News24

Survey: South Africans back raising drinking age

2011-07-07 12:08

Cape Town - Two-thirds of South Africans polled in a recent survey believe raising the legal drinking age to 21 would curb alcohol abuse, a market research company said on Thursday,

Out of 500 respondents, more than 60% also said drunken driving would be reduced if the government implemented a proposal by Social Development Minister Bathabile Dlamini to ban the sale of alcohol to people under 21.

"The results of the survey demonstrate public concern around alcohol abuse and support for governments' current and proposed actions against it," said Synovate's managing director Jake Orpen.

Ninety percent of those interviewed said underage drinking was a problem in South Africa and 78% said government had a duty to do something about it.

In May, Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi said he planned to fight for a ban on all forms of tobacco and alcohol advertising.

That proposal is encountering considerable opposition, with critics warning that it would result in a loss of revenue of R2.6bn.

But Synovate said 65% of those interviewed for its survey thought banning alcohol advertising was a good idea.
 

Comments
  • OLIBO - 2011-07-07 12:23

    Where was this survey conducted and who are the respondents?

      saabnut - 2011-07-07 12:30

      "...Out of 500 respondents, more than 60% also said drunken driving would be reduced..." What utter trash. Drunken driving can and will only ever be addressed by imposing proper penalties. At the moment, all one gets is a fine and a slap on the wrist. Heaven forbid you are a judge that is caught- hell you even go on special state paid leave for 8 years while trying to squash the case...

      paulf - 2011-07-07 12:30

      Take note, they said 2/3rds of South Africans Polled in a survey. Only 500 responded. I think it is very poor reporting LOL

      Worldwise - 2011-07-07 12:40

      Exactly. And only 500 people were asked. If this was an election and you asked the right 500 people, you could get any party into power. Or any answer you desire for a survey. El Cheapo market research company gets you el cheapo results.

      Shadoz - 2011-07-07 13:18

      I don't think this will help all i think it will do is make them drink behind our backs and cause worse problems than when we know about it. It is not the AGE of drinking that is the problem it is us that is not educating the kids on the hazards of drinking.

      Richard Townley-Johnson - 2011-07-07 13:39

      "Drunken driving can and will only ever be addressed by imposing proper penalties" Not really... It will only be addressed by creating easy, cheap and present alternative transportation. There are heavy penalties to drinking and driving already (if you get caught that is.. And if you are not a government official). What I found odd though, is that they were talking about how underage drinking is an issue. Raising the drinking age certainly won't address this issue. I think that drinking in general has become an issue worldwide though and it can only have positive benefits to minimize the abuse of alcohol.. I do question whether this approach is going to work.

      Lyndatjie - 2011-07-07 13:52

      The respondents were the sober tee-totallers, because those that drink were too busy nursing hangovers to respond... *gets the hell out of Dodge City*

      Krush - 2011-07-07 15:42

      The problem is not the law, its the implementation of it. You can't stop the drug addicts and that is completely illegal, how are you going to stop under 21's from drinking? I constantly see under 18's completely sloshed. Goodluck.

      Coyote_za - 2011-07-07 15:48

      @ paulf: the rest were out drinking when they did the poll

      Alex Dowding - 2011-07-07 16:29

      Yet another example of trying to address the symptoms of the alcohol industry superficially without looking at the root cause of the problem.

      Mark - 2011-07-08 01:35

      "Like most people, I have never seen a pollster." Thomas Sowell

      farmworker - 2011-07-08 08:37

      I don't that will ever be a solution, how about you increase the voting age as well while you at it.

  • jean.dutoit - 2011-07-07 12:23

    Wow. Just wow. This kind of stupid deserves no comment.

      Martin - 2011-12-15 08:36

      If you raise the legal drinking age, then underage drinking will become more of a problem. I propose lowering the legal drinking age, then, by definition, less people will be engaged in "underage drinking".

  • CharlSkeptic - 2011-07-07 12:26

    These polls are utter rubbish. For may reasons. I wished that the SA Government and society as a whole would start to realise that you cannot legislate yourself out of social problems. Raising the legal drinking age, will create more underage drinkers! Eduation, job creation through sustainable economic policy and proper policing are called for.

      crackerr - 2011-07-07 12:35

      Exactly. The anti-drinkers are usually the ones who have it relatively easy in life. Jobs (relatively cosy ones), future prospects, belief systems (usually self-bluff but never mind), etc. Leave people alone.

      Badballie - 2011-07-07 13:10

      except that the highest rate of alcohol related incidents involve kids under 25. Holding parents responsible for their children must be enforced as well. If your child is found drunk and disorderly you need to be locked up and appear in court as their legal guardian. The 21 age limit overseas has for the most part been successful and the holding of parents as accountable for their minor children has also greatly reduced the incidents as well

      Spoedvark - 2011-07-07 13:13

      Exactly, Charl. At 18 a youngster becomes a legal adult (in terms of the Constitution). No amount of sensation seeking or populist politics is going to change that. The problem is, as per usual, being addressed back to front. If 14 year olds have access to alcohol, how is "raising the drinking age" to 21 going to address the problem? This is indeed a huge problem, but it should be addressed as a social problem - not a legal one. Information, education and proper policing will help - unconstitutional appeals to emotion will not. At 18 you have the "advantages" of being an adult. Let these youngsters take the disadvantages as well. Lock up drunk drivers af ALL ages. If a young man of 18 - 19 thinks he can "take his drink," let him ponder the fallacy of his argument in jail.

      Matt - 2011-07-07 14:52

      @ Spoedvark - "If a young man of 18 - 19 thinks he can "take his drink," let him ponder the fallacy of his argument in jail." Agreed, problem is that it's way too easy to drink and drive in SA... when I worked late and drove home, almost every evening there was a drunk swerving all over the place... and I've heard of seriously drunk people getting stopped by police and still not getting lumbered! Sad to say I've done it, only once some 5 years ago, and never again - I was scared all the way home!

      Jakes4 - 2011-07-07 14:54

      Hardly a statistically valid sample. Poor (proposed) legislation like this creates criminals that aren't really criminals and taxes an already overloaded legal system unnecessarily further. It is also policed poorly because most policemen with savvy try and overlook stupid laws and so only a few unlucky suckers gets a criminal record just like what happened after legal driving BAC was lowered to 0.05. Government should focus on making proper laws that can be policed properly and uplifting society to solve social problems and stop trying to implement laws from other first world countries that are also not solving their problems. Most of us started drinking at 18 and we turned out just fine so I guess blaming alcohol doesn't really cut it.

  • DAB - 2011-07-07 12:26

    Get real! They can't even police the age restriction of under 18, how do they expect to implement and police the higher age restriction?

      Brieuse - 2011-07-07 12:28

      wondering the same thing

      Thor - 2011-07-07 13:25

      The "majority" in our country needs to learn respect for law and order and respect for authority before anything like this will ever work. As long as we have members of the "majority" stoning police they can make laws until they are blue in the face.

  • N - 2011-07-07 12:29

    Seriously, how many kids say 'no' to alcohol because they're underage?

  • Nunya - 2011-07-07 12:30

    Yes, but you can get married and have children, join the police and shoot people at 18, but not drink.....who was mr & mrs Stupid that proposed these plans? If kids can get hold of alcohol now, do you think pushing 21 is going to stop them? This is like in old SA where you had to go to the army and kill people at 16, but were not allowed to watch a 2-21 movie, although you could be married and have your own kids at 18...idiots!!!

      InternetMan - 2011-07-07 12:35

      Actually anybody can do anything at any age anywhere under any government. Just gotta learn to net get caught.

      WallFly - 2011-07-07 13:56

      They might have gotten the idea from the USA... everyone wants to be like the USA, so why not try out their laws?

      daaivark - 2011-07-07 15:03

      Getting married at 18 doesn't place you behind the wheel of a lethal weapon when you are too pissed to stand.

      elbie - 2011-07-07 17:41

      Get married at 18 without permission - yes. Have a toast of champagne at your own wedding - NO.

  • blowup - 2011-07-07 12:32

    They want to create jobs. This is only going to take jobs. Think of it less money in the economy means less job opotunities

      saabnut - 2011-07-07 12:37

      And more poverty and substance abuse...

      daaivark - 2011-07-07 14:54

      And how exactly does this "take jobs"? I don't know any places that serve ONLY 18 to 21 year-olds. Get real.

  • John - 2011-07-07 12:33

    I, and I am sure many people are like me, that they have never been asked or know anybody who has been asked to take part in these surveys. As for the results of these surveys, I also find vey few people agree with the result. 500 people can hardly be called a representative sample of the South African population.

  • Steyts - 2011-07-07 12:33

    It is just gonna cause more illegal drinkers, those aging between 18 and 21.. It won't change anything!

      Agnostic - 2011-07-07 16:01

      That is the whole point. Currently people under the age of 18 are drinking because they look old enough to walk into a bottle store and buy it. They are just trying to make it more difficult for people under the age of 18 to have easy access. I know it won't stop those that really want to drink, but it will deter those that might be a little curious but don't want to take a chance. It also gives the people selling the booze at legit bottle stores a better guestimate of a persons age. 15 looks a lot different to 21. Just my opinion.

  • Worldwise - 2011-07-07 12:37

    Shows how ignorant two thirds of South Africans are. How can anyone over 18 be underage when 18 and not 21 is now the age that majority is attained? At 18 you can sign a contract, drive a car or watch a porn movie, but you can't drink. How stupid. Who has a hidden agenda here? So raising the drinking age will curb drunken driving? Has anyone researched the ages of those convicted of drunken driving? Most of them are over 21.

      Badballie - 2011-07-07 13:20

      Firstly in terms of the law you require an adult (parent) to sign surety on most contracts for persons under 21. Secondly the 21 age limit in America showed a drop of 25% in accidents involving minors within 3 years of the age restriction change. currently approx 30% of all alcohol related offenses can be attributed to persons under the age of 21 DRIVING Daddy's car. If Parents accepted responsibility for their offspring the state wouldn't. This idea as well as the echelon (RICA) act as well as the AFIS (automated fingerprint identification system) not to mention GPS software are all American systems sold to the South African government after 1994, which tells you who's agenda we dancing to.

      Spoedvark - 2011-07-07 13:42

      Gotta do something popular, Worldwise, even if it is moronically stupid. We have to play to the ignorant, remember?

      elbie - 2011-07-07 17:49

      Badballie, afraid you are wrong about the law and 21 and signing of contracts. Has been changed to 18. Then one is fully competent to freely transact, without assistance of guardian(s). For some time already, methinks.

      Worldwise - 2011-07-07 21:40

      Thanks Elbie. Not many people in SA seem to know that the age of adult independence in SA is 18. If your daughter wants to leave home or go out with friends at 18 without your permission she can. Stop her and you can face a criminal charge. You can get married without parental consent at 18 but you're not allowed to have champagne at your wedding? Get real.

      zistros - 2011-07-08 08:47

      lets increase the voting age to be 21 and see how government policies will change then...

  • McDaNife - 2011-07-07 12:40

    We have more serious problems on hand to sort out than you laughable survey - 500 people! Concentrate on your service deliveries which is in a shambles.

  • Joe - 2011-07-07 12:40

    Isn't there more important things to worry about in this country than alcohol and smoking laws.

  • Sharief - 2011-07-07 12:43

    wont work...

  • Grace - 2011-07-07 12:45

    Alcohol should be banned entirely !

      Tom - 2011-07-07 13:12

      Grace they tried that in America! It failed miserably to the point that it became a crime industry that caused countless murders. Please check your facts before saying silly things. Further, increasing the drinking age will not solve a thing, people will always find a way to get a hold of what they want, and placing laws to prohibit people’s activities just makes the forbidden fruit taste better. We DO NOT need more laws we need to raise our children to respect themselves and each other. Laws will never ever be a replacement for character...

      biskit - 2011-07-07 13:13

      Just imagine how much more bitter people would be if you did that!

      Thor - 2011-07-07 13:27

      Ja Grace then we would all walk around like we have brooms up our arses like you. What a stupid comment.

      Matt - 2011-07-07 14:43

      @ Grace - I agree fully! People will disagree and say there's no harm in the occasional dop, or getting motherless once in a while... I haven't touched a drop in over a year (I'm not a recovering alchie, just decided it wasn't worth the effort) and it's quite surprising - you CAN have fun without alcohol! Plus, no horrible hangover the next morning or smelly clothes...

      Matt - 2011-07-07 14:45

      @ Tom - I understand that when something is banned, people will try harder to get hold of it - but going by that logic, why bother even having laws or outlawing something? Oh there are good reasons for certain laws...

      Tom - 2011-07-07 15:57

      @Matt: I agree that laws should exist, especially the laws that govern how people's behavior impacts on another's rights. In this instance I also agree that a law to set the minimum age limit on alcohol consumption is correct, but now the powers that be are tampering with something pointless that will just create more weight on an already burdened system. Complicating the law system just makes life more difficult then is has to be. GENERALLY people have a sense of right and wrong, getting in their face's and telling what they can and can not do just creates rebellion. Further more on how happy you are about not drinking; I agree one does not have to drink to have a good time, I am just saying it is not yours or my place to say whether or not they should.

      Alex Dowding - 2011-07-07 16:05

      Raising the drinking age is an exercise in futility as it doesn't address the reasons behind youngsters wanting to engage in the behaviour. I'd question the effectiveness of imposing a ban of any kind as history tends to illustrate quite clearly how this can have a reverse psychological effect leading instead to increased rates of usage amongst the target population. A better plan would be to spend more money on educating people about the harms of things like binge drinking and how excessive alcohol use can lead to abuse and risky sexual behaviour, which in turn can lead to unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections, etc. I doubt whether alcohol will ever be banned outright due to society's acceptance of it, but one thing people should do (and probably will in the next 10 years) is legalize, regulate and tax dagga. It is a far safer alternative to alcohol and in my opinion gives a much nicer buzz with no hangover the next day! It also tends to make people friendlier instead of bringing out the worst in them like alcohol so often does. Show me one pot smoker who verbally or physically abuses his or her loved ones! This in stark contrast to alcohol, which is implicated in 78% of violent crimes. Anyone who lives with an alcoholic will know how much of a nightmare it can be! The same dreaded cycle playing out day after day. Just goes to show how wrong our government actually are in their assessment of the situation.

      StBad - 2011-07-07 21:44

      It would curb the burth rate... probably make SAfrica a better looking nation!!!

      jacques - 2011-09-06 07:52

      What is my neighbor going to do if his alcohol is taken away from him? He absolutely cannot live without it - we have come to know him as an absolute PIG on weekends.LOL

  • Siener2 - 2011-07-07 12:47

    If this becomes law, there will of course be another unforseen side effect - which is clearly visible in the US - more teenage drug abuse. If drugs and alcohol are both prohibited, people will reason that they may as well go for the most bang for their buck.

  • joy.termorshuizen - 2011-07-07 12:50

    RUBBISH! laws only work if they are implemented....we have strict anti smoking laws...no talking on mobile phones while driving laws....all to NO avail because no laws are enforcedin this lawless society!

  • Playnice - 2011-07-07 12:50

    They should rather increase the iq limit to 21 to get into government

  • Andy - 2011-07-07 12:51

    I think it's a good idea. Lets face it 16 year olds have been sneaking into pubs for years. So now maybe some 18 year olds will be getting in, but this is a better age.

      CharlSkeptic - 2011-07-07 13:11

      LOL

  • kalabafazi - 2011-07-07 12:53

    Whilst they are about it, why not raise the legal voting age to 21. Or maybe that plan was scrapped after they polled 500 south Africans and discovered the ANC would loose the elections.

      kalabafazi - 2011-07-07 13:24

      Er lose the elections

  • ecm - 2011-07-07 12:53

    government must lead by example and ban alcohol at all state functions - will be a huge saving of taxpayers money as they only buy the most expensive stuff! No alcohol should be bought with taxpayers or ratepayers money!

      CharlSkeptic - 2011-07-07 13:12

      You are now starting to screw up a good story with cold reality. WON'T HAPPEN...

  • Susannomore - 2011-07-07 12:54

    Hear, hear. There are far too many lives ruined by people who drink at 18 -19 and think they can handle it. A son of a friend on mine lost 2 friends this weekend to drunk driving. They were 19 and decided they could "handle it" when climbing behind the wheel of a car. Grow up, learn about the world, then drink the sorrows of what you have learnt away.

  • bumblebee - 2011-07-07 13:04

    Sorry , but I just cannot fathom the rationale behind this - At what age can a person vote, legally obtain a drivers licence, have a legal abortion, legally smoke, be sent to an adult prison? .... and they want the age to have a drink changed to 21….

  • Badballie - 2011-07-07 13:06

    Parents must also be held responsible for underage children who are found in the possession of or under the influence of alcohol. Parents have over the last 20 or so years given up on trying to control their children because of this the kids of today lack discipline and respect. arresting the parent of children will ensure accountability and control by parents as well

  • Mighty_Whitey - 2011-07-07 13:10

    I totally agree, I have lost family and friends because of teenage drunk drivers. Problem is that if a drunk driver has R200 in his wallet he can get away scott free.

  • Darwinian - 2011-07-07 13:19

    To all the posters here, please stage your age, when you got drunk for the first time. I was 14. Not that I'm proud about it, but it just shows that regardless of all the liquor laws, teens will always get pissed. I say, ban alcohol completely!

      Markal - 2011-07-07 13:24

      Problem is Darwinian, that as with anything that's bad for us (cigs, booze, unhealthy foods etc.) there is still way too much money to be made before such bans will be put into place. Just another example of how, once again, the almighty dollar is elevated above the sanctity of human life.

      Playnice - 2011-07-07 13:27

      And then they'll use other stimulants. Do we then ban glue, cough medicine, pain killers.....

      Matt - 2011-07-07 14:47

      I'm 31 next month, first time I got drunk was 17 I think (but that was in Holland where the legal age was 16 for beer)... a year after I was legally allowed to! And agreed - ban alcohol!

      Alex Dowding - 2011-07-07 16:58

      Most of the people I know started drinking at the ages of around 14-16. Take Britain for example, which has among the world's highest rates of under-age binge drinking. In 2009 it was suggested that a third or more 11-15 year olds are drinking regularly. From 2008 to 2009 it was found that not only was there a general rise in the proportion of 11 to 15-year-olds who drink alcohol regularly, but also that there was an increase in the amount they are drinking on each occasion. "Binge" drinking every now and then tends to be far more harmful to health than drinking a moderate amount occasionally. The trend of binge-drinking is very bad indeed even here in South Africa from what I have experienced on nights out in drinking establishments in Cape Town, in particular Claremont, Observatory and Long Street. Fake ID's are commonly used to success. It does indicate that laws are not being enforced strenuously enough both on the part of the bars, clubs and off-licenses or by the police. A spokesman for the British Medical Association said: "There is a need for government action to address the problems of underage and teenage drinking. "This must involve changes to legislation, responsible marketing, effective monitoring of the drinks industry and health education.

  • Spoedvark - 2011-07-07 13:20

    Yeah, right. I wonder who they polled? Judging by the comments on this page, they did not get a representative sample at all.

  • Gennath - 2011-07-07 13:27

    Dear government. Please fix the authorities and enforcers of laws before you try to implement new ones.

  • DEVILS SON - 2011-07-07 13:30

    UPPING the age will do nothing, i was buying booze when i was 14, nothing will stop a kid who wants a drink, for 10 bucks a hobo will go into the store and buy. it wont reduce the drunken driving because drunks like to drive, it seems like a good idea after a few, besides there is no alternative transport thats safe and reliable, where you dont need to walk several km to find a bus stop, besides busses dont run late into the evening to my knowledge. i personally pay no attention to advertising in general, all the booze advertising is punted on me by my mates, from school days up until now. they let me in on new drinks and thats that, the advertising is just a waste of money when it comes to me.

  • Civil_Rights - 2011-07-07 13:32

    raising the legal drinking age to 21 won't curb alcohol abuse. They should've conducted that survey in parliament becoz that's a drunkared's natural habitat. Regardless people are still going to drink. Politicians should lead by example.

  • Moipone Bokaba - 2011-07-07 13:40

    We are saying they should not drink but on the other end we say the can have an abortion at 12 years and entlitled to contraceptives. What is wrong with this picture, eligible to vote at 18 years, drivers license at 16 and sometimes the youth are emancipated majors...where will you draw the line. I agree that they have to curb drinking but then is it drinking alone that causes the social ills of our society or is it the eroded morals and lack of respect. The government always speaks with a forked tongue and where is Dupius(sic) Malema cos these is where he should be his focal point.

  • Hugh - 2011-07-07 13:49

    Oh great stuff and who is going to police it. They cannot stop under 18's from getting drunk nor keep drunks off the roads.

  • K.W.F.L - 2011-07-07 13:54

    "In May, Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi said he planned to fight for a ban on all forms of tobacco and alcohol advertising." He must rather focus on saving lives and upgrading our health care services than to worry about banning tabacco and alcohol advertising...!!!???

  • Gavin Mannion - 2011-07-07 13:57

    I agree because no one under the age of 21 drinks in America... oh no wait... that heavily policed first world country can't stop people drinking underage so why does our government think this will make a blind bit of difference? Rather drop the drinking age to 16 so that people are used to getting drunk before getting a licence to drive.. then they can stop being stupid at 18.. this policy will just move the problem to when people are 20

  • N B - 2011-07-07 13:57

    I'm not sure and dont understand how they can do that if the age of majority is 18. If you are considered an adult at the age of 18 how can the goverment tell you that you can not drink. I live in the USA and the 21 law is garbage because they all drink anyway so what good does that really do you?

  • Seth - 2011-07-07 14:02

    I've been drinking since I was 16. And so were most of the kids at my school. Making it 21 might keep the little trouble makers out of clubs but it wont change a thing. Government can NOT decide what freedoms free people can and cannot enjoy. Doing so only creates an underground illicit market just look at the popularity of daga the industry is booming in SA. In the end of the day everyone is responsible to themselves that is what freedom is about. If there is a problem with kids it is normally the fault of parents who never realized that a part of parenting means teaching not just giving.

  • Esperanza - 2011-07-07 14:09

    The people taking the survey were drunk when they gave their responses

  • MC2010 - 2011-07-07 14:10

    Yes please!

  • Moipone Bokaba - 2011-07-07 14:10

    We are saying they should not drink but on the other end we say the can have an abortion at 12 years and entlitled to contraceptives. What is wrong with this picture, eligible to vote at 18 years, drivers license at 16 and sometimes the youth are emancipated majors...where will you draw the line. I agree that they have to curb drinking but then is it drinking alone that causes the social ills of our society or is it the eroded morals and lack of respect. The government always speaks with a forked tongue and where is Dupius(sic) Malema cos these is where he should be his focal point.

  • Moipone Bokaba - 2011-07-07 14:11

    We are saying they should not drink but on the other end we say the can have an abortion at 12 years and entlitled to contraceptives. What is wrong with this picture, eligible to vote at 18 years, drivers license at 16 and sometimes the youth are emancipated majors...where will you draw the line. I agree that they have to curb drinking but then is it drinking alone that causes the social ills of our society or is it the eroded morals and lack of respect. The government always speaks with a forked tongue and where is Dupius(sic) Malema cos these is where he should be his focal point.

  • Moipone Bokaba - 2011-07-07 14:11

    We are saying they should not drink but on the other end we say the can have an abortion at 12 years and entlitled to contraceptives. What is wrong with this picture, eligible to vote at 18 years, drivers license at 16 and sometimes the youth are emancipated majors...where will you draw the line. I agree that they have to curb drinking but then is it drinking alone that causes the social ills of our society or is it the eroded morals and lack of respect. The government always speaks with a forked tongue and where is Dupius(sic) Malema cos these is where he should be his focal point.

  • Moipone Bokaba - 2011-07-07 14:11

    We are saying they should not drink but on the other end we say the can have an abortion at 12 years and entlitled to contraceptives. What is wrong with this picture, eligible to vote at 18 years, drivers license at 16 and sometimes the youth are emancipated majors...where will you draw the line. I agree that they have to curb drinking but then is it drinking alone that causes the social ills of our society or is it the eroded morals and lack of respect. The government always speaks with a forked tongue and where is Dupius(sic) Malema cos these is where he should be his focal point.

  • agagiano - 2011-07-07 14:14

    "" Ninety percent of those interviewed said underage drinking was a problem in South Africa and 78% said government had a duty to do something about it." well raising the legal drinking age is only going to cause more underage drinking.....defeats the pupose

  • windreav3r - 2011-07-07 14:16

    Two-thirds of the country is aged above 21...

  • Agnostic - 2011-07-07 14:18

    I think it might be a good thing. Yes, I am a drinker. I have been a long time. I think they want to do it because they want to make it more difficult for under 18's to be able to get booze. If you are 15 a lot of places will sell you booze because you look 18, but if the limit is upped you can clearly see the difference between 15 and 21. Also, the government is taking steps because parents don't. I was drinking at a young age and it is irresponsible, I think they should make the legal age for everything 21. This inculdes smoking, drinking as well as voting. Just so that you can get some life experience before making life long choices.

  • Daniel - 2011-07-07 14:19

    Raising the drinking age to 21, what are they trying to do ? Keep alcohol out of the schools ?

  • Harold - 2011-07-07 14:19

    No it won't curb alcohol abuse, the roots of abuse do not lie in the age of the drinker.

  • jock - 2011-07-07 14:29

    it will be just another law that will not be enforced

  • Enigma - 2011-07-07 14:30

    I am posting this comment again which was deleted for what I don't know. @ the 18 you are allowed to vote, you can get married and can be prosecuted because according to our con-stitution you are regarded as an adult. Then how the hell can you not be served alcohol if you can do all these other things. Please South African govt make up your damn minds and stop wasting time and money on stupid laws!!!!!!

  • Bokmad - 2011-07-07 14:41

    The facts are that it does not work, the only thing it achieves is to criminalise a vast majority of that sector of the population and creating an opportunity for black market ventures. You only have to look at other countries with a 21 age limit. Teenagers will drink, wether it is legal or not.

  • Glenys - 2011-07-07 14:42

    This will not stop those underage binge drinkers from drinking - they are able to drink now, and raising the age limit is not going to make 1 iota's difference to where they get it from. As long as there are more than 4 bottle stores in a 2 kilometer radius the binge drinking will carry on. In the area where I reside, wihthin a 5 k radius there are over ten bottlestores, more than 10 pubs etc where people dont care what age you are, and wine whenever you like it from the convenience store - does this pass on a message that drinking is an ok pastime - THINK ABOUT IT!

      Enigma - 2011-07-07 14:55

      Dude, 5km is long. In Milnerton Cape Town in a 200m street almost every 3rd house is a shebeen. It's now school holidays and the parents are @ work these so called under age drinkers have nothing to do @ home. So to avoid boredom lets go drink because it's holidays. Do you think the shebeen owners are gonna say no when business is booming? Hell no, it's business as usual. The only solution govt should do is come with more youth projects to keep these kids busy all the time.