Anybody out there? Mysterious radio waves from deep space leave scientists baffled

By Pieter van Zyl
03 March 2016

Is E.T. trying to make contact with us? The adorable character with the glowing red finger from Steven Spielberg’s 1982 film, E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial, always wanted to phone home. But now it seems there might just be beings from outer space seeking to communicate with Earth.

Scientists yesterday revealed that “mysterious and powerful radio waves” from deep space had reached Earth. The existence of these waves was first discovered 10 years ago.

The radiation comes in clusters and originate from far beyond the Milky Way, according to a study that just been published in Nature journal.

Read more: Mysterious ‘woman’ spotted on Mars

In September 2013 a team of scientists announced that they might have discovered other life forms which landed in the stratosphere (10 to 50 km above Earth) via Perséides – the annual meteor shower

A team under the guidance of Professor Milton Wainwright of the University of Sheffield in England had released a hot air balloon during Perséides looking for life which might arrive with the meteor shower.

Wainwright said they found a diatom fragment and “other unknown entities”, which were detected when the hot air balloon was 25 km above Earth (space is above 100 km).

Read more: Did NASA’s Curiosity Rover just find a pyramid on Mars?

A diatom is an organism slightly bigger than a bacteriuim. A few years ago Dr Richard Hoover, a former employee of Nasa, made similar claims about other forms of life. He was criticised around the world and his research wasn’t accepted by peers.

Now Peter Scholz, a graduate student at McGill Space Institute at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, claims the radio waves were detected last year when they were sifting through data.

Only if the source of the radio waves can be identified plus the solar system from where they come, can their features be understood, says Jason Hessel of the University of Amsterdam, who co-authored the article with Scholz.

At this stage researchers are speculating that they’re from an “exotic object”.

Sources: nature.com, yahoo.com, phys.org, dailycaller.com, internetarchaeology.org/saufor

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