Thailand: Army will protect election

2013-12-27 09:53
Anti-government protesters wave Thai national flags next to barbed wire during demonstration near parliament in Bangkok. (File, AFP)

Anti-government protesters wave Thai national flags next to barbed wire during demonstration near parliament in Bangkok. (File, AFP)

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Bangkok - Thailand said on Friday that it would ask the army to provide security for the February elections after violent clashes between police and opposition protesters left two people dead and more than 150 wounded.

Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra's government on Thursday rejected a call by the kingdom's election commission to postpone the vote, after a policeman was shot dead during political violence in the capital.

A 30-year-old civilian who was struck by a bullet in the chest during the unrest also died in hospital early on Friday, according to the public health ministry.

It said 153 people were injured, of whom 38 were still hospitalised.

Deputy Prime Minister Surapong Tovichakchaikul said he would ask the armed forces supreme commander for help with security for a second round of registration for constituency candidates due to begin around the country on Saturday.

"I will also ask the military to provide security protection for members of the public on the 2 February election date," he said in a nationally televised address.

Bloodshed

Yingluck's government which still enjoys strong support in the northern half of the country has faced weeks of mass street rallies in the capital seeking to curb her family's political dominance.

Police fired tear gas and rubber bullets on Thursday at rock-throwing demonstrators who tried to force their way into a sports stadium in the capital where election candidates were gathered to register for the polls.

The security forces denied using live ammunition.

Thailand has been periodically convulsed by political bloodshed since Yingluck's older brother Thaksin Shinawatra was overthrown by royalist generals in a coup seven years ago.

The protesters have vowed to block the February election, saying it will only return Thaksin's allies to power.

Supporter of the billionaire tycoon-turned-politician, who lives in self-exile, have accused the demonstrators of trying to incite the military to seize power again, in a country which has seen 18 successful or attempted coups since 1932.


Read more on:    yingluck shinawatra  |  thaksin shinawatra  |  thailand

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