Greenpeace slams Japan radiation screening

2011-10-20 09:20

Tokyo - Greenpeace called on Tokyo to toughen radiation screening and food labelling rules on Thursday after it said low levels of radiation had been detected in seafood sold at Japanese stores.

The environmental pressure group said it tested 60 seafood samples bought at stores in eastern Japan operated by five major supermarket chains and found 34 of them with radioactive caesium-134 and caesium-137.

The survey discovered readings of up to 88 becquerel per kilogram (Bq/kg) with the radiation believed to be from the ongoing nuclear accident.

"While the samples are well below the 500Bq/kg limit set by the authorities, the contaminated seafood still represents a health risk, especially to pregnant women and children, and it is being distributed over a wide area," said Wakao Hanaoka, Greenpeace Japan oceans campaigner.

The Japanese standard compares with a 150Bq/kg limit in Ukraine after the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the group said.


"More concerning, however, is that there is no labelling that notifies consumers if the seafood had been screened, making it impossible for them to make informed decisions," Hanaoka said in a statement.

The announcement came as Japanese consumers remain frustrated over limited information about the exact level of food contamination, while the government has sought to calm public fears and overcome mistrust of official radiation surveys.

Authorities say food is safe but consumers have generally avoided products from the regions near the wrecked Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, which went through meltdowns and explosions after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.

The Fukushima disaster is the worst atomic disaster since Chernobyl 25 years ago.

Greenpeace, which bought the samples in September and October, has requested the government and a retail industry body to improve seafood product screening and to publicise the level of contamination in the labels.

The group has sent letters to the Japan Chain Stores Association demanding them to conduct radiation checks on their own and disclose the results to consumers.

Comprehensive screening and labelling should help protect consumers and raise their confidence in food they purchase, said Greenpeace's Hanaoka, adding that it should eventually help the fishing industry.

"Japanese consumers have legitimate concerns about the food they buy," Greenpeace's Hanaoka said.

  • wesleywt - 2011-10-20 09:28

    Greenpeace...what a bunch of muppets.

  • badballie - 2011-10-20 11:53

    [A] study [by University of Texas engineering professor Steven Biegalski and researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory] reports that more radioxenon was released from the Fukushima facilities than in the 1979 meltdown at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station in Pennsylvania and in the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster in the Ukraine. The amount of radiation released during the Fukushima nuclear disaster was so great that the level of atmospheric radioactive aerosols in Washington state was 10,000 to 100,000 times greater than normal levels in the week following the March 11 earthquake and tsunami that triggered the disaster. Greenpeace is also towing party line, the whole of Japan is more toxic than Chernobyl which accounted for over 980 000 cases of radiation poisoning

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