Jobless hostility rising - Ehrenreich

2013-10-24 22:27
Tony Ehrenreich (Picture: Die Burger)

Tony Ehrenreich (Picture: Die Burger)

Multimedia   ·   User Galleries   ·   News in Pictures Send us your pictures  ·  Send us your stories

Cape Town - Levels of hostility are growing among the unemployed, Cosatu Western Cape secretary Tony Ehrenreich warned on Thursday.

This was apparent in recent strike actions around the country, he said during a public dialogue in Cape Town on the future of trade unions, organised by the Centre for Conflict Resolution (CCR)

"We see it on the farms in probably the most glaring way, where close on two million farmworkers have been put off farmland... and we've seen the tensions in the protests and the strike actions... showing us a glimpse of the levels of hostility."

It had also been apparent in other strikes.

"The security guard strikes, or the strikes of motor workers and metal workers a few months ago; there [are] deepening levels of tension, partly around the growing levels of inequality in our society," he said.

The CCR is an independent African think tank, established in 1968 by the University of Cape Town (UCT). Its stated aim is to promote "constructive, creative and co-operative approaches to the resolution of conflict".

‘Advanced capitalist’

Earlier, Ehrenreich said levels of inequality were rising in many "advanced capitalist" countries, such as the UK, US and Japan.

They were rising in South Africa too.

"The reality is that the levels of inequality have risen in South Africa; and, if anything, we have a society that is more unequal now than what it was in the days of apartheid."

This was "the clearest indication yet" that the policies being pursued were not working.

"We've seen levels of unemployment rise from 15% in 1994, to close to 35% now."

He said the country was not putting in place the right industrial and economic strategies to absorb unemployed workers.

Despite the many achievements since 1994, and the roll out of houses and health care, "we've seen the levels of absolute poverty rise in many of our communities".

Ehrenreich said there was "a growing sense of protest, a growing sense of social dysfunction, and, to a large extent, a loss of hope" among many communities.

This was "palpable" in areas where protest was escalating.

"All of these things represent a time bomb... for our country as a whole," he said.

Read more on:    cosatu  |  tony ehrenreich  |  cape town  |  strikes

Join the conversation!

24.com encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions.
NEXT ON NEWS24X

24.com publishes all comments posted on articles provided that they adhere to our Comments Policy. Should you wish to report a comment for editorial review, please do so by clicking the 'Report Comment' button to the right of each comment.

Comment on this story
80 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Inside News24

 
PARTNER CONTENT
How much food do you need to concentrate?

We have been taught that we need three meals a day in order to make it through the day and while most of us indulge in more than our fair share there is a large portion of South Africans who are living off barely enough to sustain them.

/Sport

Book flights

Compare, Book, Fly

Traffic Alerts
Traffic
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Settings

Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.




Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.