News24

Gauteng ANCYL to elect new leaders

2010-08-12 07:40

Johannesburg - The ANC Youth League in Gauteng will hold its provincial elective conference this weekend, it secretary general Vuyiswa Tulelo confirmed on Wednesday.

Tulelo would meet the provincial leadership on Thursday to finalise the details. The venue was not yet known.

The ANCYL's provincial congresses have been chaotic, so far. Its Eastern Cape and Limpopo chapters have taken their battles with national leadership to court.

Factions charge that ANCYL president Julius Malema is saturating provincial leadership with his sympathisers to secure a second term at the helm next year.

Indications were that the battle for the position of ANCYL chairperson in Gauteng would be between Malema ally Thabo Kupa and former provincial secretary Lebogang Maile.

At the moment, the position is held by Jacob Khawe.

In a statement on Wednesday, Tshwane's inner city chairperson Titus Sebesho confirmed his availability for the provincial secretary post.

Twin tasks

"It seems people have forgotten the twin tasks of the ANCYL and the reason for its existence; it is not there to serve a few individuals' financial and personal interests," he said.

While it was not the culture or the tradition of ANC or ANCYL members to announce their ambitions, Sebesho said he had been approached by a "number of comrades" to stand for the post.

He said West Rand regional chairperson Simon Molefe would challenge Maile for the position of chairperson.

The ANCYL in Mpumalanga held what it described as a successful conference at the end of July.

Elected as chairperson was Kgotso Motloung; deputy chairperson Chris Nkuna; secretary Johan Mkhatshwa; deputy secretary Themba Masombuka; and treasurer Lerato Theko.

The branch said it supported a second term for Malema, who would lead the league towards the ANC's centenary in 2012.

A poll on Wednesday revealed that Malema's popularity has dropped in the last six to seven months.

The TNS survey found that Malema's support base had decreased by more than a third, with most people feeling he had not been sufficiently punished by the ruling party for numerous disciplinary offences.