News24

Joburg vows high-speed pothole fix

2011-07-27 12:18

Johannesburg - Upgrading and repair work on potholes, storm drains and traffic lights on 200 roads and intersections will be "accelerated" during a 90-day, R77m project, the Johannesburg Roads Agency (JRA) said on Wednesday.

"These issues are the ones that we will focus on, because their efficiency affects all motorists daily," spokesperson Thulani Makhubela said.

He said the agency aimed to close 17 000 potholes by September.

JRA managing director Dudu Maseko said The 90-day Project, which began in July, had already reconstructed over 10km of road in Naledi.

"Our work is serious, because we don't just want to fix the potholes, we are going to make sure that they never come back," she said.

She said the project would also ensure that traffic lights would remain fully functional in the event of power failures.

"Here in South Africa we are trendsetters, and we are 'greening' our traffic lights."

About 120 traffic lights would be backed up with uninterrupted power supplies (UPS), remote monitoring functions and power-saving LED lights.

The project would also focus on repairing storm water drainage on 15 major roads, and introducing a gravel roads stabilisation programme in selected townships.

"We are certain that the project will be successful. We want everyone to come to us and see when the 90 days are over," Maseko said.

 

Comments
  • Jamesons - 2011-07-27 12:36

    out of R77m, at least half of that will go into someones pocket, as I know the ANC, the money, she just went missing.

  • Theoniel Bosman - 2011-07-27 12:37

    Only after more than half of the R77m has disappeared through corruption ..ha ha ha

  • DMOSES270974 - 2011-07-27 12:52

    i have seen these guys fix pothole and trust me after the first rain or a pipe burst in the street they will have to refill it again

      Sean - 2012-02-07 20:40

      @Dmoses - I agree, I have never seen any of the "repaired" potholes not re-appearing! They allways re-appear so I would like to see what special epoxy they are going to use to prevent this from continuously happening again in the future!! You can spit on the road and tomorrow there will be a pothole that mirraculously appeared! And remember that if anything left to deteriorate long enough it is difficult to catch-up on the repairwork! It's like tooth-decay!

      Stefan Van Der Spuy - 2014-01-09 13:44

      Well, Maseko promised that the potholes were going to be fixed so well that they are "never going to come back". Maybe he planning to use concrete...

  • Razor - 2011-07-27 13:00

    we'll see. i only hope it will happen and not fade away somehow... i really hope.

  • Sisie - 2011-07-27 13:03

    Who are they kidding. This has taken 17 years - you call that high speed.

  • grant9 - 2011-07-27 13:07

    I'll only believe it when it's done otherwise it's just another empty promise.

  • Anonymous Thinker - 2011-07-27 13:12

    Should take a lesson from China. They fixed an entire highway in a week after the earthquake. Now why can't we be that efficient? Its not like we don't have the resources.

  • Sledgedarkwatch - 2011-07-27 13:15

    Really ?? a Hiigh Speed Pothole fix ? It will result a few days later in a Bigger high speed pothole. Please don't announce these issues in the press to look good cause you dont. Just do the job we taxpayers pay you for & stop bragging about things that should have done done PROPERLY in the first place.

  • Peacock - 2011-07-27 13:23

    "Here in South Africa we are trendsetters" Yeah right on - in ripping off the tax payer. "Our work is serious, because we don't just want to fix the potholes, we are going to make sure that they never come back," --- What a stupid statement - laughable, they can not even build a proper road with out it needing repair with in the first year, Close 17 000 potholes by September. - on dirt roads probably? how many has Outsurance filled in so far on tarred roads ? - (LeadSA) The JRA will obviously outsource the work and I wonder how much of the R 77m is going to end up in the back pocket of her's and her shamwans'

  • gcr - 2011-07-27 13:27

    The mayor of Joburg promised all these lovely services way back when he was sworn in - proof will be in the pudding since the same guy who is now mayor was the head honcho and in charge of the billing fiasco that is still with us. Talk is cheap actions cost money

  • johan - 2011-07-27 13:41

    I HOPE MALEMA IS NOT PART OF IT. IF HE IS, IT WILL BE DONE POORLY AND THE PROCEEDS WILL GO TO THE TRUST.

  • POLLENYS - 2011-07-27 14:12

    Some gravy train riders getting a wake-up call? Democracy working?

  • Johan - 2011-07-27 14:15

    "Here in South Africa we are trendsetters, and we are 'greening' our traffic lights." Hiervan hou ek, geen rooi ligte waar ek moet stop nie!!! hahaha

  • DIAMOND - 2011-07-27 15:18

    ..they can always borrow some bucks from somebodys "private" trust fund...mmmm..should be more than enough in there to help out..."Sharing is Caring"

  • Sisie - 2011-07-27 16:02

    They will fix 200 potholes at a price of R77million, wow that is R385000 each, what are they fixing it with gold. So all those thousands of potholes that Dial Direct Pothole Brigade fixed must be worth a fortune. They call this fast tracking, yes 17years later - i really would hate to see them when they work at extreme high speed. This is a crock.

      Sean - 2012-02-07 20:55

      The article mentions 17000 potholes........ :-)

  • Ken - 2012-02-07 19:55

    And you expect us to believe this ?

  • Sean - 2012-02-07 20:50

    I believe that seeing that it s the tax-ayer's money that is going to be used for this that transparrency of the contracts, funds etc. Shoud prevail throughout! Transparency - that is all that we are asking for, there will be more support and less irate people out there questioning every cent spent! Audit reports published in the national papers will be good! This way the government can perhaps re-gain the tax-payer's confidence!

  • Kuno - 2012-05-04 16:08

    The Dial Direct and LeadSA free pothole repair service, which had led to the fixing of over 30 000 potholes across the city, will cease operation on June 1. Clearely it seems that spending R77m on fixing potholes is cheaper than the free service we had from Dial Direct and LeadSA. Oh well who are we trying to fool here... most of the R77m will end up in someones back pocket... tshooo tshooo here comes the gravy train

  • Stefan Van Der Spuy - 2014-01-09 13:40

    I smell an election coming...

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