News24

Zuma quells land grab fears

2011-06-27 15:32

Midrand - Land reform must be conducted within the confines of the Constitution, President Jacob Zuma said on Monday.

"Land reform is urgent but requires careful handling and consultation, and must be conducted within the confines of the Constitution," he said at the Congress of SA Trade Unions' (Cosatu) central committee meeting at Gallagher Estate in Midrand.

"We are in the process of finalising a green paper that will set a new trajectory for land reform in South Africa," he said.

Zuma said the land question remained a "national priority".

ANC Youth League president Julius Malema sparked an outcry recently when he called for land redistribution without compensation.

Land redistribution 'moving very slowly'

The ANC moved to quell fears of Zimbabwe-style land grabs saying ANCYL resolutions did not alter ANC policies being implemented at government level.

Zuma admitted that the settlement of outstanding restitution claims and the redistribution of land to African people had proceeded "very slowly".

He again conceded that the "willing buyer, willing seller" policy had not yielded the desired result.
The fundamentals of the new approach to land to be outlined in the green paper include de-racialising the rural economy; democratic land allocation and use across gender, race and class and strict production discipline for food security.

"Central to the policy proposals will be the three-tier land tenure system... These are firstly that state and public land will be leasehold.

"Secondly, other land will be available on freehold, with limitations or ceilings on the extent of land, a person or body can own. Thirdly, policy will provide for precarious tenure for non-South Africans," he said.

Alliance unity stressed

Zuma again emphasised that all ANC and government policies remained "valid" and that they were being implemented.

He urged Cosatu delegates to remain united and stressed the importance of unity in the ruling alliance between the ANC, Cosatu, the SA Communist Party and the SA National Civics Organisation.

"We must prioritise the unity and cohesion of the ANC and that of the alliance. More importantly we must prioritise the unity of all South African people black and white.

"We must also continue building hope in our country, and strengthen the ANC so that it can continue to play its role as the glue that holds South African society together."

Muted applause

Zuma wrapped up his talk with a song which broke the sombre mood prevalent during his address. He then sang Mshini Wam', before leaving the podium.

His lengthy address was dotted with muted applause from delegates as he spelled out the reasons he felt the ANC was in crisis.

The Sunday Independent this weekend reported that Cosatu would take a decision on whether it would support Zuma for a second term at the four-day meeting.

Cosatu had long voiced its dissatisfaction over Zuma's leadership after playing a key role in his rise to power.

Cosatu general secretary Zwelinzima Vavi has ruled out the possibility of debate at the meeting on the ANC's 2012 succession. The ANC itself has urged its members not to prematurely raise succession talks.

Comments
  • morentebo - 2011-06-27 15:42

    wara wara what?

      lollie sue - 2011-06-27 15:55

      hahaha wara wara tjo

      lollie sue - 2011-06-27 15:55

      hahaha wara wara tjo

      Schalk - 2011-06-27 16:41

      Biggest wara-wara: "We must also continue building hope in our country, and strengthen the ANC so that it can continue to play its role as the glue that holds South African society together." Wow Zuma, you have outdone yourself. This is right up there with the shower comment on the b*llsh*t-o-meter.

      Schalk - 2011-06-27 16:41

      Biggest wara-wara: "We must also continue building hope in our country, and strengthen the ANC so that it can continue to play its role as the glue that holds South African society together." Wow Zuma, you have outdone yourself. This is right up there with the shower comment on the b*llsh*t-o-meter.

      paulf - 2011-06-28 12:55

      Where there is smoke, there is fire. I do not trust nor believe the ANC.

      Alf - 2012-06-02 08:43

      Zuma quells landgrab fears! What is he going to do if it happens anyway -send in a non-existent army? We must ask ourselves the question - would we buy a secondhand car from the likes of Zuma?

  • jock - 2011-06-27 15:43

    I am glad you acknowledge that THe ANC is in a crisis.Now do something about it and maybe start by putting the ancyl in its place.

      Larro - 2011-06-28 04:55

      Jack - not gonna happen. You know the old joke:- Q:- how do you keep flies out of your kitchen? A:- put a bucket of sh1t in your lounge. The bucket of sh1t = ANCYL. The flies = attention of the press and right minded people The kitchen = ANC Ineptitude and coruption The ANC are MORE than happy to have the ANCYL take the focus off them!

      DonQuixote - 2011-06-28 10:31

      Until the ANC understands that running a government is analogous to running a business, they will forever remain incompetent in reaching their objectives. * Provide skill development and training for your employees = make sure those who are on the farms know how to farm. * Locate key policies within the business that restricts business growth and change them in line with the objective to make more money = locate key government policies (e.g. subsidising) that limit farms generating more profit for further growth and change them to make more money. * Fire the workers/managers that are not meeting up to performance and productivity targets and replace with more competent workers = get rid of the farmers that are relying more and more on government funds and external assistance to generate a profit, and give the farms to more competent people so that they can meet performance targets. etc.

      York Hunt - 2011-06-28 12:45

      @Larro. You are right there. The ANCYL is just there for mass distraction. Majority of people fall for it every time...

  • Oliver - 2011-06-27 15:43

    Wheres farm??? Which queue do I line up in to get one?

      Jacques Jones - 2011-06-27 16:18

      sorry bud from your profile pic i assume you are white? wrong skin colour.

      Jacques Jones - 2011-06-27 16:18

      sorry bud from your profile pic i assume you are white? wrong skin colour.

      anti crime - 2011-06-28 06:57

      ja mannn,jy is screwed lol

      Wired - 2011-06-28 10:55

      Yes, Mr zuma.. it seems you and julius really thought this one through.. There is 1,221,037 square kilometres of land in South Africa.. Take away (and im being modest) 1/3 of that land because of already built cities, highways, mountain ranges, and even a small freaking desert and we are left with about +/-800000 square kilometres left. Theres 49million people in south africa, not counting about 2million illegal brothers and sisters from the rest of africa. if we take a big knife and chop it all up equal, everyone in south africa gets a whole 16,3 square meteres of land. Now either people are going to have to use thier land and farm upwards towards the sky, or build skyscrapers for houses because you cant really fit much on 16 square meters of land... just a thought...

      CooP - 2011-06-28 20:10

      @Wired: Geez dude I'm sure your arithmetic is not correct. Surely it is 1.63 hectares per person. That's more than 6 hectares for a family of four - plenty of room to swing a cat.

  • Mnr. Smith - 2011-06-27 15:43

    Can we really believe an ANC President that dances and sings with the ANCYL President?? I think not.

      Grey B - 2011-06-27 15:52

      You say tamato and i say tomato. Watch this space!

      Grey B - 2011-06-27 15:52

      You say tamato and i say tomato. Watch this space!

      Intalladude Blogger - 2011-06-28 10:32

      Unbeleeeevable!! He says...More importantly we must prioritise the unity of all South African people black and white. And then He sang 'Mshini Wam', before leaving the podium. In my eyes...thats just pissing a certain group of poeple off...in no way is he unifying all South Africans when he spews out garbage like that.

  • willieman - 2011-06-27 15:46

    There he goes again,why did he say this in front of ANCYL.I will urge COSATU not to support second term for this man.Always not decisive on the fence because he wants to please every body.As one political comentator puts it "the man is not a leader is follower"

  • ???? - 2011-06-27 15:46

    If u look at all the left wing extremist filth trying to steal power within the ANC,Jacob Zuma actually looks like a very nice person

  • Sydney - 2011-06-27 15:46

    If you want to talk about land reform don’t talk with food in your mouth...

      kjac - 2011-06-27 15:50

      when gets the land, there will be no food. he's just gonna sit and stare at it

      kjac - 2011-06-27 15:50

      when gets the land, there will be no food. he's just gonna sit and stare at it

      Justfred - 2011-06-28 10:53

      Excellent comment! Just a pity so few people understand - only after the last tree has been cut down, only after the last river has been poisoned, only after the last fish has been eaten, only THEN will you realize that money can't be eaten!

      genet - 2011-06-29 10:03

      Excellent comment. So true, so true. Try to make them understand that.

  • gizzy - 2011-06-27 15:47

    There are thousands of acres of land, owned by government, that is unused. SELL it to those that want land. They need to learn and know that NOTHING in life is FREE!!!!

      Ogre - 2011-06-28 00:06

      It is not just the fact that government owns vast tracts of fertile land. At the end of 2009 the governmenthad spent a total of R28 billion to aquire 5% of the targeted land. At market related prices that would actually equate to 31% of the land that could have been bought, taking into account that the total value of land in private hands was valued at R85 billion. The R28 billion only represented 31% of the budget, and as far as I know the government is yet to answer where the ballabce of the allocated R93 billion was. The next point is that in 2010 an unofficial report that was circulated in government put the funds that had been misspent, misappropriated and fraudulently paid out at 20% of the annual procurement budget of R150 billion. That is R30 billion that could have been spent on land restitution or other projects to benifit the average voter.

  • Gorilla - 2011-06-27 15:48

    "We are in the process of finalising a green paper that will set a new trajectory for land reform in South Africa," he said. Quells fears? I don't think so.

  • George - 2011-06-27 15:49

    why does the ANC want to target land that has been developed and re-distribute it to the poor? why not give the poor vast hectares of empty land that government posses. Land usage is highly capital extensive and long term. How will the poor find money to invest long term in any redistributed land? Most crops only grow once per season, where will the cash flow come from for all the redundant months in between crops. We must move away from childish simplistic views on land reform. Government must instead root out corruption, invest heavily in education and scarce skills, encourage foreign investment by relaxing the draconian labour laws to stimulate employment, instead of buying billions worth of armaments when classrooms do not have books. Corruption and wastefull expenditure. I am black but this unfair targeting of white people is disgusting. ANC inherited an intact country from whites, instead they are running it to the ground. Apartheid SA despite its ugly head used to create jobs for all. ANC must build its own factories, cities etc and create jobs instead of targeting white people who do not even run the country. Look at Zimbabwe, and the refugee problem caused by land grabs and nationalisation. In the near future if we continue to be led by illiterate leaders, we will soon flock to Zim and Mozambique looking for jobs and food.

      MandlaSithole - 2011-06-27 16:00

      I second that. http://www.facebook.com/pages/Moeletsi-The-President/205134709529957

      MandlaSithole - 2011-06-27 16:00

      I second that. http://www.facebook.com/pages/Moeletsi-The-President/205134709529957

      MandlaSithole - 2011-06-27 16:01

      I second that. http://www.facebook.com/pages/Moeletsi-The-President/205134709529957

      MandlaSithole - 2011-06-27 16:01

      I second that. http://www.facebook.com/pages/Moeletsi-The-President/205134709529957

      Vee - 2011-06-27 16:03

      Because they want the farmhouse, implements and everything that goes with it. They think it stays in that condition forever. They know how to break it down but not how to maintain it. That's why they are called consumers.

      Vee - 2011-06-27 16:03

      Because they want the farmhouse, implements and everything that goes with it. They think it stays in that condition forever. They know how to break it down but not how to maintain it. That's why they are called consumers.

      Vee - 2011-06-27 16:09

      And I was talking about Malema's youth and those who don't know anything about economics or history.

      Vee - 2011-06-27 16:09

      And I was talking about Malema's youth and those who don't know anything about economics or history.

      My5cents - 2011-06-27 16:24

      @George in the midst of hysteria thank you for a balanced viewpoint. A solution which would benefit everyone. If you ran for politics you would get my vote.

      My5cents - 2011-06-27 16:24

      @George in the midst of hysteria thank you for a balanced viewpoint. A solution which would benefit everyone. If you ran for politics you would get my vote.

      THE.SRG - 2011-06-27 16:32

      so good to hear from the likes of intelligent guys like you for once.... there's more than enough black people like you in this country but we run buy the ignorant.i say give these two guys a seat in the government and get rid of the idiots.

      THE.SRG - 2011-06-27 16:32

      so good to hear from the likes of intelligent guys like you for once.... there's more than enough black people like you in this country but we run buy the ignorant.i say give these two guys a seat in the government and get rid of the idiots.

      theprodigy - 2011-06-27 16:44

      Georg I must say your post is a refreshing one, I hope you are black, what you say is 10000% correct, you get arrogant & racist people both black & white, but there is quite a bit of black racism & agression on these pages & its increasingly being fed by people like Malema, what we do know is that things must change, the wealth divide is a problem, land ownership also, but there is no silver bullet, things must be done carefully, but also as quickly as possible, there is lots of debate needed, we need to compromise, we need to be patient, we need strong leaders with the right motives. Unfortunately lots of time & money has been wasted since 1994. We cant waste any more of either, but we also cant let demogogues destroy our nation, we will all lose. Education is no.1, but at the same time so are jobs. Threatening millitancy, land grabs, nationalisation, anarchy, & govt. coups is NOT the way to go, job losses will happen, investment will dry up, we will be reduced to the lowest common dnomenator, just like Zim.

      theprodigy - 2011-06-27 16:44

      Georg I must say your post is a refreshing one, I hope you are black, what you say is 10000% correct, you get arrogant & racist people both black & white, but there is quite a bit of black racism & agression on these pages & its increasingly being fed by people like Malema, what we do know is that things must change, the wealth divide is a problem, land ownership also, but there is no silver bullet, things must be done carefully, but also as quickly as possible, there is lots of debate needed, we need to compromise, we need to be patient, we need strong leaders with the right motives. Unfortunately lots of time & money has been wasted since 1994. We cant waste any more of either, but we also cant let demogogues destroy our nation, we will all lose. Education is no.1, but at the same time so are jobs. Threatening millitancy, land grabs, nationalisation, anarchy, & govt. coups is NOT the way to go, job losses will happen, investment will dry up, we will be reduced to the lowest common dnomenator, just like Zim.

      cocopops - 2011-06-27 16:44

      By George!!!.....well summed up. Do me a favour email a letter based on these issues you mentioned directly to the State Presidents office. The man in the street sees these things but goverment is blind, they have no vision.

      cocopops - 2011-06-27 16:44

      By George!!!.....well summed up. Do me a favour email a letter based on these issues you mentioned directly to the State Presidents office. The man in the street sees these things but goverment is blind, they have no vision.

      louw.leroux2 - 2011-10-21 17:59

      GEORGE WITH SOMEONE like you we can walk the mile

  • Mundu - 2011-06-27 15:50

    Grabbing land will be a trigger for civil war.

      panafricanis - 2011-06-27 16:00

      then lets fight and get it over and done with...if thats the case

      panafricanis - 2011-06-27 16:00

      then lets fight and get it over and done with...if thats the case

      Smaal - 2011-06-27 16:15

      I’m with panafricanis on this one. Let’s start and get it over with.

      Smaal - 2011-06-27 16:15

      I’m with panafricanis on this one. Let’s start and get it over with.

      willieman - 2011-06-27 16:21

      Muntu the only way in my opinion is >Give land to black farmers and support them like the previous goverment did >Open agric colleges and train more african people in farming >Encourage the existing farmers to offer mentorship to the interested If we go a route of Zim SA will end up importing food from all over i.e all sorts of rubbish gonna land on our shores.Obviously my suggestion is along term solution.We need to be realistic lets look at those farms that were taken are they functional or not

      willieman - 2011-06-27 16:21

      Muntu the only way in my opinion is >Give land to black farmers and support them like the previous goverment did >Open agric colleges and train more african people in farming >Encourage the existing farmers to offer mentorship to the interested If we go a route of Zim SA will end up importing food from all over i.e all sorts of rubbish gonna land on our shores.Obviously my suggestion is along term solution.We need to be realistic lets look at those farms that were taken are they functional or not

      panafricanis - 2011-06-27 16:31

      Can somebody please give Willeman some bells...the man is taliking sense...

      panafricanis - 2011-06-27 16:31

      Can somebody please give Willeman some bells...the man is taliking sense...

      THE.SRG - 2011-06-27 16:36

      @pan whatever you wanna call yourself.....id love to fight you in the ring and smack that stupid head of yours....learn and listen to the 2 intelligent guys above and stop trying to get things for free you twat

      THE.SRG - 2011-06-27 16:36

      @pan whatever you wanna call yourself.....id love to fight you in the ring and smack that stupid head of yours....learn and listen to the 2 intelligent guys above and stop trying to get things for free you twat

      Sho Fukamachi - 2011-06-27 16:41

      Yes, I wouldn't mind killing some inbred black racists.

      Wayne - 2011-06-27 16:50

      @panafricanis - I would not think twice of killing you

      Wayne - 2011-06-27 16:50

      @panafricanis - I would not think twice of killing you

      White Oak - 2011-06-28 11:01

      Careful what you wish for, Pilgrim. Ever experienced real war? Fact is that South Africa is at the moment at a crossroads. There is the rough road and there is the smooth road. We, as the reasonable people of South Africa, both the black and white shades, can choose to co-exist with each other as we have done for the last four hundred odd years and as we have decided in 1994 or we can choose to go to war with each other. Fact is that the Afrikaners can take a lot, but sooner or later they also reach the “Gatvol” stage. Sooner or later even the strongest ox gets tired. When the Afrikaners are fed-up, they have never backed down when it comes to a fight for their existence and their place in the sun… and they have always produced a good account of themselves. Whether it was the Mighty Zulu Empire at Blood River, the Mighty British Empire in the Anglo-Boer War or the Mighty Communist Empire in Angola…one thing is for sure, you do not scratch the balls of a sleeping lion with a thorny twig. When he wakes, do not beg for mercy.

      daaivark - 2011-06-29 10:34

      @panafricanis and Smaal. We have no need for warmongers in our country, thank you. Please leave.

      daaivark - 2011-06-29 10:35

      @ Willieman. Now THERE is good sense! Truly.

      daaivark - 2011-06-29 10:36

      @ SRG. You may leave along with Smaal and panafricanis. Hey, you can share a boat! That should be fun.

  • Santapola - 2011-06-27 15:50

    Let them give me a piece our my land so that i can make my forefathers happy...Make it quick Zuma or else you out...We want the land..we want the land..the future president of the land have said so Mr Julius Malema

      Smaal - 2011-06-27 16:16

      I want land tooooooooooo!

      Smaal - 2011-06-27 16:16

      I want land tooooooooooo!

      willieman - 2011-06-27 16:28

      "make my forefathers happy"then what?

      willieman - 2011-06-27 16:28

      "make my forefathers happy"then what?

      Tony - 2011-06-27 16:35

      Please do not refer to Malema as Mr - that is a term that applies to a gentleman or someone of integrity. He has a big mouth and no desire to work towards a better future for the poor people. This is a vendetta for personal gain only.

      Tony - 2011-06-27 16:35

      Please do not refer to Malema as Mr - that is a term that applies to a gentleman or someone of integrity. He has a big mouth and no desire to work towards a better future for the poor people. This is a vendetta for personal gain only.

      THE.SRG - 2011-06-27 16:40

      hey santa...you supposed to give stuff out for free not take it....if you believe in free stuff then you prob believe in santaclause...father Christmas for president viva.

      THE.SRG - 2011-06-27 16:40

      hey santa...you supposed to give stuff out for free not take it....if you believe in free stuff then you prob believe in santaclause...father Christmas for president viva.

      amabok - 2011-06-28 10:36

      And what will you do with the land? You need money to cultivate (tractors, irrigation, labour) and Zuma/Malema have spent all your money on themselves. So now your land is fallow, you have no money and your family is hungry. Wake up, smell the coffee, get educated and get a job like the rest of us.

      AjaxFiko - 2011-06-28 11:55

      Santapola, you have suicidal thoughts and you have "that" tendency that is gonna sink this boat! We need less people such as yourself.

  • Kevin - 2011-06-27 15:51

    @panafric..anus...the brain is centrally distributed within the confines of your cranial casing...not in your butt!!! Try using it before you have a brainfart

  • Jubby - 2011-06-27 15:51

    Hence the fear that Julius Malema will be president. If one look at how much support Zuma had before he was president, and how much they thought he would do for South Africa. Look at him now, all his groups now turn their backs like COsatu and ANCYL, and they again want someone else to do what they want to do with RSA. Hence they want Malema, because they can see he WILL turn all of RSA on its head and give it all to the ANC

  • Mishka - 2011-06-27 15:51

    An African is - A native or inhabitant of Africa. A native is - Being such by birth or origin. So any person of any color born in Africa is an African. Why do so many people in South Africa believe that to be African you HAVE to be black?

      USSA - 2011-06-27 15:54

      My point above exactly. I was born here. I am an African without the benefit of a black skin. This is a non-negotiable fact. No matter which argument or debate tries to deny that.

      USSA - 2011-06-27 15:54

      My point above exactly. I was born here. I am an African without the benefit of a black skin. This is a non-negotiable fact. No matter which argument or debate tries to deny that.

      Mugabe - 2011-06-27 16:03

      there are wrong...all born in Africa or hold african citizenship is african....Land is not being taken away from the whites to Balcks, but from those who have it in excess and being given to all south africans (black & white) without, only that most of those who have are whites and those who don't are blacks

      Mugabe - 2011-06-27 16:03

      there are wrong...all born in Africa or hold african citizenship is african....Land is not being taken away from the whites to Balcks, but from those who have it in excess and being given to all south africans (black & white) without, only that most of those who have are whites and those who don't are blacks

      Mugabe - 2011-06-27 16:04

      there are wrong...all born in Africa or hold african citizenship is african....Land is not being taken away from the whites to Balcks, but from those who have it in excess and being given to all south africans (black & white) without, only that most of those who have are whites and those who don't are blacks

      Mugabe - 2011-06-27 16:04

      there are wrong...all born in Africa or hold african citizenship is african....Land is not being taken away from the whites to Balcks, but from those who have it in excess and being given to all south africans (black & white) without, only that most of those who have are whites and those who don't are blacks

      Grey B - 2011-06-27 16:04

      As a white African, I promise you, me and my forefathers have been in South Africa for more generations than most black South Africans have been. Can I now also put my name on a list for a farm?

      Grey B - 2011-06-27 16:04

      As a white African, I promise you, me and my forefathers have been in South Africa for more generations than most black South Africans have been. Can I now also put my name on a list for a farm?

      Nintendo - 2011-06-27 16:05

      im not going anywhere not that there's any place that will allow my lifestyle... im staying put and i'm an African!!! this country belongs to all who live in it whatever race Julius can jump up and down this is my home... f@%K him

      Nintendo - 2011-06-27 16:05

      im not going anywhere not that there's any place that will allow my lifestyle... im staying put and i'm an African!!! this country belongs to all who live in it whatever race Julius can jump up and down this is my home... f@%K him

      Heiku - 2011-06-27 16:15

      ^This. I feel exactly the same way Nintendo. Not taking sides but fact of the matter is I'm an African and this is where i belong.

      Heiku - 2011-06-27 16:15

      ^This. I feel exactly the same way Nintendo. Not taking sides but fact of the matter is I'm an African and this is where i belong.

      WatBang! - 2011-06-27 16:21

      Wise words from a wise lady.big applause to u.

      WatBang! - 2011-06-27 16:21

      Wise words from a wise lady.big applause to u.

      Mugabe - 2011-06-27 16:23

      @ Grey B...ofcoz yes...you will also be allocated land. you are 100% south african...land distribution is for all. those who are against it either posses ths vast lands or are the lazy city dwellers who no nothing abt farming and only worried abt the economy & themselves not the majority

      Mugabe - 2011-06-27 16:23

      @ Grey B...ofcoz yes...you will also be allocated land. you are 100% south african...land distribution is for all. those who are against it either posses ths vast lands or are the lazy city dwellers who no nothing abt farming and only worried abt the economy & themselves not the majority

      Dingiswayo - 2011-06-28 11:51

      ...being born in a stable does not make you a horse...

      Lanfear - 2011-11-09 10:13

      Agreed Mishka. If it were true that to be an African you have to be black, then most of north Africa shouldn't even be considered part of "Africa" and they are certainly not "Africans" then. Everyone who originated here, who was born here, etc. are Africans, no matter what their skin colour is.

  • Mugabe - 2011-06-27 15:51

    To Hell with this...Pambili with Malema...Land to the pple-no compensation....the days of compensating have elapsed, now we will grab our land back. VIVA MALEMA

      Matt - 2011-06-27 15:58

      p03s

      Matt - 2011-06-27 15:58

      p03s

      Tony - 2011-06-27 16:01

      And you will do what with the land? Answer this - big mouth please!!!

      Tony - 2011-06-27 16:01

      And you will do what with the land? Answer this - big mouth please!!!

      USSA - 2011-06-27 16:02

      We whities...we don't grab....we klap...don't forget that.

      USSA - 2011-06-27 16:02

      We whities...we don't grab....we klap...don't forget that.

      Tony - 2011-06-27 16:04

      What will you do with the land? Please give a rational answer and not just mouth off in the indigenous way!

      Tony - 2011-06-27 16:04

      What will you do with the land? Please give a rational answer and not just mouth off in the indigenous way!

      as.it.is - 2011-06-27 16:08

      as i've said before...i double dare you.

      as.it.is - 2011-06-27 16:08

      as i've said before...i double dare you.

      WatBang! - 2011-06-27 16:23

      Matt allow me to refrase.Mugabe jou ma se po3s and every1 that looks like u`s p03s.

      Mugabe - 2011-06-27 16:25

      farm...the problem with you pple u thnk Blacks can not farm. u have neva been to the rural areas thats why...the only reason why less yields come from this communal areas is bcoz the whites chased them to rocky non fertile lands that are difficult to farm...

      Mugabe - 2011-06-27 16:25

      farm...the problem with you pple u thnk Blacks can not farm. u have neva been to the rural areas thats why...the only reason why less yields come from this communal areas is bcoz the whites chased them to rocky non fertile lands that are difficult to farm...

      THE.SRG - 2011-06-27 16:44

      go live in mugabes country chop

      THE.SRG - 2011-06-27 16:44

      go live in mugabes country chop

      Gail - 2011-06-27 16:45

      Thats all you people can do...STEAL, how about working and PAYING for what you want??

      Gail - 2011-06-27 16:45

      Thats all you people can do...STEAL, how about working and PAYING for what you want??

      theprodigy - 2011-06-27 16:47

      haha, did you not get enought protein when you were growing up. Your brain has elapsed.

      theprodigy - 2011-06-27 16:47

      haha, did you not get enought protein when you were growing up. Your brain has elapsed.

      Mugabe - 2011-06-27 16:48

      well if you call repossession stealing then yah u are really insane

      Mugabe - 2011-06-27 16:48

      well if you call repossession stealing then yah u are really insane

      Bidartbru - 2011-06-27 17:00

      Mugobby, Firstly, I would like to say that you are a miserable s**t bucket! Secondly, if you had any farming tools you would be killing each other with them.

      Bidartbru - 2011-06-27 17:00

      Mugobby, Firstly, I would like to say that you are a miserable s**t bucket! Secondly, if you had any farming tools you would be killing each other with them.

      mvikeli - 2011-06-28 15:50

      Instead of mouthing off (and I mean everyone, not just Mugabe) can people maybe help me understand why they believe for example, that if they had any farming tools they would killing each other with them?

      daaivark - 2011-06-29 10:39

      @ Tony. What? Like White Oak and his mates?

      Airborne68 - 2011-06-29 14:29

      Mugabe, how can you call it repossessing when you never owned it in the first place?

      superbob21 - 2011-07-02 20:38

      he's a chop, dont encourage him. the fact that he uses "mugabe" as his name should be self explanatory.

  • Matt - 2011-06-27 15:59

    So offer the farmers the market value and then you will have a lot more willing sellers

      Matt - 2011-06-27 16:00

      Say you have a farm worth R5-million. The government offers you R1-million. What do you do? Use that money to buy a house in the city? Then you have to apply for a job, and what well-paying job will a life-long farmer get?

      Matt - 2011-06-27 16:00

      Say you have a farm worth R5-million. The government offers you R1-million. What do you do? Use that money to buy a house in the city? Then you have to apply for a job, and what well-paying job will a life-long farmer get?

      Matt - 2011-06-27 16:02

      Say you have a farm worth R5-million. The government offers you R1-million. What do you do? Use that money to buy a house in the city? Then you have to apply for a job, and what well-paying job will a life-long farmer get?

      Matt - 2011-06-27 16:02

      Say you have a farm worth R5-million. The government offers you R1-million. What do you do? Use that money to buy a house in the city? Then you have to apply for a job, and what well-paying job will a life-long farmer get?

  • Brian van Rensburg - 2011-06-27 16:00

    CAN WE TAKE BACK WHAT THE BANK HAS TAKEN FROM US?AND IS IT WHAT THE BIBLE WANTS US TO DO TAKE AND TAKE .

      daaivark - 2011-06-29 10:39

      What the hell has the bible got to do with this?

  • TL - 2011-06-27 16:03

    ideas24.co.za

      realist03 - 2011-06-27 17:42

      This is an article that was posted in the Framers Weekly (5/11/2008) by Peter Mashala Who is entitled to what land? THE HISTORY OF LAND-ownership in South Africa once came before the International Court of Justice. From 1960 to 1966, Ethiopia and Liberia had fought a fierce legal campaign against South Africa in the World Court at The ...Hague, to put South West Africa under the guardianship of the United Nations. They alleged that “South Africa was already effectively occupied by non-whites before Europeans began to settle in the country and the Europeans proceeded to take occupation of non-white land.” By using the works of well-known historians, doctoral theses and archives, the South African legal team refuted these allegations effectively and Ethiopia and Liberia eventually accepted South Africa’s version of the history of landownership. South Africa, referring to the occupation by black tribes up until 1652 maintained that: “Although no exact calculation is possible, it would appear that all the areas inhabited by the Bantu tribes comprised approximately one-eighth of the total area of South Africa including the protectorates.”

      realist03 - 2011-06-27 17:42

      This is an article that was posted in the Framers Weekly (5/11/2008) by Peter Mashala Who is entitled to what land? THE HISTORY OF LAND-ownership in South Africa once came before the International Court of Justice. From 1960 to 1966, Ethiopia and Liberia had fought a fierce legal campaign against South Africa in the World Court at The ...Hague, to put South West Africa under the guardianship of the United Nations. They alleged that “South Africa was already effectively occupied by non-whites before Europeans began to settle in the country and the Europeans proceeded to take occupation of non-white land.” By using the works of well-known historians, doctoral theses and archives, the South African legal team refuted these allegations effectively and Ethiopia and Liberia eventually accepted South Africa’s version of the history of landownership. South Africa, referring to the occupation by black tribes up until 1652 maintained that: “Although no exact calculation is possible, it would appear that all the areas inhabited by the Bantu tribes comprised approximately one-eighth of the total area of South Africa including the protectorates.”

      realist03 - 2011-06-27 17:42

      New settlers were black and white In fact, the whole country had actually belonged to the San and the Nama or Khoikhoin for centuries (Khoisan is the collective name for these two groups). They were equally “non-black” and “non-white”. Over a long time, Bantu-speaking nations migrated from central Africa southwards and the Khoisan communities were driven away, exterminated and absorbed. From 1652, Van Riebeeck and his successors also fought the remaining Khoisan communities in the south and decimated their numbers. In addition, diseases overwhelmed the original nomadic occupants of South Africa. So, in effect, both black and white were actually colonialists and new settlers. Occupation patterns Now let’s examine the occupation patterns of these new settlers. South Africa covers an area of 1 219 090km². Historically, not a single Zulu, Tswana, Basotho, Pedi or Swazi resided in the Western Cape and few Xhosas were to be found in the northeastern region. The Western Cape has a surface area of 129 386km², which is 10,6% of South Africa. In the Northern Cape, no Zulu, Xhosa, Basotho, Pedi or Swazi was to be found and very few Tswanas. The province covers 361 830km² or 29,7% of South Africa.

      realist03 - 2011-06-27 17:42

      New settlers were black and white In fact, the whole country had actually belonged to the San and the Nama or Khoikhoin for centuries (Khoisan is the collective name for these two groups). They were equally “non-black” and “non-white”. Over a long time, Bantu-speaking nations migrated from central Africa southwards and the Khoisan communities were driven away, exterminated and absorbed. From 1652, Van Riebeeck and his successors also fought the remaining Khoisan communities in the south and decimated their numbers. In addition, diseases overwhelmed the original nomadic occupants of South Africa. So, in effect, both black and white were actually colonialists and new settlers. Occupation patterns Now let’s examine the occupation patterns of these new settlers. South Africa covers an area of 1 219 090km². Historically, not a single Zulu, Tswana, Basotho, Pedi or Swazi resided in the Western Cape and few Xhosas were to be found in the northeastern region. The Western Cape has a surface area of 129 386km², which is 10,6% of South Africa. In the Northern Cape, no Zulu, Xhosa, Basotho, Pedi or Swazi was to be found and very few Tswanas. The province covers 361 830km² or 29,7% of South Africa.

      realist03 - 2011-06-27 17:43

      What all this ultimately means is that black tribes did not have historical residence in 40% of the country and our borders are not even a century old. Regarding the other 60%, we are faced with contradictions. The Voortrekkers occupied areas where, at the time of the Great Trek, there were no settled black communities. The Free State and Transvaal were largely uninhabited back then, especially in the aftermath of the Mfecane genocide which was launched by black tribes against other black tribes. These two Boer republics were under threat from England and not from black tribes. In fact, there were several agreements made with black chiefs to recognise borders and promote good neighbourly relations. But in Natal and the Eastern Cape, things were different. There Britain ruled. At the time, the Boers of the two republics and the Colony of the Cape of Good Hope occupied 60% of South Africa. Historically, the Tswana, Basotho, Pedi, Swazi, Shangana, Tsonga and Venda did not occupy more than 40% of the land in these provinces, that is 15,3% of the whole country. And even if they had occupied 60% , it would have only been 22,9% of the whole country.

      realist03 - 2011-06-27 17:43

      What all this ultimately means is that black tribes did not have historical residence in 40% of the country and our borders are not even a century old. Regarding the other 60%, we are faced with contradictions. The Voortrekkers occupied areas where, at the time of the Great Trek, there were no settled black communities. The Free State and Transvaal were largely uninhabited back then, especially in the aftermath of the Mfecane genocide which was launched by black tribes against other black tribes. These two Boer republics were under threat from England and not from black tribes. In fact, there were several agreements made with black chiefs to recognise borders and promote good neighbourly relations. But in Natal and the Eastern Cape, things were different. There Britain ruled. At the time, the Boers of the two republics and the Colony of the Cape of Good Hope occupied 60% of South Africa. Historically, the Tswana, Basotho, Pedi, Swazi, Shangana, Tsonga and Venda did not occupy more than 40% of the land in these provinces, that is 15,3% of the whole country. And even if they had occupied 60% , it would have only been 22,9% of the whole country.

      realist03 - 2011-06-27 17:43

      If the colonial powers hadn’t carved Africa into pieces, the Tswana of North West and the Tswana of Botswana would have occupied one huge country. KwaZulu-Natal comprises 7,6% of South Africa. If we were to accept that the Zulus can claim 85% of this area, it’s still a mere 6,5% of South Africa. The Eastern Cape comprises 13,9% of the country. If we accept that the Xhosa can lay claim to 85% of it, this amounts to 11,8% of the country. So from a historical perspective, this leaves us with 15,3% + 6,5% + 11,8% = 33,6%. Or 22,9% + 6,5% + 11,8% = 41,2%. And what percentage of the best agricultural land is occupied by blacks today, including their traditional tribal land? Obviously much more than 41,2%. It’s easy to deny historical facts, but these facts can’t be erased. The relevance of history A serious oversight in the negotiations of 1990 to 1994 between the National Party government and the ANC was that we didn’t discuss our history. We were caught up in the necessity of creating a constitution which would form the foundation for the continuation of government. The burning issues that were part of our country’s history weren’t discussed and expounded frankly. Mostly we negotiated like enemies forced into a ceasefire because we’d realised that if we were to continue shooting, only a mess would remain over which to govern. There are many reasons to wake up our educational authorities and urge them to compile curricula which will portray the past in a balanced manner.

      realist03 - 2011-06-27 17:43

      If the colonial powers hadn’t carved Africa into pieces, the Tswana of North West and the Tswana of Botswana would have occupied one huge country. KwaZulu-Natal comprises 7,6% of South Africa. If we were to accept that the Zulus can claim 85% of this area, it’s still a mere 6,5% of South Africa. The Eastern Cape comprises 13,9% of the country. If we accept that the Xhosa can lay claim to 85% of it, this amounts to 11,8% of the country. So from a historical perspective, this leaves us with 15,3% + 6,5% + 11,8% = 33,6%. Or 22,9% + 6,5% + 11,8% = 41,2%. And what percentage of the best agricultural land is occupied by blacks today, including their traditional tribal land? Obviously much more than 41,2%. It’s easy to deny historical facts, but these facts can’t be erased. The relevance of history A serious oversight in the negotiations of 1990 to 1994 between the National Party government and the ANC was that we didn’t discuss our history. We were caught up in the necessity of creating a constitution which would form the foundation for the continuation of government. The burning issues that were part of our country’s history weren’t discussed and expounded frankly. Mostly we negotiated like enemies forced into a ceasefire because we’d realised that if we were to continue shooting, only a mess would remain over which to govern. There are many reasons to wake up our educational authorities and urge them to compile curricula which will portray the past in a balanced manner.

      realist03 - 2011-06-27 17:43

      A gripping account of all of the main events among black nations from about 1800 can be found in the book Stamme en Ryke by JS Bergh and AP Bergh and should be a prescribed work for all history students. A new legacy of hope The “white superiority and black inferiority” approach was applied politically, socially and economically by colonial powers for more than a century resulting in South African citizens having forefathers with a history of war, genocide and oppression. The end of the war in Angola in 1988 and the election in Namibia in 1989 were pivotal, opening the way for Mandela’s release, which was the final watershed in South Africa’s centuries-long history of struggle and oppression. Tribal land and expropriation A very important, often-overlooked aspect of land reform applies to the vast areas occupied by traditional tribes. Whites, coloureds and Indians don’t have such tribal areas, compared to millions of blacks who enjoy privileges in theirs such as being exempt from taxes.

      realist03 - 2011-06-27 17:43

      A gripping account of all of the main events among black nations from about 1800 can be found in the book Stamme en Ryke by JS Bergh and AP Bergh and should be a prescribed work for all history students. A new legacy of hope The “white superiority and black inferiority” approach was applied politically, socially and economically by colonial powers for more than a century resulting in South African citizens having forefathers with a history of war, genocide and oppression. The end of the war in Angola in 1988 and the election in Namibia in 1989 were pivotal, opening the way for Mandela’s release, which was the final watershed in South Africa’s centuries-long history of struggle and oppression. Tribal land and expropriation A very important, often-overlooked aspect of land reform applies to the vast areas occupied by traditional tribes. Whites, coloureds and Indians don’t have such tribal areas, compared to millions of blacks who enjoy privileges in theirs such as being exempt from taxes.

      realist03 - 2011-06-27 17:44

      Questions which remain unanswered, are: what is the yield/ha in the tribal areas? How many employment opportunities are created there? What do the income tax proceeds amount to? Is land tax levied there? What are the expenses in terms of education and health care? Who pays these expenses? Who are the beneficiaries? Can agricultural units be surveyed and allocated to skilled black farmers, who’ll be able to use them as security to obtain capital for agricultural activities? In terms of the proposed expropriation legislation, will it be possible to expropriate tribal land in the public interest and how will its value be determined? Percentage claims (or the quota occupancy) must also be subject to a proper analysis of, for example, rainfall, pasture carrying capacity, arability, distance from markets, etc. It could happen that residents of the Knersvlakte are prepared to swop 10ha or more of their land for 1ha in the East Coast area. The Eastern Cape comprises 169 580km² and the Northern Cape 361 830km². The advocates of quotas regard our country as uniformly arable. What would they say if the people of the Northern Cape were to ask to swop half of their province for the Eastern Cape? They would immediately reject the idea based on the different arability of the land and of course, their cultural-historical attachment to their areas.

      realist03 - 2011-06-27 17:44

      Questions which remain unanswered, are: what is the yield/ha in the tribal areas? How many employment opportunities are created there? What do the income tax proceeds amount to? Is land tax levied there? What are the expenses in terms of education and health care? Who pays these expenses? Who are the beneficiaries? Can agricultural units be surveyed and allocated to skilled black farmers, who’ll be able to use them as security to obtain capital for agricultural activities? In terms of the proposed expropriation legislation, will it be possible to expropriate tribal land in the public interest and how will its value be determined? Percentage claims (or the quota occupancy) must also be subject to a proper analysis of, for example, rainfall, pasture carrying capacity, arability, distance from markets, etc. It could happen that residents of the Knersvlakte are prepared to swop 10ha or more of their land for 1ha in the East Coast area. The Eastern Cape comprises 169 580km² and the Northern Cape 361 830km². The advocates of quotas regard our country as uniformly arable. What would they say if the people of the Northern Cape were to ask to swop half of their province for the Eastern Cape? They would immediately reject the idea based on the different arability of the land and of course, their cultural-historical attachment to their areas.

      realist03 - 2011-06-27 17:44

      Policy criticisms and learning from the past A new constitutional dispensation would not have come about in South Africa if the ANC had demanded that the stipulations of the Employment Equity Act, and especially the manner in which it’s currently being applied, to be part of the constitution. Ironically, the National Party government would have been able to rely on the support of the International Labour Organisation. Neither the National Party government nor the ANC would have wanted to govern this country if there had been a civil war. Therefore, and because we regretted the injustices of apartheid deeply, we took steps in our negotiations to remedy the disadvantages it had caused. However, we did not agree that the injustices of the past could be compensated for by creating injustices in the present. In terms of the constitution, positive remediation can be brought about by promoting the welfare of the disadvantaged in all walks of life via education, land reform, health care, housing, job creation, skills training and economic participation. Have the central, provincial and local authorities empowered to do this been successful? As in the past, they have been driven by a fatal obsession – for the National Party it was apartheid; for the ANC it’s quota madness based on demographic racial representation. Black empowerment requires quotas and affirmative action requires that a substantial number of the disadvantaged must benefit from rectification.

      realist03 - 2011-06-27 17:44

      Policy criticisms and learning from the past A new constitutional dispensation would not have come about in South Africa if the ANC had demanded that the stipulations of the Employment Equity Act, and especially the manner in which it’s currently being applied, to be part of the constitution. Ironically, the National Party government would have been able to rely on the support of the International Labour Organisation. Neither the National Party government nor the ANC would have wanted to govern this country if there had been a civil war. Therefore, and because we regretted the injustices of apartheid deeply, we took steps in our negotiations to remedy the disadvantages it had caused. However, we did not agree that the injustices of the past could be compensated for by creating injustices in the present. In terms of the constitution, positive remediation can be brought about by promoting the welfare of the disadvantaged in all walks of life via education, land reform, health care, housing, job creation, skills training and economic participation. Have the central, provincial and local authorities empowered to do this been successful? As in the past, they have been driven by a fatal obsession – for the National Party it was apartheid; for the ANC it’s quota madness based on demographic racial representation. Black empowerment requires quotas and affirmative action requires that a substantial number of the disadvantaged must benefit from rectification.

      realist03 - 2011-06-27 17:44

      We acknowledge that the ANC inherited a lot of misery from the past, but they also inherited the most advanced infrastructure in Africa. Land reform White farmers aren’t opposed to this country having more black farmers, but it’s imperative to ensure that they have the necessary skills and capital and that their farms don’t end up being sold, rented, unproductive or squatter camps. The decisive point in our negotiations of 1990 to 1994 was when we jointly realised that we needed each other to bring about prosperity for all of our people. And just as in the case of affirmative action, white and black need each other to conclude land reform successfully. A country which can’t feed its own population faces serious problems. The proposed Expropriation Bill is unconstitutional and instead of contributing to the welfare of black South Africans, blacks will eventually pay the highest price. Zimbabwe is a tragic example of this. Within ANC ranks voices have been heard saying, “We can’t all be Mandelas.” We can, however, all emulate Mandela’s legacy of reconciliation, tolerance, equal opportunities for all and the upliftment of the poor in a fair and effective manner. I am convinced that blacks will agree that we need each other to ensure that black farmers become successful. It’s also in the interest of white farmers, because then we can feed our people together

      realist03 - 2011-06-27 17:44

      We acknowledge that the ANC inherited a lot of misery from the past, but they also inherited the most advanced infrastructure in Africa. Land reform White farmers aren’t opposed to this country having more black farmers, but it’s imperative to ensure that they have the necessary skills and capital and that their farms don’t end up being sold, rented, unproductive or squatter camps. The decisive point in our negotiations of 1990 to 1994 was when we jointly realised that we needed each other to bring about prosperity for all of our people. And just as in the case of affirmative action, white and black need each other to conclude land reform successfully. A country which can’t feed its own population faces serious problems. The proposed Expropriation Bill is unconstitutional and instead of contributing to the welfare of black South Africans, blacks will eventually pay the highest price. Zimbabwe is a tragic example of this. Within ANC ranks voices have been heard saying, “We can’t all be Mandelas.” We can, however, all emulate Mandela’s legacy of reconciliation, tolerance, equal opportunities for all and the upliftment of the poor in a fair and effective manner. I am convinced that blacks will agree that we need each other to ensure that black farmers become successful. It’s also in the interest of white farmers, because then we can feed our people together

      Kameomaua - 2011-06-28 22:57

      @realist03 Thank you very much for such an informative posting. I wish I could download it and keep it. I so hope and pray that the goodwill and reasonableness with which the negotiations were made in the run-up to 1994 will eventually prevail. Compromises must have been made. That's unavoidable. But if only the people in power (whether political or economical) would start caring more for the common good than their own personal comfort, this country could be pretty close to 'heaven on earth'. I thank you for the time it must have taken you to write up all this and hope more people will read it with a balanced attitude.

  • FrankLee - 2011-06-27 16:06

    The earth is the Lord's, and all that is in it. No one person or clan or nation can lay claim to any land whatsoever. It all belongs to the one who created it in the first place. Eventually it will be burned like in a furnace and destroyed to rid it of the sin of mankind.

      cocopops - 2011-06-27 16:34

      You echo my sentiments, selfish mankind should be more selfless then maybe the problems will be resolved. Mankind has fought so may wars over land which he thinks belongs to him, what is happening now has happened before, one vicious cycle....the blacks will take the land from the white farmers, further down the track there will be a new government and the land will again be repossessed and handed out to others. Makes me dizzy!!!!

      cocopops - 2011-06-27 16:34

      You echo my sentiments, selfish mankind should be more selfless then maybe the problems will be resolved. Mankind has fought so may wars over land which he thinks belongs to him, what is happening now has happened before, one vicious cycle....the blacks will take the land from the white farmers, further down the track there will be a new government and the land will again be repossessed and handed out to others. Makes me dizzy!!!!

      daaivark - 2011-06-29 10:42

      Well, the Lord is doing sweet fanny to resolve this thorny issue. According to your silly argument, you cannot claim ownership of your house, your yard, the trees in your yard. Why make everything God's problem? Try and do one or two things for yourself. He'd/She'd probably really thank you for giving him/her a break.

  • Phaedioux - 2011-06-27 16:09

    State and public land going out on leasehold is a very good idea, providing that the lessee can afford it and pays regularly. It is presumed that the intended leases are long term (i.e. 99 years or so) so that a few generations of a family will be able to develop it sufficiently (if the land is for agricultural purposes), or that the lease can be sold/transferred if it is no longer required. I sincerely hope that this is not going to be AA based? No doubt the 'green paper' will clarify these issues.

  • TL - 2011-06-27 16:12

    ideas24.co.za

  • john - 2011-06-27 16:14

    It's not just that the transfer is happening "slowly". The more worrying aspect is that the land that has been transferred is not being put to use. By the Dept of Agric's own admission, only something like 1% of transferred farms continue to be viable concerns. The rest have fallen into barren non-production. Although I can understand why neither the ANC nor the ANCYL wants to draw attention to this fact.

  • Azwimpheleli - 2011-06-27 16:18

    Mr President, This song Mshini Wam does not mean anything to us. We need proper leadership in this state. This is not time to sing, is a time of delivery what you promise the masses. The Land redistribution comes with skills. You know Mr President even yourself would never use the land profitable and create jobs. If you need to approach land redistribution where are skills in this country, we are producing worse students ever from our high school. Please let’s address critical issues skills, create jobs, service delivery and corruption. Why no one in movement ever stand discuss corruption where is Juju here the hero? Corruption it has become very sensitive issue. Please do not take this state backwards. Former President Thabo Mbeki he had vision then what is your vision Mr President?

  • shatzi - 2011-06-27 16:23

    @panafricanis - All you people will do with land if you get your grubby little paws on it is turn it into a desert,you lot are a nation of destroyers,you have achieved nothing in the last five centuries,your idea of farming is a goat a cow and three mielies,rather go hang yourself before you destroy anything else

  • Sense - 2011-06-27 16:24

    I am so SICK of this! Zuma this... Malema that... An endless, meaningless battle between these low-wits. Here's an idea: drop this nonsense and start making some plans!! Plans to feed the hungry masses! Build schools! Build the economy! Educate people... Hell, educate yourselves first. Just stop this pointless low-level debate and blame shifting!!

      Mugabe - 2011-06-27 16:27

      the ground must be level 1st

      Mugabe - 2011-06-27 16:27

      the ground must be level 1st

      daaivark - 2011-06-29 10:43

      What ground is ever level? Don't be ridiculous.

  • Vee - 2011-06-27 16:25

    http://nolstuijt.wordpress.com/2011/06/27/who-does-the-land-belong-to/

  • Humang - 2011-06-27 16:27

    the world will never allow you people to destroy South Africa the land that we built as you have destroyed the rest of Africa. Besdies black people are not from South Africa-they come from the middle of Africa

      daaivark - 2011-06-29 10:44

      According to what discredited histories?

  • CraigColinRoyMcLeod - 2011-06-27 16:28

    Well food security was destroyed already. 70% of SA productivity died with willing buyer willing seller. Which was not so willing I might add, I was present when farmers were told accept the 2 million offer for 21 million in farm and equipment or we will take it from you.

  • 300katoom - 2011-06-27 16:29

    Back in the 70`s when are property was going to be taken back in Tanzania we had no choice but to leave, but before we did we bulldozed the house, out house and other buildings down destroyed are water pump from the river, why because we built it not them why should they get are hard earned property in one piece, I went back there in 93 to have a look, and it all over grown forest has taken over

  • tightrope - 2011-06-27 16:29

    The Bible says Pray for the Goverment,does,nt matter how wrong they are, we are to pray for them,maybe that is the problem in South Africa we have forgotten to pray for the Goverment- you want to see wonders happen, pray pray and pray until God moves or removes

      THE.SRG - 2011-06-27 17:29

      oh my word...what a great plan!...lets just pray....do something constructive idiot...im not against the bible or god but when some says all we need to do is pray then i just feel sorry.if you wanna see wonders spend your time doing!

      THE.SRG - 2011-06-27 17:29

      oh my word...what a great plan!...lets just pray....do something constructive idiot...im not against the bible or god but when some says all we need to do is pray then i just feel sorry.if you wanna see wonders spend your time doing!

      THE.SRG - 2011-06-27 18:11

      you and malema are on opposite spectrum's...malema is way to aggressive in trying to get to his target and you are way to passive...least malema is doing something to get what he wants..."DOING"....even though i hate the chop....we need less people saying pray and more assertive people "DOING" against this fat puppy prick.if we had boys doing the same as he's doing mabe we would also have some media time but every ones too scared of it....we need leadership not priests and nuns...go thump your bible where it will do some good

      THE.SRG - 2011-06-27 18:11

      you and malema are on opposite spectrum's...malema is way to aggressive in trying to get to his target and you are way to passive...least malema is doing something to get what he wants..."DOING"....even though i hate the chop....we need less people saying pray and more assertive people "DOING" against this fat puppy prick.if we had boys doing the same as he's doing mabe we would also have some media time but every ones too scared of it....we need leadership not priests and nuns...go thump your bible where it will do some good

  • be200 - 2011-06-27 16:39

    Give the black man the land and lets sit back and see them stave! To all my black friends any reason way this will work? Talk is cheap pap on the tabel talks! No farms no pap!!!!!!!!!! Will brother Malema feed you all,where will you go when this fails ZIM Nigeria???????

  • ktheron2 - 2011-06-27 16:41

    Panafricanis, all you and your kind want to do is get back at the white man. You have absolutely no intention of using the land productively, and will rather see everybody equally poor than a rich minority. Tomorrow means nothing to you. Such is the way of Africa where logic and common sense are in very short supply.

  • shane.jacoby - 2011-06-27 16:42

    @panafricanis & @mugabe: Please answer me this... I'm a white South African, born of this soil! I grew up in a childrenshome (disadvantaged), and I own only the belongings I bought since I started my working life. (Car, TV, etc...) So what happens if I buy a house from a black African man? Would this be considered fair? Just another question: I'm born from this soil, pay my taxes, abide by the laws and will go to war for my country. Am I not African despite my skin color?

  • herman.booysen2 - 2011-06-27 16:43

    The bigger problem is the mentality, to be able to get wealth you have to work for it. By just getting land because our forefathers had some, is not sustainable. Another misconception is that black south-africans owned the land before the europeans came, most of the land that were transfered then were bought by means of cattle. The minority of land were land that was taken by the apartheid goverment, these are correct me if I'm worng 95% settled. Therefore the redistribution of land is fed out of greed and the mantatily of "Bak Handjie". Even in the apartheid erra if farmers did not work hard they lost their land purely out of economic reasons. Please just spend some more time with history books and you'll see a diffrent story !

      Sting3r - 2011-06-27 17:09

      The majority and their leaders will never work for what they want, it's their mentality and in their gene's to: 1. THREATEN, 2. TAKE 3. VANDALISE and then, finally 4. WAIT FOR SOMEONE TO COME FIX...

      Sting3r - 2011-06-27 17:09

      The majority and their leaders will never work for what they want, it's their mentality and in their gene's to: 1. THREATEN, 2. TAKE 3. VANDALISE and then, finally 4. WAIT FOR SOMEONE TO COME FIX...

  • Daniel - 2011-06-27 16:46

    Panafricanis, let me teach you how to count in chinese: one----watta two----poe three----siam Now say after me........watta poe siam !!

      daaivark - 2011-06-29 10:45

      OK, and now from outside the creche?

  • Sting3r - 2011-06-27 17:03

    All the ANC & Malema followers are too thick to grasp the fact that they have been conned by their own, and now that the ruling party is under pressure, they come up with these idiotic resolutions to keep the lazy majority in check for the next election...They will NEVER take my land, I pity them, idiots!!

  • ZumaGabe - 2011-06-27 18:08

    When you have incomprehensible lazy, incompetent and corrupt cadres trying to play at "negotiation, negotiation" for land deals with professional deal negotiators the lust for changing the rules to fit your own stupidity will be there. There is nothing wrong with willing seller willing buyer - rather look at the retards trying to play a first world game of dealing in property. Die arme po3pholle word om elke hoek en draai getrump.

  • Kwatsha - 2011-06-27 18:36

    @abbyscinclair Learn to spell you dumb pollock! Showing off that fine boer education no doubt. You would be wise to educate yourself. To the rest of you haters- you would be wise to refrain from such bellicose talk and TEACH the masses the farming skills/other skills you ridicule them for not having. Because if it gets to the point of explosion and the Blacks revolt- then NO ONE will get anything. Now whose life will be changed more? yours or theirs? We must have a real land distribution/housing plan that everyone can support. Amandla.

      THE.SRG - 2011-06-27 19:01

      why must we teach the ones that wanna kill us and take the land....they can teach themselves...ffs im sick of you putting the blame on us!....tell your pres to teach...tell malema to teach...why should we do any more for you,very tiered of you demanding us to do things when the government wont...get stuffed and do it yourself

      THE.SRG - 2011-06-27 19:01

      why must we teach the ones that wanna kill us and take the land....they can teach themselves...ffs im sick of you putting the blame on us!....tell your pres to teach...tell malema to teach...why should we do any more for you,very tiered of you demanding us to do things when the government wont...get stuffed and do it yourself

  • bj - 2011-06-27 18:55

    To the troll and all his trollies I Am white and I own what I own because I paid for it - with hard work. I paid my taxes and those taxes paid for your house and the roads and all else that makes your life so comfotable and modern. Electricity and water and roads, etc. So I'm a nice guy. So bite me. You try to steal anything of mine or my neighbour, you will get what is due to you. It is fast and small and I have many of them. And yes, they hurt a lot. You have a nice life now - with my money.

  • Zama.mncwabe - 2011-06-27 19:06

    Not all blacks wants your land...so please behave white people...

      THE.SRG - 2011-06-27 19:22

      i agree with you...so pls dont vote anc,as you can see in some posts above is all we want is intelligent people running this place,be it white or black i dont care.we just need clever guys doing the job!

      THE.SRG - 2011-06-27 19:22

      i agree with you...so pls dont vote anc,as you can see in some posts above is all we want is intelligent people running this place,be it white or black i dont care.we just need clever guys doing the job!

      THE.SRG - 2011-06-27 19:26

      id rather see Goerge in malemas place any day...he is black and im proud to say a true SA boy....we need more like him.get rid of the malemas and bring clever guys in.Be it white or black,i dont care

      THE.SRG - 2011-06-27 19:26

      id rather see Goerge in malemas place any day...he is black and im proud to say a true SA boy....we need more like him.get rid of the malemas and bring clever guys in.Be it white or black,i dont care

      daaivark - 2011-06-29 10:47

      SRG, If it's intelligent people you want, judging from the stunning erudition displayed in your comments, you had better not offer your help.

  • Mubashir - 2011-06-27 19:08

    If ANC gets the two thirds majority they will change the constitution to 'legally' take the land without compensation. It is imperative that ANC does not get two thirds next year. http://www.hotpaknews.com

  • diplomat - 2011-06-27 19:30

    panafricanis sadly for you, that is not going to happen! These so called Europeans have been there for 300 years and more, and we belong there, just like you or like the Americans in America. So read up a little on history, maybe take a course in something to educate yourself, you know this is a global world now, watching every move the goverments are doing allover the world. Well, and if goverments do land grabs etc, no one invest! The result then is poverty! That you will find when you read up a little. I still believe, education is the key! for YOU and others like you.

      Monica - 2011-06-28 00:11

      It is time to get a proper youth president that promotes education and health for children; not stealing mines; banks and land from people. The black people have also had land; they just did not know what to do with it and they still do not know! They only want land where people have worked hard and made a living from it. Crazy idiots running this country!

  • Chibuli - 2011-06-27 20:10

    Listen up, all you racist idiots... my land is MY land! I bought it from a Black man - it was not stolen from your ancestors. When did YOU own any land that was stolen from you by a White man? Prove that it was STOLEN from YOU, and I will support your cause. Africa belongs to Africans - Black, White and any shade in between. And if you don't like it - get out, no matter what your ethnicity. I'm tired of racism - black or white - and it's time you grow up and acknowledge that African means from Africa...NOT Black!

  • bj - 2011-06-27 20:11

    Daniel Thanks for the laugh Think he understands? lol

  • Monica - 2011-06-27 20:14

    I think you should first go and check the land that belongs to the Municipalities and Government and see what has happened to it. Yesterday it was reported that a 50 million rand golf course has been run on government land. Develop the land that you already have. Why take the livelyhood away from people that have worked hard for their money. ANC just want to steal and grab; smash and grab; get rid of Malema and you will already be on the first step to pull this country together!

  • Chibuli - 2011-06-27 20:59

    These racist Black radicals who proclaim that Whites stole "their land" are only showing their lack of education and knowledge of the historical facts. Is there anyone in the ANCYL who knows the truth, and understands the facts about land ownership in Southern Africa?

  • Ho Hum@24.com - 2011-06-28 07:35

    Leebarashun BEE four airjukashun!!

  • York Hunt - 2011-06-28 07:44

    Historically, land disputes always resulted in the shedding of blood. If you come and take what's mine, I guarantee you, history will repeat itself!

  • Dave Robbins - 2011-06-28 08:42

    Let's look at the last "Land Grab" example, namely Zimbabwe. In 2000 the country was self-sufficient in it's food needs; by 2008 it was producing 20% of what it was producing in 2000. Of a population of 13 million, approximately 3 million had fled to neighbouring countries. It is estimated by food agencies that 80% of the population depends in some way on international food aid. Zimbabwe has a population split of 70% rural and 30% urban. Now take South Africa - population approximately 49 million (5 times greater than Zim) and a population split the other way round, i.e 70% urban and 30% rural. Do we really want a disaster on the scale of Zimbabwe, only 5 times greater?