New unit to probe govt corruption

2010-09-28 12:22

Pretoria - A new unit to investigate corruption, fraud and maladministration within the government will be launched in November, Public Service and Administration Minister Richard Baloyi said in Pretoria on Tuesday.

It would operate at national, provincial and municipal level, he told the 2010 Conference of the Association of Southern African Departments of Public Administration and Management.

Explaining the reasons for the new unit, he said there were situations where the Auditor General had raised issues, but these were not being dealt with by the department concerned.


"Cases of the administration of discipline in the public service take long. You find a person is put on suspension for a long period of time. You are not finalising the disciplinary cases within a reasonable period of time.

"And you find that also even on the part of that person there is no compelling reason for that person to appear before a disciplinary hearing.

"They keep on postponing because this person is after all getting a salary at the end of the day."

Where the issues were criminal in nature, the unit would co-operate with law enforcement agencies.

More details would be released in early November on who would head up the unit and how it would be staffed.


Baloyi told the conference the country needed a public service capable of serving "beyond the predictable" and did not hide behind the excuse of limited resources.

He said it was worrying that the Public Service Commission made recommendations, and that these were never implemented or at least queried.

"We can't have such an important independent institution doing its work and you don't have a follow through in terms of implementation of the recommendations made."

A growing number of students were enrolling on public administration courses at tertiary institutions, but Baloyi questioned whether they were being given the relevant training. Tertiary institutions needed to "train people to serve people".

Many in the administration had the necessary academic qualifications for the positions they occupied, but still did not deliver the required service.

There was a need for regular interaction between the government and the institutions that offered public administration courses, he said.