News24

Selebi's brother interrupts court

2010-04-19 12:28

Johannesburg - Jackie Selebi's corruption trial was adjourned briefly on Monday morning when his brother interfered with court proceedings, making comments and pacing up and down the South Gauteng High Court in Johannesburg.

Former police commissioner Selebi was being cross-examined by prosecutor Gerrie Nel when his brother George made gestures and told Nel that Selebi "can't answer".

This prompted Judge Meyer Joffe to order Selebi's counsel Jaap Cilliers to "deal with him".

"Is he part of the Selebi camp? I need you to deal with him. I'm not going to have his comments or interjections in court," said Joffe.

Brief meeting

Cilliers said he was not sure if the man, who was seated with Selebi's relatives, including Selebi's wife, was a family member.

He then followed the man outside court, along with Selebi and other family members for a brief meeting.

The man's interjections followed an argument of some sort between Nel and Selebi when Selebi took time to answer questions relating to a police reservist who was also being paid as a police informer.

The man, Paul Stemmet, was a registered police source who worked closely with Glenn Agliotti to give information to police relating to the smuggling of drugs and contraband goods into the country.

Nel had wanted to know why a police reservist was also being paid as an informer.

When Selebi stalled, Nel said: "For record purposes, you [Selebi] are not answering... standing hands on hips, staring at me".

At this Selebi's brother stood up and walked towards the exit, gesturing with his hands.

He then opened the door as if to walk out but then walked back in and went to sit with other family members.

File


When Selebi eventually answered, he took out a thick file and started reading some printed emails from it. Nel said it was not acceptable for Selebi to read from papers that were not filed with the court.

Selebi later explained that Stemmet was being paid as both a police informant and a reservist because the police had used the reservist title as a cover.

Nel then asked Selebi why Stemmet was an exception, considering he had taken offence when being told that Paul O'Sullivan worked as both a police reservist and head of security at the OR Tambo International Airport.

"O Sullivan is Irish and Stemmet is South African," answered Selebi.

When Nel probed further and asked if O'Sullivan being Irish was the only reason Selebi had had a problem with him being a police reservist, Selebi kept quiet and that is when his brother shouted, "He can't answer."

Selebi was facing a count of corruption and another of defeating the ends of justice in connection with at least R1.2m he allegedly received from Agliotti and others in return for favours.

The trial continues.