Burial of Argentine dictator opposed

2013-05-23 14:03
Hundreds of people repudiate the possible burial of the remains of Argentinian former dictator (1976-1981) Jorge Rafael Videla in the city's cemetery. (Juan Roleri, AFP)

Hundreds of people repudiate the possible burial of the remains of Argentinian former dictator (1976-1981) Jorge Rafael Videla in the city's cemetery. (Juan Roleri, AFP)

Multimedia   ·   User Galleries   ·   News in Pictures Send us your pictures  ·  Send us your stories

Mercedes - Hundreds of demonstrators took to the streets on Wednesday to protest against the possible burial of the late former dictator Jorge Videla in his home town.

"Neither Dead, nor Alive," "May He Not Rest in Peace" were among the banners waved by angry demonstrators on the streets where Videla, who led Argentina during its last military dictatorship, was born.

Videla, dictator from 1976 to 1981 at the height of Argentina's "Dirty War" against a leftist opposition, died Friday in prison while serving time for crimes against humanity. He was 87 years old.

Court officials have not said publicly where he may be interred. According to local media, the silence is due to an informal agreement between officials and Videla's relatives.

Speculation has focused on the city of his birth.

"For my generation, Videla is a sinister person," said Silvina Sukich, a 56-year-old doctor.

30 000 'disappeared'

"Sure, everyone deserves to be buried where they want, but you have to do things differently for someone who did not give us the chance to bury our own dead where we wanted."

Marcelo Melo, human rights official for the town west of Buenos Aires, insists: "This is what the people of Mercedes think."

"We repudiate what Videla was and what the dictatorship was."

Rules approved in 2009 ban any ex-military leader sentenced for rights abuses from receiving military honours at his funeral.

During his rule, Videla launched a fierce crackdown on leftists and suspected supporters. As many as 30 000 people were kidnapped and "disappeared" during the military regime's rule, which ended in 1983.

An unrepentant Videla told a court in his last public appearance on 14 May that his subordinates followed his orders. He assumed "full military responsibility for the actions of the army in the war against terrorism".

Speculation

Mercedes - Hundreds of demonstrators took to the streets on Wednesday to protest against the possible burial of the late former dictator Jorge Videla in his home town.

"Neither Dead, nor Alive," "May He Not Rest in Peace" were among the banners waved by angry demonstrators on the streets where Videla, who led Argentina during its last military dictatorship, was born.

Videla, dictator from 1976 to 1981 at the height of Argentina's "Dirty War" against a leftist opposition, died Friday in prison while serving time for crimes against humanity. He was 87 years old.

Court officials have not said publicly where he may be interred. According to local media, the silence is due to an informal agreement between officials and Videla's relatives.

Speculation has focused on the city of his birth.

"For my generation, Videla is a sinister person," said Silvina Sukich, a 56-year-old doctor.

'Assumed responsibility'

"Sure, everyone deserves to be buried where they want, but you have to do things differently for someone who did not give us the chance to bury our own dead where we wanted."

Marcelo Melo, human rights official for the town west of Buenos Aires, insists: "This is what the people of Mercedes think."

"We repudiate what Videla was and what the dictatorship was."

Rules approved in 2009 ban any ex-military leader sentenced for rights abuses from receiving military honours at his funeral.

During his rule, Videla launched a fierce crackdown on leftists and suspected supporters. As many as 30 000 people were kidnapped and "disappeared" during the military regime's rule, which ended in 1983.

An unrepentant Videla told a court in his last public appearance on 14 May that his subordinates followed his orders. He assumed "full military responsibility for the actions of the army in the war against terrorism."

Read more on:    argentina  |  war crimes

Join the conversation!

24.com encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions.

24.com publishes all comments posted on articles provided that they adhere to our Comments Policy. Should you wish to report a comment for editorial review, please do so by clicking the 'Report Comment' button to the right of each comment.

Comment on this story
1 comment
Comments have been closed for this article.

Inside News24

 
/News

Book flights

Compare, Book, Fly

Traffic Alerts
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Settings

Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.




Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.