SA witnessing a return to its past - expert

2015-10-21 16:16
(Jenna Etheridge, News24)

(Jenna Etheridge, News24)

Multimedia   ·   User Galleries   ·   News in Pictures Send us your pictures  ·  Send us your stories

Cape Town - Events on Wednesday will reverberate in our domestic politics for some time as student anger once again is assuming its place at the vanguard of protests against ineffective governance, political analyst Daniel Silke said.

He was commenting on the chaos that erupted outside Parliament on Wednesday when thousands of students opposing an increase in university fees, tried to storm the building, demanding to see Minister of Higher Education Blade Nzimande.

“South Africa is witnessing a return to its past as anger and frustration of a younger generation clashes with years of poor policy formulation and lack of implementation,” he said.

Silke said it was equally ironic that these protests happened on the day when the Finance Minister Nhlanhla Nene had to explain and confront a declining economy and weak economic performance. 

“It reflects the dismal state of the country's finances all in the context of vast inequality and the inability to adequately kick-start growth in the economy. 

“And students now - even those in SASCO [South African Student Congress] - will question their own 'mother' political movement, the ANC. This is disturbing for political parties like the ANC and even the DA, who will be seen as too conventional or failing to adequately press this issue.”

Ahead of the chaos, Silke said the EFF played the #Feesmustfall card to their political advantage as they attempted to postpone the mini budget. 

Outside of Parliament, student protests played into the “disruptive” style of politics exercised by the EFF and they are well placed to emulate the disruption taking place in the streets of Cape Town outside Parliament within the Chamber, he said.

Silke said it is a classic tale of two countries: MP's locked into a political vacuum in Parliament while emotions, frustrations and anger just steps away outside.

He said events in South Africa's Parliament will damage relations between the electorate and the executive. Political parties should be concerned.

According to him the executive seem to be oblivious to the chaos outside and will serve to damage the sceptical views the electorate have of their leadership.

Read more on:    eff  |  cape town  |  education  |  university fees  |  protests  |  parliament 2015

Join the conversation! encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions.

Inside News24

Financial advisors – Do you need one and should you get one?

The good, the bad, and everything else you need to know when considering hiring a financial advisor.


Book flights

Compare, Book, Fly

Traffic Alerts
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.


Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire network.


Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.