North Korea fires missiles, three reach Japan waters

2017-03-06 05:35
(iStock)

(iStock)

Multimedia   ·   User Galleries   ·   News in Pictures Send us your pictures  ·  Send us your stories

Seoul - Nuclear-armed North Korea launched four ballistic missiles on Monday in another challenge to US President Donald Trump, with three landing provocatively close to America's ally Japan.

Seoul and Washington began annual joint military exercises last week that always infuriate Pyongyang, with the North's military warning of "merciless nuclear counter-action".

Under leader Kim Jong-Un, Pyongyang has ambitions to develop an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) capable of reaching the US mainland - which Trump has vowed will not happen.

Seoul said four missiles were fired from North Pyongan province into the East Sea - its name for the Sea of Japan - and that South Korea and the US were "closely analysing" tracking data for further details.

The missiles travelled around 1 000 kilometres and reached an altitude of 260 kilometres, said a spokesperson for South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff, adding they were unlikely to be ICBMs.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said three of the North Korean missiles came down in Tokyo's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) - waters extending 200 nautical miles (370 kilometres) from its coast.

'Serious, provocative action'

"This clearly shows North Korea has entered a new stage of threat," Abe said in parliament.

"Repeated launches by North Korea are a serious, provocative action in terms of security and clearly violate UN security council resolutions. We can never tolerate this."

Pyongyang carried out two atomic tests last year and a series of missile launches, but Monday was only the second time its devices entered Japan's EEZ.

After an emergency meeting of South Korea's National Security Council, acting president Hwang Kyo-Ahn called the North's nuclear and missile provocations "immediate and real threats" to his country.

"Considering the North Korean leadership's brutality and recklessness shown through the murder of Kim Jong-Nam, the results of the North having a nuclear weapon in its hands will be gruesome beyond imagination," he said.

Seoul has blamed Pyongyang for the killing of the half-brother of the North's leader by two women using VX nerve agent at Kuala Lumpur's international airport last month.

Hwang called for "swift deployment" of a US missile defence system, THAAD, a proposal which has infuriated neighbouring China, the North's key diplomatic protector and main provider of trade and aid.

Seoul said its armed forces were "closely monitoring the North's military for further provocations and maintaining military readiness".

'Big, big problem'

Trump has described the North as a "big, big problem" and vowed to deal with the issue "very strongly".

Pyongyang fired a ballistic missile last month - its first such launch since October - which Seoul said was aimed at testing the response from the new administration.

That rocket - said by the North to use solid fuel and to be capable of carrying a nuclear warhead - flew east for about 500 kilometres before falling into the Sea of Japan, South Korea said at the time.

Seoul and Washington launched the annual Foal Eagle exercises last week, with the North's military warning a day later of "merciless nuclear counter-action" against enemy forces.

In a statement carried by the KCNA news agency, a spokesperson called the exercises "dangerous nuclear war drills against the DPRK at its doorstep" adding: "Our army will counter them with the toughest counteractions."

North Korea has regularly carried out actions in protest against the exercises, last year firing seven ballistic missiles during them.

Pyongyang is barred under UN resolutions from any use of ballistic missile technology. But six sets of UN sanctions since Pyongyang's first nuclear test in 2006 have failed to halt its drive for what it insists are defensive weapons.

Last month, China announced a suspension of all coal imports from the North until the end of the year, depriving Pyongyang of a crucial source of foreign currency.

China's foreign ministry said Beijing and Pyongyang were still "friendly neighbours" but added it remained opposed to the North's nuclear ambitions.

Read more on:    kim jong-un  |  us  |  japan  |  north korea  |  north korea nuclear programme  |  nuclear

Join the conversation!

24.com encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions.
NEXT ON NEWS24X

Inside News24

 
/Sport
 

SA stats: The role of pets in families

New survey shows impact animals have on SA families

 
 

Paws

The top 6 poisonous foods for your pet
Does your dog have separation anxiety?
Fascinating facts about dogs
Perfectly captured cat snapchats!
Traffic Alerts
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Settings

Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.




Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.