Hundreds of couples re-enact Times Square kiss

2015-08-14 21:02
Times Square kiss (AFP)

Times Square kiss (AFP)

Multimedia   ·   User Galleries   ·   News in Pictures Send us your pictures  ·  Send us your stories

New York - Hundreds of couples poured into New York's Times Square on Friday to re-enact the famous photograph of a kiss between a sailor and a woman celebrating the end of WWII.

Photojournalist Alfred Eisenstaedt took the photograph as news broke that Japan had surrendered on August 14 1945, bringing to a close the most brutal conflict the world has ever known.

The photo, known as "V-J Day in Times Square" for Victory over Japan, shows an American sailor kissing a woman in white, full on the mouth as her right foot rises off the ground.

Some of Friday's couples turned out in replica outfits, the men dressed in sailor suits and the women in white.

They clasped each other, locking lips in the same pose to the delight of passing tourists.

World War II veterans Ray and Ellie Williams, who got married on August 15 1945, were guests of honour and flew in from the southern US state of Georgia for the event.

Ray Williams said he remembered the joy and jubilation that greeted the end of the war.

"We experienced that joy, it was a Friday evening. Jubilation broke out all over the country," he said. "We were double excited, celebrating the end of the war and also our marriage."

A sculpture of the kiss was also installed in Times Square for the occasion.

In the evening of August 14 1945 more than two million people are estimated to have gathered in Times Square to hear the news and share in the joy.

Eisenstaedt's photograph was published in Life magazine. He was in so much haste to cover the breaking news that he did not stop to ask the name of the couple.

Their faces are not clearly visible in the photograph and their identity remains a mystery. Eleven men and three women have since come forward to claim they are in the photograph.

Japan surrendered on August 14 1945 after America dropped two atomic bombs, on Hiroshima et Nagasaki, which killed more than 100 000 people instantly.

Tokyo signed its surrender on September 2.

Read more on:    us

Join the conversation! encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions. publishes all comments posted on articles provided that they adhere to our Comments Policy. Should you wish to report a comment for editorial review, please do so by clicking the 'Report Comment' button to the right of each comment.

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Inside News24


Book flights

Compare, Book, Fly

Traffic Alerts
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.


Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire network.


Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.