US braces for flooding and tornadoes

2017-05-02 05:17
A tornado rips through a residential area after touching down south of Wynnewood, Oklahoma on May 09, 2016. (Josh Edelson, AFP, file)

A tornado rips through a residential area after touching down south of Wynnewood, Oklahoma on May 09, 2016. (Josh Edelson, AFP, file)

Multimedia   ·   User Galleries   ·   News in Pictures Send us your pictures  ·  Send us your stories

Atlanta - Parts of the US Midwest and South braced for more flooding and possible tornadoes on Monday following a weekend of deadly torrents and powerful winds that claimed at least 15 lives.

Storms rolled eastward in a band stretching from Alabama into the Ohio River valley on Monday, leaving isolated pockets of damage in their wake.

Heavy rain caused the roof of a furniture store in northern Oklahoma to collapse early on Monday, although no one was injured, and parts of the state remained under flood and flash flood warnings after excessive rainfall over the weekend.

The Illinois River that snakes through eastern Oklahoma crested on Sunday night at about 9m - well above major flood stage of 5.4m.

The Mississippi River was pushing 5m above flood stage in Missouri's Cape Girardeau on Monday, 15cm shy of the all-time record.

Flood fears

Levees were straining to contain the floods in Missouri.

A Cuivre River levee was topped near the town of Old Monroe, and in the St. Louis suburb of Valley Park, residents living below a levee on the rising Meramec River were ordered to evacuate on Monday.

Interstate 44 was flooded in spots and closed over a 90km stretch. Flooding also closed roads in hundreds of other places around Missouri.

More severe weather was expected in the South.

A wind advisory was in effect in northwest Mississippi. Tornado warnings were issued for parts of south-eastern Alabama and central Georgia on Monday morning by the National Weather Service, which advised residents there to take cover.

A severe thunderstorm over Fort Benning in Georgia could develop into a twister, the weather service said.

Parts of the Florida Panhandle could be affected by severe thunderstorms or high winds and dangerous rip currents.

The confirmed death toll rose to 15:

  • Flooding and winds killed five people in Arkansas, including a fire chief struck by a vehicle while working the storm. That toll could rise, with authorities searching for two children who were swept away when their mother drove their truck onto a bridge built for low water.
  • Tornadoes hit several small towns in East Texas, killing four people.
  • Three deaths were reported in Missouri, including a 78-year-old man who went out to look at the floodwaters, slipped into a creek and was carried away, and two people who drowned after rushing water swept away cars. One man couldn't save his 72-year-old wife from floodwaters that swept away their vehicle Saturday. Her body was found when the water receded, the Missouri State Highway Patrol said.
  • Two died in Mississippi: A 7-year-old boy electrocuted after unplugging an electric golf cart and dropping the cord in a puddle, and a man killed when a tree fell onto his house, knocking a beam into his head.
  • In Tennessee, a 2-year-old girl died after being struck by a soccer goal post thrown by heavy winds that also knocked down trees and power lines on Sunday. Wind and flood advisories remained in effect for much of the state on Monday.

In Texas, search teams were going door to door on Sunday after the tornadoes the day before flattened homes, uprooted trees and flipped several pickup trucks at a Dodge dealership in Canton.

"It is heart-breaking and upsetting to say the least," Canton Mayor Lou Ann Everett said.

The storms cut a path of destruction 56km long and 24km wide in Van Zandt County, Everett said. The largely rural area is about 80km east of Dallas.

The National Weather Service found evidence of four tornadoes with one twister possibly on the ground for 80km.

The first reports of tornadoes came about 16:45 on Saturday, but emergency crews were hampered by continuing severe weather, said Judge Don Kirkpatrick, the chief executive for Van Zandt County.

"We'd be out there working and get a report of another tornado on the ground," he said.

Read more on:    us  |  floods

Join the conversation!

24.com encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions.
NEXT ON NEWS24X

Inside News24

 
/World
 

Makeover saves dog’s life

Lucky Charlie got a complete make-over that helped him get adopted.

 
 

Paws

For the love of Corgis!
Can we communicate with our pets?
8 great natural remedies for your pet
Buying a puppy? Don’t get scammed!
Traffic Alerts
Traffic
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Settings

Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.




Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.