Police cases stir US protests, debate

2014-12-05 17:11
(File: AP)

(File: AP)

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New York - Thousands of people of diverse races and ethnicities took to the streets from New York City to San Francisco for a second straight night to protest the "Garner ruling".

Grandparents marched with their grandchildren. Experienced activists stood alongside newcomers, and protesters of all colours chanted slogans.

Tensions were already high after a grand jury last week cleared an officer in the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. Then on Wednesday came the decision that Officer Daniel Pantaleo would not be indicted in the choke-hold death of Eric Garner. In both cases the officers were white and the victims were black.

The two decisions stirred a national conversation about race, police training and the grand jury process.

'Under siege'

"We're under siege and it has to stop," Harlem resident Judy Edwards said at a rally on Thursday night in lower Manhattan's Foley Square.

The 61-year-old black woman was accompanied by her daughter and twin 10-year-old grandchildren, a boy and a girl. She said it was important to her that the children saw a crowd that was racially mixed and diverse in many other ways all insisting upon the same thing - that something must be done.

That was the message, too, in cities across America: Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Denver, Detroit, Minneapolis Oakland, San Francisco and Washington, DC, among them.

Sign-carrying, chanting demonstrators marched down heavily-travelled streets and shut down highways and bridges. Politicians talked about the need for better police training, body cameras and changes in the grand jury process to restore faith in the legal system.

New York governor Andrew Cuomo said a "long string of events" involving the deaths of black men at the hands of police, not just the Eric Garner case in New York City, threaten to erode the belief many Americans have in the nation's criminal justice system.

Cuomo, speaking on NBC's Today on Friday, said the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and similar previous cases in New York City show that it's necessary to "pull back the lens to understand it's not just about Eric Garner."

'Fundamental problem'

The governor said if people don't feel they're fairly represented by the justice system, "you have a fundamental problem".

In New York, Mayor Bill de Blasio - blasted by police union leaders who accused him of not supporting his officers - outlined previously announced plans to teach officers how to communicate better with people on the street.

US President Barack Obama also weighed in, saying one of the chief issues at stake is "making sure that people have confidence that police and law enforcement and prosecutors are serving everybody equally”.

But US representative Peter King told AP: "The black community is not right to be upset about the ruling. If this were a white person it would have been the same thing."

New York demonstrators targeted the city's major traffic arteries again on Thursday. Police say they arrested more than 200 demonstrators in New York City on Thursday night.

Marches, die-ins and gridlock

New Orleans residents held a die-in at a holiday light show and police moved in to separate them from spectators, some of whom yelled at the demonstrators.

In Chicago, hundreds of protesters blocked Lake Shore Drive. The protesters were thwarted in their efforts to march to Soldier Field, where the American football teams, the Chicago Bears and the Dallas Cowboys were playing.

In San Francisco, protesters blocked Market Street, at one point lying down en masse, causing gridlock until police spurred them to move to Union Square. In Oakland, several dozen protesters walked the streets shouting "No justice! No peace! Jail the racist police!"

In Washington, protesters gathered in front of the justice department and marched close to the Ellipse where holiday revellers - including the president and his family - celebrated the lighting of the national Christmas tree. A second march went from the district's police headquarters to city hall, where former DC mayor Marion Barry's remains are lying in repose.

Read more on:    barak obama  |  michael brown  |  us

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