayer will foot this bill. A halfway house for criminals that have been released on early parole for murder and rape...sounds like a good idea...

      Thelma - 2011-04-12 14:47

      Don't forget the terminally ill criminals that live longer than a healthy law abiding citizen!!!!

      mev - 2011-04-12 20:46

      Seems like they're only sitting around thinking up reasons to get more money out of us, while at the same time drawing attention away from all the other half finished, poorly finished etc.. projects they've already received funding for.

  • gizzy - 2011-04-12 14:00

    Isn't parliament a half way house? Plenty of criminals there already!

  • Rob Gunning - 2011-04-12 14:10

    As long as it's nowhere near my house.

  • Gorilla - 2011-04-12 14:23

    Brilliant - just what we need. To spend more money on criminals.

      Thob3 - 2011-04-12 14:31

      What about the victims

  • Thob3 - 2011-04-12 14:30

    What about the victims? Queing and ill treated at welfare.

  • Thob3 - 2011-04-12 14:32

    What about the victims? Queing and ill treated at welfare.

  • Perfume - 2011-04-12 14:35

    And the families of the victims have they been forgotten....just asking

  • Luckybugger - 2011-04-12 14:45

    The Bastard ANC has to look after their first class citizens

  • The Futurist - 2011-04-12 14:46

    what are the changes of rehabilitating an animal ? lets do what Singapore did ... line up all the prisoners and shoot them dead .. regardless of offence (theft/murder/rape/fraud/etc.) ! Instant economy growth injection from millions of wasted tax money on criminals !! someone should bomb all prisons .. and poison its water !!

  • Virginia - 2011-04-12 14:49

    What is wrong with these ideas, we have to look at this as a start to get these children rehabilitated. We want the crime to stop in this country so we will have to accept they are trying to combat future crime. We all know that money has been wasted in this country on trivial things, but this is a very important project. Lets try an think differently when it comes to the government trying to spend money on projects that will be good for the county eventually.

      Thelma - 2011-04-12 14:52

      In order to cut our crime in S.A. we need to get rid of the ANC governance and then we can look at the criminal on the street. No use you try and combat crime on the streets when your government is committing crime on a daily basis.

      Luckybugger - 2011-04-12 15:00

      The only way to lower the crime rate is to create employment and the ANC is a counter productive bunch of criminals themselves only enriching their families and friends

      Luckybugger - 2011-04-12 15:00

      The only way to lower the crime rate is to create employment and the ANC is a counter productive bunch of criminals themselves only enriching their families and friends

      DW - 2011-04-12 15:09

      Virginia they are not talking about rehabilitating children here. They are talking about reintegrating criminals who have been sentenced to LIFE IMPRISONMENT. What good can there ever be for the country to cut these sentences short? Are you going to employ any of them when they are finally released?

      Grey B - 2011-04-12 15:48

      I agree Thelma. On the other, I would not care a bit if the ANC rule the country, as long as they deliver. But yes, they dont and should be removed if we want to see quick results.

      Barry - 2011-04-12 16:38

      This a good idea. One the the best the ruling party could ever come up with

  • Thelma - 2011-04-12 14:49

    Can we rather set up a halfway house for all the innocent victims subjected to the high crime rate in S.A.?

  • DW - 2011-04-12 15:06

    Life imprisonment should be just that - life in prison. There should be no reintegration into communities - EVER. The crimes committed by criminals who get life imprisonment are so heinious, hence the sentence. And after many, many years in prison, how will they be reintegrated? Who will give them jobs? How will they support themselves? Will you employ a criminal who was previously given the death sentence? They have learnt in jail from the best of the best criminals how to commit even worse crimes. This is a slap in the face of the victims and their families. If the death penalty was still around most of these criminals would no longer be around. As this is not the case, please dont make our crime situation even worse by letting these guys out, no matter how you softsoap their release.

  • DW - 2011-04-12 15:09

    Life imprisonment should be just that - life in prison. There should be no reintegration into communities - EVER. The crimes committed by criminals who get life imprisonment are so heinious, hence the sentence. And after many, many years in prison, how will they be reintegrated? Who will give them jobs? How will they support themselves? Will you employ a criminal who was previously given the death sentence? They have learnt in jail from the best of the best criminals how to commit even worse crimes. This is a slap in the face of the victims and their families. If the death penalty was still around most of these criminals would no longer be around. As this is not the case, please dont make our crime situation even worse by letting these guys out, no matter how you softsoap their release.

  • Douglas Hendry - 2011-04-12 15:15

    The Falklands perhaps? Or Tasmania. Australia used to deal with all sorts of criminal scum.

  • Grey B - 2011-04-12 15:43

    Good Idea. There must be a place where Prison is washed out of them, meaning gangs, etc, etc. We MUST make sure this rids them of any prison sindrome and that they are 100% rehabilitated before they are released back into society. I just wish there was a system where you are financially indebted to the government for what you have done and all expenses to date. That wil definitely put a price-tag on your crime.

  • Monica - 2011-04-12 16:06

    Maybe the Minister can use her R34million house to start off with!!!

  • croix - 2011-04-12 16:47

    Anti-social behaviour got them in prison 'for life' - now they will get educated for free (while decent, law abiding people are battling to pay school fees) and whose going to foot the bill? Somehow this idea seems totally skewed - if a prison cannot 'rehabilitate' a criminal, then what will a 'halfway house' do differently ? If it isn't a secure lockup facility, these criminals will be out of there before one can say "Mapisa -Nqakula".

  • croix - 2011-04-12 16:47

    Anti-social behaviour got them in prison 'for life' - now they will get educated for free (while decent, law abiding people are battling to pay school fees) and whose going to foot the bill? Somehow this idea seems totally skewed - if a prison cannot 'rehabilitate' a criminal, then what will a 'halfway house' do differently ? If it isn't a secure lockup facility, these criminals will be out of there before one can say "Mapisa -Nqakula".

  • croix - 2011-04-12 16:48

    Anti-social behaviour got them in prison 'for life' - now they will get educated for free (while decent, law abiding people are battling to pay school fees) and whose going to foot the bill? Somehow this idea seems totally skewed - if a prison cannot 'rehabilitate' a criminal, then what will a 'halfway house' do differently ? If it isn't a secure lockup facility, these criminals will be out of there before one can say "Mapisa -Nqakula".

  • Sydney - 2011-04-12 19:33

    Tony Leon: They are talking about juveniles and not dangerous criminals. Please understand the article b4 commenting. BigUps to the Minister for throwing a life line to the destitute juveniles who don't have anywhere to go after their release...

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