News24

UK Army defuses 225kg bomb

2011-04-09 19:30

Dublin - A 225kg van bomb defused on Saturday near the Irish border probably was destined to strike a Northern Ireland town in a bid to undermine Northern Ireland's election campaign, police and political leaders said.

Police Chief Superintendent Alasdair Robinson said the dissident IRA bomb left Thursday night under a freeway overpass was properly constructed but abandoned before it could be detonated.

He said it was likely that the attackers stopped short of their intended target because of a police road checkpoint.

The bomb - roughly double the size of a half-dozen car bombs that Irish Republican Army dissidents detonated last year in Northern Ireland - could have caused "huge devastation and loss of life" if it had exploded in a town centre, Robinson said.

Last year's bombs all caused little damage and no serious injuries.

The bomb alert closed the major road and rail line connecting Belfast and Dublin for all of Friday. It also showcased the public's low regard for the threat posed by dissident IRA bombers, whose devices usually fail to explode properly.

IRA dissidents questioned over killing

After police shut down the main road south of the border town of Newry, impatient motorists unwilling to take a diversion moved the traffic cones and sandbagged "road closed" signs.

BBC Northern Ireland footage showed dozens of cars driving directly past the van on Friday morning before police reinforced the barriers.

Police are continuing to question three suspected IRA dissidents over last weekend's killing of a 25-year-old Catholic police recruit, who died when a booby-trap bomb detonated under his car in his driveway.

He was the first member of Northern Ireland's security forces to be killed by IRA dissidents in two years.

Police say several splinter groups opposed to the IRA's 2005 decisions to disarm and renounce violence are trying to increase their violence in the run-up to a May 5 election of the Northern Ireland Assembly.

The electoral campaign follows a surprisingly successful, stable four-year run for the British territory's new Catholic-Protestant administration, whose members are all Assembly members and face re-election.

Comments
  • veld66 - 2011-04-09 19:45

    British should leave Ireland, down with colonialism .....

      Irelander - 2011-04-09 22:30

      Thats hardly going to happen man - especially since the majority of people up north are happy not being apart of the republic. Its now a democracy both proddies and catholics are in power. Leaps and bounds from where we were 15 years ago.

  • Palian - 2011-04-09 22:55

    Lets send McScum...er...McBride to make the bomb. No, wait...the target wasn't a group of innocent teens. I bet his wife diggs sweating under his brave bod, her REAL man!

  • beicime - 2011-04-09 23:16

    It’s a pity that some people don’t know how to build a life and a country and prosper in peace.

      koolaid - 2011-04-10 11:36

      The Irish Know how to do that - without the English.

  • koolaid - 2011-04-10 07:14

    There will never be peace in Ireland till the BRITISH GO HOME!!!!

  • koolaid - 2011-04-10 07:15

    There will never be peace in Ireland till the BRITISH GO HOME!!!!

  • brinjal - 2011-04-10 08:35

    Ireland has no economy without the Brits.

      koolaid - 2011-04-10 11:32

      Don't talk trip man. The only thing the British brought to Ireland was WAR!! like everywhere else they go.

      koolaid - 2011-04-10 11:33

      Tripe -

  • RedCherry - 2011-04-10 09:17

    It's interesting that a number of comments here are anti-British. These same people (from their posts elsewhere) are also anti-ANC/Struggle, so I think we have a little hypocrisy, don't we? The IRA are/were terrorists, as far as the British are concerned, much as the ANC was (and by some still is) perceived to be here. So what, I wonder, gives those commentators the right to their double standards? As has been correctly stated, the people of Northern Ireland have voted, on several occasions, to remain as part of the United Kingdom. That's their choice and of no concern to the likes of veld66 and koolaid, especially as these two are probably descendants of colonists themselves. People in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.

  • RedCherry - 2011-04-10 09:18

    It's interesting that a number of comments here are anti-British. These same people (from their posts elsewhere) are also anti-ANC/Struggle, so I think we have a little hypocrisy, don't we? The IRA are/were terrorists, as far as the British are concerned, much as the ANC was (and by some still is) perceived to be here. So what, I wonder, gives those commentators the right to their double standards? As has been correctly stated, the people of Northern Ireland have voted, on several occasions, to remain as part of the United Kingdom. That's their choice and of no concern to the likes of veld66 and koolaid, especially as these two are probably descendants of colonists themselves. People in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.

  • RedCherry - 2011-04-10 09:18

    It's interesting that a number of comments here are anti-British. These same people (from their posts elsewhere) are also anti-ANC/Struggle, so I think we have a little hypocrisy, don't we? The IRA are/were t*rrorists, as far as the British are concerned, much as the ANC was (and by some still is) perceived to be here. So what, I wonder, gives those commentators the right to their double standards? As has been correctly stated, the people of Northern Ireland have voted, on several occasions, to remain as part of the United Kingdom. That's their choice and of no concern to the likes of veld66 and koolaid, especially as these two are probably descendants of colonists themselves. People in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.

  • RedCherry - 2011-04-10 09:19

    It's interesting that a number of comments here are anti-British. These same people (from their posts elsewhere) are also anti-ANC/Struggle, so I think we have a little hypocrisy, don't we? The IRA are/were t*rr*rists, as far as the British are concerned, much as the ANC was (and by some still is) perceived to be here. So what, I wonder, gives those commentators the right to their double standards? As has been correctly stated, the people of Northern Ireland have voted, on several occasions, to remain as part of the United Kingdom. That's their choice and of no concern to the likes of veld66 and koolaid, especially as these two are probably descendants of colonists themselves. People in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.

  • RedCherry - 2011-04-10 09:19

    It's interesting that a number of comments here are anti-British. These same people (from their posts elsewhere) are also anti-ANC/Struggle, so I think we have a little hypocrisy, don't we? The IRA are/were t*rr*r*sts, as far as the British are concerned, much as the ANC was (and by some still is) perceived to be here. So what, I wonder, gives those commentators the right to their double standards? As has been correctly stated, the people of Northern Ireland have voted, on several occasions, to remain as part of the United Kingdom. That's their choice and of no concern to the likes of veld66 and koolaid, especially as these two are probably descendants of colonists themselves. People in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.

  • RedCherry - 2011-04-10 09:20

    Test

  • RedCherry - 2011-04-10 09:21

    It's interesting that a number of comments here are anti-British. These same people (from their posts elsewhere) are also anti-ANC/Struggle, so I think we have a little hypocrisy, don't we? The IRA are/were terrorists, as far as the British are concerned, much as the ANC was (and by some still is) perceived to be here. So what, I wonder, gives those commentators the right to their double standards? As has been correctly stated, the people of Northern Ireland have voted, on several occasions, to remain as part of the United Kingdom. That's their choice and of no concern to the likes of veld66 and koolaid, especially as these two are probably descendants of colonists themselves. People in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.

      koolaid - 2011-04-10 11:19

      Northern Ireland is part and parcel of a UNITED IRELAND and is my concern - I'm a thoroughbred Irishman. The British are invaders in Ireland and have no right to be there. So f#@k the British and you too - Muppet

      Palian - 2011-04-10 14:52

      correct...they should rather throw bombs ;)

  • Palian - 2011-04-10 15:02

    OK, I want to talk about Ireland Specifically I want to talk about the "famine" About the fact that there never really was one There was no "famine" See Irish people were only allowed to eat potatoes All of the other food Meat fish vegetables Were shipped out of the country under armed guard To England while the Irish people starved And then on the middle of all this They gave us money not to teach our children Irish And so we lost our history And this is what I think is still hurting me See we're like a child that's been battered Has to drive itself out of it's head because it's frightened Still feels all the painful feelings But they lose contact with the memory And this leads to massive self-destruction alcoholism, drug adiction All desperate attempts at running And in it's worst form Becomes actual killing And if there ever is gonna be healing There has to be remembering And then grieving So that there then can be forgiving There has to be knowledge and understanding All the lonely people where do they all come from An American army regulation Says you mustn't kill more than 10% of a nation 'Cos to do so causes permanent "psychological damage" It's not permanent but they didn't know that Anyway during the supposed "famine" We lost a lot more than 10% of our nation Through deaths on land or on ships of emigration But what finally broke us was not starvation but it's use in the controlling of our education Schools go on about "Black 47" On and on about "The terrible famine" But what they don't say is in truth There really never was one (Excuse me) All the lonely people (I'm sorry, excuse me) Where do they all come from (that I can tell you in one word) All the lonely people where do they all belong So let's take a look shall we The highest statistics of child abuse in the EEC And we say we're a Christian country But we've lost contact with our history See we used to worship God as a mother We're sufferin from post traumatic stress disorder Look at all our old men in the pubs Look at all our young people on drugs We used to worship God as a mother Now look at what we're doing to each other We've even made killers of ourselves The most child-like trusting people in the Universe And this is what's wrong with us Our history books the parent figures lied to us I see the Irish As a race like a child That got itself basned in the face And if there ever is gonna be healing There has to be remembering And then grieving So that there then can be forgiving There has to be knowledge and understanding All the lonely people Where do they all come from All the lonely people Where do they all come from - Sinead O'Connor

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