Republicans: No hearing, vote for Obama court pick

2016-02-23 22:23
2014 file photo of US Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. (AP)

2014 file photo of US Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. (AP)

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Washington - Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday ruled out any hearing for President Barack Obama's nominee to the Supreme Court, insisting that the choice rests with the president's successor.

"Because our decision is based on constitutional principle and born of a necessity to protect the will of the American people, this committee will not hold hearings on any Supreme Court nominee until after our next president is sworn in on January 20 2017," they said in a letter to Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Even the most divisive nominees for the high court have received a hearing before the Judiciary Committee, and the election-year decision to deny such a session is a sharp break with the Senate's traditional "advise and consent" role. A committee review and a hearing is the first step in the process.

Antonin Scalia's February 13 death ignited a major fight in Washington over whether Obama should be able to replace him in a presidential election year. He had been dead only for a few hours when McConnell announced that he would oppose replacing him before the election.

The Republicans' action is certain to have repercussions, not only in the presidential race but in congressional contests where vulnerable Senate incumbents in Illinois, Wisconsin, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New Hampshire face tough Democratic challengers. At least one of those senators, Republican Mark Kirk of Illinois, has suggested holding hearings.

But Republican members of the committee met with McConnell and emerged with a simple message: "No hearing, no vote," said Senator Lindsey Graham.

Confirmation hearings for a Supreme Court nominee are the most high-profile in the Senate, and any session is certain to be a spectacle. Among the members of the panel is Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz, and the Texas senator has vowed to block any nominee.

Republicans pointed to a 1992 speech by Vice President Joe Biden, then the chair of the Judiciary Committee, in which he said that in a presidential election year the Senate should "not consider holding hearings until after the election".

As it turned out, there was no opening on the court that year.

Read more on:    us  |  us 2016 elections

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