World hopes for first clues to MH370 mystery

2015-08-05 15:50
Police officers looking at a piece of debris from a plane in Saint-Andre, Reunion. (Reunion 1ere, AP)

Police officers looking at a piece of debris from a plane in Saint-Andre, Reunion. (Reunion 1ere, AP)

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WATCH: This ocean drift model could show the position of MH370

2015-08-05 09:33

Ocean drift modelling may show the position of missing MH370; it has already indicated Indonesia is not the most likely location.WATCH

Toulouse - Experts in France were set to examine a washed-up plane part on Wednesday that likely belonged to doomed flight MH370, more than a year after it vanished, hoping to find clues to one of aviation's greatest enigmas.

The Malaysia Airlines jet disappeared on March 8 last year, inexplicably veering off course en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 people on board, sparking a colossal but ultimately fruitless multinational hunt for the aircraft.

But last week's discovery of a two-metre-long wing part called a flaperon on the French Indian Ocean island of Reunion raised fresh hopes for relatives desperate for answers.

French and Malaysian experts arrived at a laboratory in southern France on Wednesday afternoon for the tests.

The head of Malaysia's civil aviation watchdog Azharuddin Abdul Rahman and staff from France's BEA agency, which probes air accidents, entered the lab in the city of Toulouse without making any statements.

The case containing the wing part was set to be opened in the presence of French, Malaysian and Australian experts, Boeing employees and representatives from China - the country that lost the most passengers.

It is unclear whether their conclusions will be announced the same day or later.

Paint, traces of explosion? 

Jean-Paul Troadec, former BEA chief, said the analysis would focus on two issues - whether the flaperon belongs to MH370 and if so, whether it can shed light on the plane's final moments.

He pointed to the paint on the piece as one key element of the probe.

"Every airline paints their planes in a certain way," he said. "If the paint used is used by Malaysia Airlines... there may be more certainty."

Pierre Bascary, former director of tests at the French Defence Procurement Agency, where the analysis will take place, added that the airline may have written maintenance information on the piece such as "Do Not Walk".

"The phrase used and the way it was written also gives an idea of the origin of the plane," he said.

Australia's Deputy Prime Minister Warren Truss, meanwhile, said drift modelling performed by the national science agency confirmed debris could have been carried by wind and currents to Reunion, about 4 000km from the region where MH370 was thought to have gone down.

Xavier Tytelman, an expert on aviation security, told RTL radio the wing part was already widely believed to be part of MH370, and experts were looking for "legal evidence".

But crucially, the debris could also yield information on the final moments of the plane.

Troadec said experts would examine the way the part detached itself from the wing.

"Was it in a violent impact with the sea or not?" he said. "This piece looks like it is in good condition, it doesn't look like the part of a plane that fell vertically in the water at 900km an hour."

He added that experts may also look for traces of an explosion or fire.

Scientists have pointed to the barnacles attached to the flaperon, saying these could give an idea of how long the piece has been in the water, and perhaps where it has been.

"If it has cold-water barnacles on it that might tell them it went down further south than they think. Or if it's got only tropical barnacles, that might tell them it went down further north," said Shane Ahyong, a crustacean specialist from the Australian Museum.

No 'miracles' 

Troadec warned that the analysis was highly unlikely to give any clues as to why the plane mysteriously diverted off course.

"One should not expect miracles," he said.

For the victims' loved ones, though, any tangible piece of information is likely to help them in seeking closure, according to psychologist Carole Damiani, who specialises in helping the families of people who died in disasters.

"The grieving process is about untying oneself from someone, accepting that they will not be found and they have gone forever," she said.

"When someone goes missing, it is difficult to say 'I will stop looking'," she added. "You need people to say 'he is dead, you are allowed to start the grieving process and undo this bond'."


Read more on:    china  |  france  |  malaysia  |  malaysia airlines flight mh370

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