Students protest against Nepal's ex-king

2013-06-10 14:00
Former Nepalese King Gyanendra Shah performs a ritual during a worshiping ceremony of the Hindu goddess Banglamukhi at a temple in Kathmandu. (Naresh Shrestha, AFP)

Former Nepalese King Gyanendra Shah performs a ritual during a worshiping ceremony of the Hindu goddess Banglamukhi at a temple in Kathmandu. (Naresh Shrestha, AFP)

Multimedia   ·   User Galleries   ·   News in Pictures Send us your pictures  ·  Send us your stories

Kathmandu - Dozens of students staged a rare protest on Monday against Nepal's former king at the start of his private pilgrimage in the southeast of the country, police said.

Police arrested six protesters after they blocked roads and tore down banners welcoming Gyanendra Shah to Saptari district, in a rare demonstration against the monarchy which was abolished five years ago.

"They also dismantled makeshift gates [built over the roads] welcoming the former monarch," Rajendra Thakuri, a local police officer of Saptari district, told AFP.

He said the students were angry at public displays of support for Nepal's monarch, particularly banners in the town of Rajbiraj that still proclaimed the former king as "His Majesty King Gyanendra".

Police said around 60 protesters blocked roads throughout the district, forcing their closure and prompting police to deploy some 300 officers.

"They have shut down the district. Only a handful of vehicles are plying because they fear for their safety. Some protesters have snatched the keys of some vehicles," Thakuri said.

Gyanendra left the sprawling royal palace in Kathmandu five years ago after a parliament dominated by Maoist former rebels voted to abolish the monarchy.

Since then, the impoverished young republic has struggled to move on from a decade-long civil war between the leftist guerrillas and the state that ended in 2006.

There is growing public frustration at the slow pace of political progress, and the royal family remains respected among some older Nepalese.

Sagar Timalsina, an aide to Gyanendra, told AFP the former monarch would visit Hindu temples and meet supporters during his two-week long tour that would cover seven districts.

"This is a purely religious visit. As a Nepali citizen, he can travel anywhere in the country. The visit is not politically motivated. But as a citizen, he can obviously have some interest in politics," Timalsina said.

Read more on:    nepal

Join the conversation! encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions. publishes all comments posted on articles provided that they adhere to our Comments Policy. Should you wish to report a comment for editorial review, please do so by clicking the 'Report Comment' button to the right of each comment.

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Inside News24


Book flights

Compare, Book, Fly

Traffic Alerts
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.


Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire network.


Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.