Maria knocks out power, triggers flooding in Puerto Rico

2017-09-20 22:04
Storm clouds form as Hurricane Maria approaches the island in Luquillo, Puerto Rico. (Ricardo Arduengo/AFP)

Storm clouds form as Hurricane Maria approaches the island in Luquillo, Puerto Rico. (Ricardo Arduengo/AFP)

Multimedia   ·   User Galleries   ·   News in Pictures Send us your pictures  ·  Send us your stories

San Juan - The strongest hurricane to hit Puerto Rico in over 80 years destroyed hundreds of homes, knocked out power across the entire island and triggered heavy flooding Wednesday in an onslaught that could plunge the US territory deeper into financial crisis.

Leaving at least nine people dead in its wake across the Caribbean, Hurricane Maria blew ashore in the morning in the southeast coastal town of Yabucoa as a Category 4 storm with winds of 250 kph.

It was expected to punish the island of 3.4 million people with life-threatening winds for 12 to 24 hours.

READ: Hurricane Maria threatens to flatten Puerto Rico after slamming Dominica

"Once we're able to go outside, we're going to find our island destroyed," said Abner Gomez, Puerto Rico's emergency management director. "The information we have received is not encouraging. It's a system that has destroyed everything in its path."

It was the second time in two weeks that Puerto Rico felt the wrath of a hurricane.

There was no immediate word of any deaths or serious injuries.

As people waited it out in shelters or took cover inside stairwells, bathrooms and closets, Maria brought down cell towers and power lines, snapped trees, tore off roofs and unloaded at least 20 inches (50 centimeters) of rain.

Widespread flooding was reported, with dozens of cars half-submerged in some neighborhoods and many streets turned into rivers. People calling local radio stations reported that doors were being torn off their hinges and a water tank flew away.

Assessing the damages

Felix Delgado, mayor of the northern coastal city of Catano, told The Associated Press that 80 percent of the 454 homes in a neighbourhood known as Juana Matos were destroyed. The fishing community on San Juan Bay was hit with a storm surge of more than 4 feet, he said.

"Months and months and months and months are going to pass before we can recover from this," he said.

Maria had weakened to a Category 3, with winds of 185 kph. It was off Puerto Rico's northwest coast, moving at about 20 kph, and was expected to pass off the coast of the Dominican Republic late Wednesday and Thursday.

Even before the storm, Puerto Rico's electrical grid was crumbling and the island was in dire condition financially.

Puerto Rico is struggling to restructure a portion of its $73bn debt, and the government has warned it is running out of money as it fights back against furloughs and other austerity measures imposed by a federal board overseeing the island's finances.

'We are stronger than any hurricane'

Governor Ricardo Rossello urged people to have faith: "We are stronger than any hurricane. Together, we will rebuild."

He later asked President Donald Trump to declare the island a disaster zone, a step that would open the way to federal aid.

Many feared extended power outages would further sink businesses struggling amid a recession that has lasted more than a decade.

"This is going to be a disaster," said Jean Robert Auguste, who owns two French restaurants and sought shelter at a San Juan hotel. "We haven't made any money this month."

More than 11 000 people — and more than 580 pets — were in shelters, authorities said.

Along the island's northern coast, an emergency medical station in the town of Arecibo lost its roof, while communication was severed with several emergency management posts. A hospital and a police station reported broken windows, and a tree fell on an ambulance.

The heavy winds and rain and the noise of things crashing outside woke many across Puerto Rico before daybreak. At one recently built hotel in San Juan, water dripped through the ceiling of a sixth-floor room and seeped through the window.

"I didn't sleep at all," said Merike Mai, a vacationing 35-year-old flight attendant from Estonia.

READ: Hurricane Maria smashes Dominica, now menaces other islands

As the storm closed in on the Dominican Republic, about 4 000 tourists in the Bavara-Punta Cana area on the eastern tip of the island were moved to hotels in Santo Domingo, the capital.

Maria posed no immediate threat to the US The long-range forecast showed the storm out in the Atlantic Ocean hundreds of miles off the Georgia-South Carolina coast by Monday morning.

Previously a Category 5 with 281 kph winds, Maria hit Puerto Rico as the third-strongest storm to make landfall in the US, based on a key measurement that meteorologists use: air pressure. The lower the central pressure, the stronger a storm.

Maria's pressure was 917 millibars, lower than Hurricane Irma's 929 millibars when it roared into the Florida Keys earlier this month.

Irma sideswiped Puerto Rico on September 6, causing no deaths or widespread damage on the island but leaving more than 1 million people without electricity. More than 70 000 still had no power as Maria approached.

The last Category 4 hurricane to blow ashore in Puerto Rico was in 1932, and the strongest ever to hit the island was San Felipe in 1928 with winds of 250 kph.

READ: Maria makes landfall in 'potentially catastrophic' hurricane

As Maria closed in, Trump offered his support via Twitter: "Puerto Rico being hit hard by new monster Hurricane. Be careful, our hearts are with you - will be there to help!"

The storm's center passed near or over St. Croix overnight Tuesday, prompting US Virgin Islands Governor Kenneth Mapp to warn people to sleep in their street clothes and shoes just in case. St. Croix was largely spared by Irma.

Nykole Tyson, a spokesperson at the US Virgin Islands Emergency Operations Center, said that there were no immediate reports of deaths or injuries on St. Croix but that it was still too dangerous Wednesday to venture out and conduct a thorough check.

On the island of Dominica, which got slammed late on Monday, Hartley Henry, an adviser to the prime minister, reported at least seven deaths and a "tremendous loss of housing and public buildings." He said the country was "in a daze," with no electricity and little to no communications.

"The situation is really grave," Consul General Barbara Dailey said in New York.


Read more on:    puerto rico

Join the conversation!

24.com encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions.
NEXT ON NEWS24X

Inside News24

 
/Africa
Traffic Alerts
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Settings

Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.




Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.