Sri Lankan Tamils vote in former warzone

2013-09-21 11:47
A Sri Lankan police officer stands guard as ethnic Tamils wait to cast their vote at a polling station in Jaffna. (Eranga Jayawardena, AP)

A Sri Lankan police officer stands guard as ethnic Tamils wait to cast their vote at a polling station in Jaffna. (Eranga Jayawardena, AP)

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Jaffna - Voters in Sri Lanka's north thronged to polling stations on Saturday in an election that threatens to rekindle animosity between the government and ethnic minority Tamils, four years after the military crushed separatists and ended a 26-year war.

The provincial council election is the first in 25 years in the north, once the heartland of Tamil Tiger separatists. President Mahinda Rajapaksa's government is holding the poll after facing international pressure to restore democracy.

Defeat for Rajapaksa's government would be largely symbolic. But victory for the main Tamil party, the Tamil National Alliance (TNA), could reignite calls for autonomy.

Long queues of patient voters formed in the morning at polling stations. Most had a holy ash mark on their foreheads, a sign they had attended prayers at Hindu temples.

Many voters called for restitution of land, the departure of the national army, accused of human rights abuses in the final stages of the war, and some even for a separate state.

Many were clearly keen to elect their own local leaders - 38 provincial councillors - for the first time in three decades. But some candidates complained of intimidation and irregularities.

"Tamils need independence. We need our lands back. We need the right to move freely," said Gopalasuthanthiran Pushpavathi, a 51-year mother of four, after voting at a polling station behind the imposing Nallur Temple.

"I am happy that we have six votes in my family and we cast the votes with the hope of getting a separate province that is ruled by ourselves," said Kandiah Thiyagarajah, 63.

Residents complained of intimidation, saying the military visited their homes to tell them not to vote for the TNA. The party is the former political proxy of the defeated rebels, who launched the war for a separate state to end what Tamil activists saw as systematic discrimination by Sri Lanka's Sinhalese majority.


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