Peru guerrilla attack death toll raised to seven

2016-04-11 05:19
An area where Peruvian police destroyed dredges, engines and other mineral extracting equipment from illegal gold mining grounds in the Tambopata area, in the south eastern Madre de Dios area. (Ruben Grandez, AFP)

An area where Peruvian police destroyed dredges, engines and other mineral extracting equipment from illegal gold mining grounds in the Tambopata area, in the south eastern Madre de Dios area. (Ruben Grandez, AFP)

Multimedia   ·   User Galleries   ·   News in Pictures Send us your pictures  ·  Send us your stories

Lima - A guerilla attack on Peruvian soldiers on the eve of the country's presidential elections killed seven people, authorities said Sunday, raising the previous day's toll.

The head of the state prosecution service, Pablo Sanchez, said in a televised address that seven people were killed and five wounded in Saturday's attack in the jungles of central Peru.

The military earlier gave a toll of four killed - three soldiers and a civilian. They said guerrillas attacked a military convoy that was transporting electoral material and forces to guard voting stations in the central Junin region.

Authorities blamed remnants of the Shining Path communist guerilla group, which was largely crushed in the 1990s but still has members hiding in the jungle.

The army said attackers first struck at Hatun Asha, located in a jungle zone considered a stronghold of the guerrillas and a major coca-producing area.

In a second attack, they targeted a military ship on the Apurimac River in the south, wounding two soldiers, authorities said.

President Ollanta Humala condemned the "demented" violence.

"Terrorism and those who collude with it have no place in our society or in our family," he said on Saturday.

Some 23 million Peruvians were called to vote on Sunday for a new president and members of congress.

Mariano Cucho, head of the National Office of Electoral Processes, insisted that "this attack will not tarnish the elections."

Drug gangs

Leading the polls is conservative candidate Keiko Fujimori, whose father Alberto Fujimori waged a fierce conflict against the Shining Path when he was president from 1990 to 2000.

Around 69 000 people were killed between 1980 and 2000 in the conflict with the Shining Path, according to the country's Truth and Reconciliation commission.

"Peru has lived through these violent periods and we are working to bring peace to the country," Humala told a news conference.

"All these demented acts do is unite the Peruvian people more."

Authorities say remaining members of the guerilla group have joined forces with drug gangs and remain active in remote mountains and jungles.

Peru is one of the biggest coca leaf and cocaine producers in the world, according to the United Nations and US authorities.

Read more on:    shining path  |  peru

Join the conversation!

24.com encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions.

Inside News24

 
/World

Book flights

Compare, Book, Fly

Traffic Alerts
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Settings

Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.




Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.