Trump warns of political costs of rejecting health bill

2017-03-22 08:04
House Majority Whip Steve Scalise holds up a copy of the original Affordable Care Act. (J Scott Applewhite, AP)

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise holds up a copy of the original Affordable Care Act. (J Scott Applewhite, AP)

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Washington - President Donald Trump on Tuesday warned House Republicans they could lose their seats in next year's midterm elections if they failed to back the GOP health care overhaul and fulfill a long-promised goal to undo Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act.

In a rare trip to the Capitol, the president met behind closed doors with rank-and-file Republicans, some wavering on the legislation two days before a climactic vote. Top House Republicans unveiled revisions to their bill on Monday night in hopes of nailing down support.

Trump's message to Republicans: "If you don't pass the bill there could be political costs," said Rep Walter Jones, R-NC

The lawmaker said Trump said House GOP seats could be at risk if the bill fails and "the danger of your not voting for the bill is people could lose their seats."

Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis, told reporters Trump was "all-in" on repeal-and-replace and attending the meeting "to do what he does best: to close the deal".

Many older people

At a rally in Louisville, Kentucky, Trump underscored what he called "the crucial House vote.

"This is our long-awaited chance to finally get rid of Obamacare," he said of repealing former Obama's landmark law, a GOP goal since its 2010 enactment. "We're going to do it."

Trump's closed-door meeting with House Republicans was coming as party leaders released 43 pages worth of changes to a bill whose prospects remain dicey. Their proposals were largely aimed at addressing dissent that their measure would leave many older people with higher costs.

Included was an unusual approach: language paving the way for the Senate, if it chooses, to make the bill's tax credit more generous for people aged 50 to 64. Details in the documents released were initially unclear, but one GOP lawmaker and an aide said the plan sets aside $85bn over 10 years for that purpose.

The leaders' proposals would accelerate the repeal of tax increases Obama imposed on higher earners, the medical industry and others to this year instead of 2018. It would be easier for some people to deduct medical expenses from their taxes.

Older and disabled Medicaid beneficiaries would get larger benefits. But it would also curb future growth of the overall Medicaid programme, which helps low earners to afford medical coverage and let states impose work requirements on some recipients. Additional states could not join the 31 that opted to expand Medicaid to more beneficiaries under Obama's law, the Affordable Care Act.

In a bid to cement support from upstate New Yorkers, the revisions would also stop that state from passing on more than $2bn a year in Medicaid costs to counties. The change was pushed by Rep Chris Collins, R-NY, one of Trump's first congressional supporters. Local officials have complained the practice overburdens their budgets.

Lower earners

The GOP bill would dismantle Obama's requirements that most people buy policies and that larger companies cover workers. Federal subsidies based largely on peoples' incomes and insurance premiums would end and a Medicaid expansion to 11 million more low-income people would disappear.

The Republican legislation would provide tax credits to help people pay medical bills based chiefly on age and open-ended federal payments to help states cover Medicaid costs would be cut. Insurers could charge older consumers five times the premiums they charge younger people instead of Obama's 3-1 limit and would boost premiums 30% for those who let coverage lapse.

Republican support teetered last week when a nonpartisan congressional analysis projected the measure would strip 24 million people of coverage in a decade. The Congressional Budget Office also said the bill would cause huge out-of-pocket increases for many lower earners and people aged 50 to 64.

Democrats have opposed the GOP repeal effort. They tout Obama's expansion of coverage to 20 million additional people and consumer-friendly coverage requirements it imposed on insurers, including abolishing annual and lifetime coverage limits and forcing them to insure seriously ill people.


Read more on:    donald trump  |  barack obama  |  us  |  health care

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